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By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2001
SHE ENTERS just before intermission. This is what the audience has been waiting for. Into the darkened arena floats a huge glass globe, and from within it rises Sara Houcke, the headliner for the 130th edition of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey's Greatest Show on Earth. It is a star's entrance. Lowered into a cage with eight full-grown Bengal tigers, the 23-year-old doesn't flinch. She doesn't puff up, wield a chair or shout at the animals. Instead, she gently demonstrates her control through hand signals and intimate whispers.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Monster trucks, wild animals and figure skaters draw millions to Feld Entertainment's live traveling shows each year. But some of that magic comes from an unlikely arena — an industrial complex in Jessup. Thousands of stuffed toys, flashing light sticks and elephant-shaped snowcone cups move annually through Howard County, restocking concession stands at Feld's numerous events. The company produces such popular shows as the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus, Disney On Ice and Monster Jam. "If you went to the circus and you didn't have the snowcones, cotton candy and popcorn, it wouldn't be the circus," said Feld spokesman Stephen Payne.
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FEATURES
By Kelly A. J. Powers and Kelly A. J. Powers,Special to The Sun | March 19, 1994
The first thing Almas Meirmanov does in the morning, even before getting out of bed, is do a handstand, then a split, a tumble and a back flip.Sounds like pretty normal stuff for a rambunctious 8-year-old boy.But Almas is hardly just an ordinary young boy. He's a full-fledged member of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, and his morning regimen -- conducted in the 15-foot by 6 1/2 -foot train car where he lives with his parents -- is actually his first practice of the day.Practice, practice, practice; it makes the act better, says his partner and father, Nourbol.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
Elephants from the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus visited a Baltimore staple Wednesday for a mid-circus snack. In town for performances at the Baltimore Arena since March 26 through April 6, the elephants visited the Lexington Market for a vegetarian buffet. Four Asian elephants made the trip, munching on bananas, carrots, apples and more outside the venue. Circus fans and children looked on in a rare opportunity to see the pachyderms on city streets. The meal is a staple alongside the circus, and has been held annually for 30 years while the elephants are in town.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | January 4, 1991
The Greatest Show on Earth will return to Baltimore by 1993, now that Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus has patched up its differences with the managers of the Baltimore Arena.The Centre Group, which was given a contract to manage the Baltimore Arena in 1988, had not done business with Ringling Brothers since 1978, when the circus pulled out of the Capital Centre in Landover following a dispute with the arena's owner, Abe Pollin.The feud ran so deep that Ringling turned its back on a quarter-century history of money-making shows in Baltimore and pulled out of the Arena when Pollin's Centre Group assumed control of the venue.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | January 4, 1991
Not so long ago, elephants would rumble up Eutaw Street once a year on their way from Camden Station to the Baltimore Arena and the annual Baltimore performance of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum and Bailey Circus.But in 1988 the elephants and the rest of the Ringling circus stopped coming to Baltimore because of a feud between the owners of the Ringling and Abe Pollin, who heads the group hired by the city to manage the arena.Now, though, it seems likely the Ringling elephants will once again parade through Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Marsh and Sara Marsh,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 1997
Where do you find cavorting clowns, ponderous pachyderms, leaping lions, terrifying tigers, amazing acrobats and jolly jugglers all under one roof? Anyone who has ever experienced "The Greatest Show On Earth" knows the answer -- Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus.The 126th edition of the ever-changing show for all ages rolls into Baltimore next week for a 12-day run, starting March 12. Circus officials promise a spectacular series of 19 performances that will astound audiences with the amazing feats of a variety of animals and artist/athletes, including Airiana the Human Arrow, who flies with the aid of the world's largest crossbow.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL BARNETT and MICHAEL BARNETT,SUN REPORTER | March 11, 2006
The entertainment world's lord of the rings, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, is turning the spotlight on the audience as it celebrates its 135th anniversary this year. The show, which rolled into Baltimore this week and will run at 1st Mariner Arena through March 19, includes an audience-exercise routine, the chance to partake in a few circus stunts, try on costumes and talk with the performers. "We're one year older than baseball. Things need to be done to keep fresh," says Melinda Rosser, a Ringling Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
105 years of shows. 90,000 pounds of elephants. And a bunch of shoes, size 28EEEEE. For the clowns, of course. When it comes to the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus, an entertainment extravaganza that routinely, without being challenged, bills itself as "The Greatest Show on Earth," the numbers alone tell quite a story. There is, for example, 118. That's the number of performers involved in putting on "Fully Charged," the circus show that will be playing at Baltimore's 1st Mariner Arena through April 1. They include 25-year-old ringmaster Brian Crawford Scott, among the youngest in the circus' century-plus history; 2 juggling Fusco Brothers, Emiliano and Maximiliano, whose act includes juggling flaming clubs in the dark while standing back-to-back; and 1 Sean Davis, a clown with a degree (really!
