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NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | April 28, 1995
London. -- Does it take Human Rights Watch to point out the obvious? In its latest report, it says ''the current epidemic of communal violence is today's paramount human-rights problem.'' Unfortunately, it does have to be pointed out, because our governments and much of our press have failed to analyze the problem thoroughly.On carnage and relief efforts, the media are often adept, portraying each new disaster with great strokes of verbal and visual color. But on causes, they too often fall back hastily upon simple explanations such as ''deep-seated hatreds'' and ''ancient animosities.
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NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | June 15, 1994
JERUSALEM -- Neither peace agreements nor public scrutiny has lessened the systematic torture and ill treatment of Palestinian prisoners by Israeli authorities, according to a 316-page report to be released today by an international human rights organization.While interrogating an estimated 4,000 to 6,000 Palestinians each year, the report says, the Israeli army and the General Security Service "engage in a systematic pattern of ill-treatment and torture -- according to internationally recognized definitions of the terms.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Writer | May 9, 1994
Washington -- If the world wants to put a human face on the horror taking place in the killing fields of a tiny, Central East African nation called Rwanda, it need look no further than the face of Rwandan human rights leader Monique Mujawamariya. The violence is etched there in the scars on her face, the result of an assassination attempt. The history of Rwanda is there, too: in the mixture of tribal blood that flows through her from her Hutu father and Tutsi mother.And like hundreds of thousands of her fellow Rwandans, Monique Mujawamariya has had to flee her country and the massacres that began a month ago after a mysterious plane crash killed the presidents of Rwanda and neighboring Burundi.
NEWS
February 4, 1994
The State Department has highlighted a neglected field of human rights deprivation on reporting the status of women in 193 countries. It is idle to talk about human rights violations without noticing rape, slavery, genital mutilation, forced prostitution, lack of marital rights, prohibition against driving, lack of career and education opportunities and other practices that make women less equal than men in many nations.The new emphasis is telling it like it is, a reflection of the Clinton administration's priority for women's issues, and a form of political grandstanding that is not new with this report.
NEWS
By Stanley A. Blumberg | April 1, 1991
HUMAN RIGHTS IN IRAQ. A Human Rights Watch Book. By David A. Korn. Yale University Press. 155 pages. $19.95.COUNTRIES that torture their citizens almost always deny it.Several years ago, I encountered an example of this while having dinner with a government minister in Seoul. My host refused to admit that his government engaged in this cruel practice. It was only after I reminded him that one of our mutual friends had lost the sight of an eye while in a local prison that he stopped protesting and fell silent.
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