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By Barbara Sturm | December 9, 1990
The eerie, irregular horizons of West Texas are at their most photogenic beginning in late February. That's when bluebonnets -- the state flower -- bloom along the Rio Grande and transform already interesting geological vistas into dazzling panoramas.In addition to these botanical beauties, at least 60 varieties of cactus bloom in profusion throughout West Texas from February to May, lending a special cachet to the area's primary attractions -- the 1,100-square-mile Big Bend National Park and the Guadalupe Mountains National Park.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 18, 2013
The world is a ghetto. That is, yes, the title of an old song by War. It is also the reality presented by "Elysium," the new film by director Neill Blomkamp. It posits a ruined Earth in the year 2154, overcome by overcrowding, disease and environmental and economic collapse. Los Angeles is a dusty brown shantytown where people live on top of one another like some favela in Rio. Then the camera takes you up to the orbiting habitat to which the wealthy have decamped, Elysium. It's Latin for paradise, and that's what this is, assuming your idea of paradise is a McMansion with a manicured lawn the size of a city park where you live a life of vaguely sterile luxury.
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NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 15, 2001
LAREDO, Texas - From battered flatbed pickups to state-of-the-art tractor-trailers, the lines of trucks waiting to cross the grandly but aptly named U.S.-Mexico World Trade Bridge stretch as far as the eye can see. Watching this booming commerce cross the turbid Rio Grande makes Rafael Garcia almost breathless. From where he sits, the two countries have virtually melded to one. "People from up north think the river is where the U.S. ends and Mexico begins. In fact, it's where the U.S. blends into Mexico," said Garcia, the bridge director, who was born and raised in Laredo.
NEWS
July 15, 2010
My step-son has been in line for several years to obtain his green card. The way things are going, however, I should have advised him to go to Mexico and swim across the Rio Grande to the U.S. Greeting him must be President Barack Obama, holding out a citizenship card, a passport, free health insurance, a Social Security check, a plane ticket to Baltimore and, if he's lucky, a bottle of Gatorade. I'm all in favor of immigration: legal immigration. If it were not for the process of legal immigration, I wouldn't be here to write this letter, and I wouldn't be married to a naturalized U.S. citizen from Shanghai.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1998
RIO GRANDE VALLEY, Texas -- Farmers who till the rich soils of this broad river delta along the Mexican border are quietly praying for a disaster -- a powerful hurricane packing a dozen inches of rain.Such a storm -- similar to Tropical Storm Charley, which flooded parts of Texas about 350 miles from here last week -- would likely cause severe flooding and property damage.But, they insist, that may be the only escape from the disaster they're battling now.Despite a scattering of showers across the valley, drought this summer is steadily destroying one of the nation's most fertile farming regions here in deep south Texas, near Brownsville.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 3, 2001
BOCA CHICA BEACH, Texas - Until a few months ago, the Rio Grande gushed into the Gulf of Mexico here, but now the river's mouth is parched - instead of a ribbon of blue, a 500-foot sandbar marks the U.S.-Mexico border. That and a small sign, some strategically placed driftwood and a piece of drooping orange fence. An eight-year drought and voracious invaders - hundreds of thousands of thirsty migrants to booming border towns and exotic, water-hungry weeds - have consumed the great river's flow and helped bring it to this pathetic end after a journey of 1,900 miles from the Colorado mountains.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1996
BROWNSVILLE, Texas -- The surf had been picking up all weekend along the Gulf shore, churned by a ferocious east wind. The sky was clear, and the sun glinted off the foam. Out on South Padre Island, a long condo-filled barrier beach, the surfboard riders were ecstatic. Waves were coming in as high as 10 feet; it was the best surf, they were to say later, in 15 years.As always, Tejano music -- a blend of Mexican polka and Nashville, with a little mariachi and disco thrown in -- blared from radios on the beach.
SPORTS
November 12, 2007
Moves Basketball ROCKETS -- Assigned G Steve Novak to Rio Grande (NBDL). High school JOHN CARROLL -- Announced that basketball C Jakub Kusmieruk made verbal commitment to Central Florida.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 16, 1995
Can a snowball roll uphill? Can the peso crisis cross the Rio Grande?We'll just have to wait for the Hollywood remake of "Malcolm X."Q. If the hockey strike is settled, can baseball be far behind? A. Oh yes.Bill is back on top of his game. Just ask his flunkies.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | February 23, 1996
Buchanan demands a Great Wall of China on the Rio Grande. GOP mandarins want him on the other side of it.The Oklahoma City bombing case was moved to Denver in search of a fair jury. No one in Denver has heard of Oklahoma City.What kind of country would this be if they let you buy only one measly handgun a month?Point guard Duane Simpkins owes the University of Maryland $8,000 in parking tickets. That's a lot of hours at the library.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | January 13, 2010
The Houston Rockets have called up Joey Dorsey (Douglass) from Rio Grande Valley of the NBA Development League to add depth to their front line. Dorsey, 6 feet 8, was assigned to the Vipers on Nov. 13 and averaged 14.9 points and 13.3 rebounds while shooting 65 percent from the field in 16 games. He was a second-round pick out of Memphis in 2008. Pro soccer: Crystal Palace Baltimore named Todd Wawrousek assistant coach. Wawrousek was an assistant for the Vancouver Whitecaps FC, helping guide the club to the 2007 USL1 playoffs, the 2008 USL1 championship and the 2009 USL1 finals.
