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NEWS
By Susan Reimer | March 14, 2011
National Public Radio fired its CEO and its lead fundraiser last week and another fundraiser was suspended after the latest in video stings orchestrated by conservative activist James O'Keefe. Just as the funding for NPR's parent company, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, was under scrutiny in Congress, a video surfaced showing Ron Schiller, president of the NPR Foundation, making disparaging remarks about tea party members and saying that the CPB could survive without federal money.
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SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | March 6, 2007
Friends, I have met the enemy, and be forewarned, he's more concerned with the hard drive than the hard court, more protective of the World Wide Web than the wide world of sports, and he will stop at nothing to cut out the 'Net to keep you from seeing who cuts down the nets. That's right, there are computer technicians currently working around the clock to take away our inalienable right to Internet access at work during the NCAA tournament. I know what you're thinking, and yes, this is something that was guaranteed in both the Bill of Rights and the Ten Commandments.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Before anyone goes off on how the Orioles came up short on another veteran free-agent pitcher, that reported $16 million guarantee that A.J. Burnett got from the Philadelphia Phillies apparently is for just one year. So, don't bother taking the Orioles to task, because that's a ridiculous price for a guy who wasn't even sure he wanted to pitch this year and didn't have a winning record in 2013. Sure, he actually had a good year in spite of that 10-11 record (3.30 ERA, 209 strikeouts)
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2005
School officials and advocacy groups throughout Maryland are watching an age discrimination case that has the potential to affect the coffers of every state school system, as well as employees who think their districts wronged them. At issue is whether workers can sue local school boards in Maryland courts over suspected violations of federal protections, which include the Family and Medical Leave Act and constitutional claims. School officials fear that allowing these lawsuits in state courts would unleash potentially expensive litigation for local school boards.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2004
Within the past nine months, two respected human rights groups released reports describing what they said was the abuse of U.S.-held prisoners in Afghanistan, including instances of beatings, sleep deprivation and, in a small number of cases, killings of detainees. The conditions that they described are roughly similar to those now under investigation at U.S.-run detention centers in Iraq. But the reports from Afghanistan received little attention when they were published. Yesterday, the Army acknowledged that 20 investigations were under way into prisoner assaults and deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 1, 1997
WASHINGTON -- International donors have pumped an estimated $3 million in reconstruction aid into a Bosnian Serb town run by a rogues' gallery of war crimes suspects, conferring a semblance of respectability on town leaders and undercutting investigations by the United Nations war crimes tribunal, a watchdog group says.In a 70-page report, Human Rights Watch says the mayor, deputy mayor, police chief, hospital director and director of a local organization claiming to be the Red Cross were all deeply implicated in "ethnic cleansing" in Prijedor, a town in northwest Bosnia.
NEWS
December 5, 2004
A PROMINENT JAMAICAN gay rights activist is brutally murdered one June morning, and a crowd gathers to rejoice and sing "Boom Bye Bye," a popular reggae song about killing gay men. Nine days later, another gay man is "chopped, stabbed and stoned to death" by an angry mob egged on by police officers who, according to a witness, told them to "beat him because him a battyman," local slang for homosexual. Days later, six men are driven from their home and beaten by a group of angry men. When they report the crime to police, officers nearly laugh them out of the station.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
Advocates for juvenile justice reform called yesterday for a grand jury investigation of conditions at the Baltimore City Detention Center and the treatment of youths held there awaiting trial.But LaMont Flanagan, the state official who oversees the facility said that, under state law, a grand jury tours the jail and reviews operations at least twice a year and has not found serious problems."They [grand jurors] already come in here every five months and do a thorough investigation," Flanagan said.
NEWS
June 17, 2000
THE NATION'S war on drugs has been selective. While police arrest an increasingly large number of blacks on drug charges, they have failed to catch and convict white drug dealers. Blacks are punished far more often than whites on drug charges nationwide. In Maryland, an astounding 90 percent of those serving time on drug charges are black, according to a report by Human Rights Watch. This disparity would seem fair if nine of 10 drug sellers were black, but they aren't. A survey cited in the Human Rights Watch report found that 82 percent of admitted drug sellers were white.
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