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 10, 2009
Gerry Kreml, the advance voice of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Dec. 4 at her Catonsville home. She was 91. Attired in a leopard-print coat, Mrs. Kreml swept into Baltimore newspaper offices, television and radio stations with handfuls of circus passes in the 1970s. She would typically begin her greeting with, "Darling. How have you been? It's so-o-o-o good to see you. Wait 'til you see the circus this year." She broke gender barriers as a circus promoter who drummed up business weeks ahead of the greatest show.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
He stands on a grassy slope, right arm extended upward with an alfalfa treat, addressing his 4-ton companion in the tones of a tender friend. "You're a sweetie, aren't you? You're special," Mike McClure says. And Dolly plucks the treat from his hand, curls it into her mouth and emits a guttural rumble. That's the sound of a pachyderm purring, says McClure, the director of animal programs at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore and an internationally known handler of elephants. Dolly, 36, is an African elephant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
105 years of shows. 90,000 pounds of elephants. And a bunch of shoes, size 28EEEEE. For the clowns, of course. When it comes to the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus, an entertainment extravaganza that routinely, without being challenged, bills itself as "The Greatest Show on Earth," the numbers alone tell quite a story. There is, for example, 118. That's the number of performers involved in putting on "Fully Charged," the circus show that will be playing at Baltimore's 1st Mariner Arena through April 1. They include 25-year-old ringmaster Brian Crawford Scott, among the youngest in the circus' century-plus history; 2 juggling Fusco Brothers, Emiliano and Maximiliano, whose act includes juggling flaming clubs in the dark while standing back-to-back; and 1 Sean Davis, a clown with a degree (really!
NEWS
March 16, 2012
Next week, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey will return to Baltimore with Fully Charged!, the 141st edition of The Greatest Show On Earth. Everyone at Ringling Bros. takes great pride in presenting quality family entertainment to audiences in Baltimore and across the country. Unfortunately, animal rights groups such as People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals have used our return to continue their radical agenda by distorting our dedication to animal care and welfare. It's time we set the record straight.
NEWS
March 13, 2012
I read The Sun's recent article regarding circus elephants being mistreated, and I feel Jada Pinkett Smith has been misinformed regarding how the circus and other traveling circuses around the country care for their animals ("Jada Pinkett Smith urges SRB to protect elephants," March 6). I hope Ms. Smith will visit the circus when it's in Baltimore March 21 through April 1 and see how well Ringling Bros. Circus cares for not only elephants but all of their animals. Also, see how bull hooks are only used to guide elephants and do them no harm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blakewants to teach Jada Pinkett Smith a lesson in that old, scratch my back, I'll scratch yours thing. Earlier this week the actress sent the mayor a letter, asking her to make sure the elephants are well treated when the Ringling Bros. circus comes to town later this month. She feared the circus would be jabbing the animals with pointy sticks. But the mayor is something less than moved to act. Particularly after the actress didn't exactly help her out. “We've reached out about homelessness, about school issues,” Rawlings-Blake told WJZ. “I would have loved to gotten some feedback, support or concern about those issues that are very pressing to the city.” And that's not all. The mayor, a known fan of the circus, who's accepted free tickets to the show and even a ceremonial role in the event, said she's still looking forward to it this year.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
It's late on a steamy August morning. Forty scholars and their lecturer have been at their studies for a couple of hours. One of the more challenging courses in the summer program at Anne Arundel Community College is already well under way. But there are no desks or chalkboard. The classroom is a gym, and six young people are walking the floor on stilts. Eight more spin plates on sticks, and one weaves his way through the commotion on a bicycle the size of a ringmaster's hat. Welcome to Circus Camp, a five-day, 40-hour expedition through the big-top arts in which comedy is king, the teacher is a clown and the students — county children between the ages of 7 and 14 — will be able to conquer the course material only if they can manage not to take themselves too seriously.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | March 14, 2007
The stylishly dressed woman delighted in twirling hula hoops with preschoolers during the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus pre-show event. She drew as large a crowd as the elaborately dressed clowns, acrobats and animal trainers who signed autographs and displayed their talents. But who was she? The kids couldn't have cared less. They were too busy enjoying themselves. If you go Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus at the 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St. Showtimes vary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Megan Kennedy and Megan Kennedy,contributing writer | March 4, 1999
Hurry, hurry, step right up! Come see incredible sideshow sensations! Witness the unbelievable Siamese Twins Chang and Eng, joined at the breastbone; or marvel at Alexandrinos, the Tattooed Man -- even his eyelids and ears are covered with elaborate designs!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2011
An animal-rights group contends that an elephant performing in Baltimore with the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus poses a health risk to the public because she has tested positive for tuberculosis, but circus and government health officials say the animal is no threat because she does not have an active form of the infectious disease. Karen, a 42-year-old Asian elephant, tested positive for TB in a blood test but negative in a follow-up test known as a trunk wash, which involves taking a culture of saline solution run through the animal's trunk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
The circuses are coming to town! That's right, we're talking plural. Over the next week, both the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus and Cirque du Soleil will be landing in Baltimore for extended stays. Barnum & Bailey, in fact, is already here — opening night was Wednesday (maybe you were lucky enough to watch the elephants lumber from the B&O Railroad Museum to 1st Mariner Arena the other day). Cirque du Soleil will be pitching its tent on the Westport waterfront and offering its first show April 7. Of course, in a perfect world, you'd be able to catch both shows.
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