TRAVEL
By Liz Atwood | December 20, 2009
Perhaps no other U.S. city is as closely linked to Mexican history as San Antonio. So even though San Antonio was no longer part of Mexico when the Mexican army defeated the invading French at the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862, the city celebrates its Mexican heritage throughout the year. This is especially true at the holidays when traditional luminarias and pinatas shine throughout the city. But even if you don't visit at Christmastime, there's plenty to do all year long. 1 Remember the Alamo : Texas' No. 1 tourist attraction marks the site where 189 defenders fell to Santa Anna's army on March 6, 1836.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | July 29, 2009
When I did a Top 10 list of Mexican restaurants a while back, I promised to make up a list of Tex-Mex at a later date. Last week I finally got around to it, even though I knew the list would create an uproar. My biggest problem was that it was hard to come up with 10 good, bad or indifferent. I didn't want to include chains. My one regret is that I didn't include Taco Fiesta in Harbor East, which several readers recommended when they saw my list. 1 Austin Grill in Canton. An area chain that features 15 homemade salsas and sauces and mesquite-grilled fish.
SPORTS
November 12, 2007
Moves Basketball ROCKETS -- Assigned G Steve Novak to Rio Grande (NBDL). High school JOHN CARROLL -- Announced that basketball C Jakub Kusmieruk made verbal commitment to Central Florida.
NEWS
By MIGUEL BUSTILLO and MIGUEL BUSTILLO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 13, 2006
McALLEN, Texas -- Carlos Gonzalez gunned the throttle. The roar of the outboard motor warned everyone within a mile that the U.S. Border Patrol was rounding the serpentine bend of the Rio Grande known as the cola del diablo, or devil's tail. Turtles scurried off logs and into the green, murky water as the Border Patrol boat raced by at 35 mph, flanked by a second boat with a hard-faced agent in dark sunglasses holding an M-4 carbine assault rifle. On the Mexican side, men with fishing poles by their feet rested in the tropical sun. Their eyes followed every move the boats made.
NEWS
By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 6, 2004
SAN ELIZARIO, Texas - Should the worst fears of a Harvard professor come true, this desert crossroads could be the sentimental capital of a separatist movement aiming to detach the Southwest from the United States. In a recent issue of Foreign Policy magazine, Samuel P. Huntington took a worried look at the waves of Mexicans who have been crossing the Rio Grande - whose banks mark the outskirts of this dusty border town of 4,385, about 20 miles south of El Paso. He fears that the increasing numbers of Spanish speakers in a band of states running from California through Arizona and New Mexico to Texas could bring our nation the unhappy experience of linguistically split societies, such as Canada and the former Yugoslavia.
NEWS
July 15, 2010
My step-son has been in line for several years to obtain his green card. The way things are going, however, I should have advised him to go to Mexico and swim across the Rio Grande to the U.S. Greeting him must be President Barack Obama, holding out a citizenship card, a passport, free health insurance, a Social Security check, a plane ticket to Baltimore and, if he's lucky, a bottle of Gatorade. I'm all in favor of immigration: legal immigration. If it were not for the process of legal immigration, I wouldn't be here to write this letter, and I wouldn't be married to a naturalized U.S. citizen from Shanghai.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 25, 1990
SARANDI, Brazil -- As Juvino Rodrigues de Aquino cleared brush with a sickle, a straining ox team plowed long furrows, slowly opening black soil as rich as chocolate cake.The scene was pastoral, but in fact the barefoot farmer and his brother were tilling land they had occupied illegally.Land occupations in Brazil occur almost daily, presenting a growing challenge to Fernando Collor de Mello, the first civilian elected president here in 30 years.Until 25 years of military rule ended in Brazil in 1985, the demands of millions of landless peasants were suppressed with violence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington and Kevin E. Washington,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
I must admit that I am a late adopter of digital audio technology. Between the free music grab on the Internet and the slightly lower fidelity of MP3s, I just wasn't impressed. But the MusicMatch and iTunes services have gotten me downloading more and more music - thanks to their 99 cents-a-track policies - and I needed to find something to do with all these songs besides listening while tethered to my computer by headphones. To that end, I have taken a look at Rio's latest line of MP3/WMA players and fallen in love with the simple-to-use devices that provide tunes wherever I don't feel like lugging dozens of compact discs and a CD player.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 23, 2001
QUETTA, Pakistan - At this oasis town near the Afghan border, the lines between Pakistan and Afghanistan blur together like the waves of heat rippling off the desert floor. More than half the population is ethnic Afghan. It shares a language - Pashtun - and tastes in food and an adaptation to an unforgiving landscape with the people to the west, in Afghanistan. The populations straddling this mountainous border are as nearly alike as Americans and Mexicans living on opposite sides of the Rio Grande - except they also share support for Islamic fundamentalism.
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