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By Houston Chronicle | October 27, 1994
A Hollywood producer and Daphne Hereford have landed in each other's doghouse.Ms. Hereford, of the Houston suburb of Pearland, owns a descendant of the 1950s TV star Rin Tin Tin IV. But Herbert B. Leonard produced the series that starred the dog and owns the films of those episodes.Both claim exclusive rights to the Rin Tin Tin name. It appears the dispute is heading for a long dogfight in a California federal court.Ms. Hereford lives in a small house packed with memorabilia such as movie posters, statuettes and old tin cans bearing the popular canine star's picture.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | February 3, 2007
The death this week of Barbaro and the ensuing blizzard of newspaper copy that chronicled every moment of his all-too-brief life and the heroic medical efforts made to try to save him, reflects how seriously as a nation we love our animals and mourn their passing. When Rin Tin Tin, the canine screen star of the Roaring '20s -- who never earned less than $30,000 during his nine-year career -- died in 1932, obituaries were published in many of the nation's newspapers, including The Sun, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Chicago Tribune.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | February 3, 2007
The death this week of Barbaro and the ensuing blizzard of newspaper copy that chronicled every moment of his all-too-brief life and the heroic medical efforts made to try to save him, reflects how seriously as a nation we love our animals and mourn their passing. When Rin Tin Tin, the canine screen star of the Roaring '20s -- who never earned less than $30,000 during his nine-year career -- died in 1932, obituaries were published in many of the nation's newspapers, including The Sun, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Chicago Tribune.
FEATURES
By Houston Chronicle | October 27, 1994
A Hollywood producer and Daphne Hereford have landed in each other's doghouse.Ms. Hereford, of the Houston suburb of Pearland, owns a descendant of the 1950s TV star Rin Tin Tin IV. But Herbert B. Leonard produced the series that starred the dog and owns the films of those episodes.Both claim exclusive rights to the Rin Tin Tin name. It appears the dispute is heading for a long dogfight in a California federal court.Ms. Hereford lives in a small house packed with memorabilia such as movie posters, statuettes and old tin cans bearing the popular canine star's picture.
NEWS
April 14, 1992
James Brown, 72, an actor best known as Lt. Rip Masters in the 1950s television series "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin," died Saturday of cancer at his Los Angeles home. He began his acting career in the 1940s and appeared in more than 40 films, including "Going My Way," "Air Force," "The Fabulous Texan" and "The Charge at Feather River." He also appeared in many television shows, including "Dallas," "Murder She Wrote," "Route 66" and "Gunsmoke." "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" featured a German shepherd and a young boy, Rusty, as his sidekick.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 5, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:THE MAN'S BACK -- Well-liked James Garner ("Rockford," "Maverick") returned to series TV this fall as -- what else? -- a slick-talking con man who ends up a city councilman. But NBC placed his semi-engaging "Man of the People" on Sunday nights, opposite CBS' heavy hitter "Murder, She Wrote," and it was a ratings bust. After a brief hiatus, the show is returning Friday with a one-hour special airing, "Mr. Doyle Goes to Vegas." If he can't make the old formula work there, it won't work anywhere.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | October 19, 1993
As Ella Joyce puts it, she's "done the starving actor bit." But Ms. Joyce, who plays wife and mother, Eleanor, on Fox's "Roc," thinks those nine lean years helped her keep things in perspective."
NEWS
September 4, 2003
Amram Ducovny, 75, an author and father of actor David Duchovny, died of heart disease Aug. 23 in Paris, his daughter said Tuesday. Mr. Ducovny, who published a lauded first novel at age 73, adopted Paris as his home about 10 years ago. He dropped the "h" from the original spelling of his name. His novel, Coney, was a semi-autobiographical account of an adolescent's lurid adventures among Coney Island misfits on the eve of World War II. His New York agent, Andrew Blauner, said Mr. Ducovny finished a sequel, titled A Lifetime is Once, but didn't know if the manuscript would be published.
FEATURES
By STEVE MCKERROW | November 16, 1991
Have you found Tintin yet? The cowlicked cartoon character from France has finally found America -- or at least the America that can watch cable television."
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Here is a partial list of famous Fidos of stage and screen, culled from Buff Huntley, dramaturge and administrator of the New Old Theatre, and from various Web sites. Dragon: A legend about a wolfhound by this name was the inspiration for the 1790 play The Dog of Montargis. According to the story, Dragon led searchers to the grave of his beloved master and indicated the murderer by the unusual hostility that he showed to a prominent aristocrat. After the suspect (armed only with a cudgel)
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | October 19, 1993
As Ella Joyce puts it, she's "done the starving actor bit." But Ms. Joyce, who plays wife and mother, Eleanor, on Fox's "Roc," thinks those nine lean years helped her keep things in perspective."
NEWS
April 14, 1992
James Brown, 72, an actor best known as Lt. Rip Masters in the 1950s television series "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin," died Saturday of cancer at his Los Angeles home. He began his acting career in the 1940s and appeared in more than 40 films, including "Going My Way," "Air Force," "The Fabulous Texan" and "The Charge at Feather River." He also appeared in many television shows, including "Dallas," "Murder She Wrote," "Route 66" and "Gunsmoke." "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" featured a German shepherd and a young boy, Rusty, as his sidekick.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 5, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:THE MAN'S BACK -- Well-liked James Garner ("Rockford," "Maverick") returned to series TV this fall as -- what else? -- a slick-talking con man who ends up a city councilman. But NBC placed his semi-engaging "Man of the People" on Sunday nights, opposite CBS' heavy hitter "Murder, She Wrote," and it was a ratings bust. After a brief hiatus, the show is returning Friday with a one-hour special airing, "Mr. Doyle Goes to Vegas." If he can't make the old formula work there, it won't work anywhere.
FEATURES
By Janis Campbell | May 18, 1998
Wishbone, the doggie star of the popular PBS show and book series, just loves to dig up classic stories. We recently got the busy terrier to paws (get it?) and tell the Yak about his adventures. Rick Duffield, creator and executive producer of "Wishbone," translated the woofs and arfs for us. Here's what he said:Q: What's your all-time favorite story?A: Gosh, I really don't have a favorite. In fact, the thing I love most about doing this show is that we explore so many different types of stories.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 30, 2000
Here in the newspaper business (Motto: "Eventually, We WILL Find Your Driveway") we have a strict rule: We don't print ANYTHING unless we know it's true. Except for the horoscope, of course. No offense, but if you take the horoscope seriously, your frontal lobes are the size of Raisinets. Also some of the comics are not 100 percent accurate. For example, in real life, Garfield walks on four legs. He's a CAT, for gosh sakes! Also, to be honest, many of us who work at newspapers don't hold the opinions that our newspapers express in the editorials.
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