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NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1999
LaMont W. Flanagan doesn't dispute that the jail he runs in Baltimore is grim. But he bristles when it is portrayed as an inhumane, unsanitary and unsafe place to hold youths awaiting trial for serious crimes.The conditions at the Baltimore City Detention Center are not, he insists, "appalling" -- the descriptive term that the New York-based group, Human Rights Watch, uses often in a recent report about juveniles held in adult jails in Maryland."It is antiquated," Flanagan said, noting that parts of the jail were built in 1802.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Before anyone goes off on how the Orioles came up short on another veteran free-agent pitcher, that reported $16 million guarantee that A.J. Burnett got from the Philadelphia Phillies apparently is for just one year. So, don't bother taking the Orioles to task, because that's a ridiculous price for a guy who wasn't even sure he wanted to pitch this year and didn't have a winning record in 2013. Sure, he actually had a good year in spite of that 10-11 record (3.30 ERA, 209 strikeouts)
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 2005
For the first time, Human Rights Watch has issued a report that harshly criticizes a single industry in the United States, concluding that working conditions among the nation's meatpackers and slaughterhouses are so bad that they violate basic human rights. The report, released yesterday, echoes Upton Sinclair's classic on the industry, The Jungle. It finds that jobs in many beef, pork and poultry plants are so dangerous as to breach international agreements promising a safe workplace.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 14, 2011
National Public Radio fired its CEO and its lead fundraiser last week and another fundraiser was suspended after the latest in video stings orchestrated by conservative activist James O'Keefe. Just as the funding for NPR's parent company, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, was under scrutiny in Congress, a video surfaced showing Ron Schiller, president of the NPR Foundation, making disparaging remarks about tea party members and saying that the CPB could survive without federal money.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 8, 2000
WASHINGTON - Setbacks and successes marked the human rights landscape in the Americas during 2000, with the deteriorating situation in Colombia "constituting the region's most urgent crisis," according to the annual report from Human Rights Watch. The 11th annual survey, an in-depth look at conditions in 70 countries, also details continuing abuses in Cuba, electoral violence in Haiti and the weakening of judicial and political systems in Peru. The high level of violence and civilian casualties in Colombia, involving government, guerrilla and paramilitary forces, received special scrutiny from the international monitoring organization.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - Iraqi civilians are being arrested arbitrarily, tortured while in jail and threatened with indefinite detention unless they pay bribes, according to a study released yesterday by Human Rights Watch. The abuse of detainees has become "routine and commonplace," the group said in its 94-page report, The New Iraq? Torture and Ill Treatment of Detainees in Iraqi Custody. The report said that Iraq's interim government appeared to be either an active participant in the abuses, or "is at least complicit."
NEWS
By Howard Schneider and Howard Schneider,The Washington Post | March 26, 2009
JERUSALEM -Israel's use of white phosphorus artillery shells led to the deaths of at least 12 Palestinian civilians and destroyed millions of dollars in property during the recent three-week war in the Gaza Strip, Human Rights Watch says in a report released Wednesday. Israeli military officials called the claim "baseless" and said the shells, designed to produce a smoke screen, were used in accordance with accepted rules. A frequent critic of Israeli military practices, New York-based Human Rights Watch says its review of the Gaza fighting found instances in which white phosphorus rounds were used in urban areas under circumstances that had no clear military rationale.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1999
A city grand jury that regularly inspects jails will be asked to review a human rights group's report that sharply criticized conditions for youths confined in Baltimore City Detention Center.Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said she will recommend that the report by New York-based Human Rights Watch be reviewed by a new city grand jury to be impaneled in January.She disclosed those plans in a Nov. 16 letter to Jonathan M. Smith, executive director of Public Justice Center, a Baltimore advocacy group that provides legal services to the poor.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1999
Hundreds of juveniles awaiting trial in Maryland are locked each day in bleak adult jails like the Baltimore City Detention Center where they endure rampant violence and appalling conditions, a human rights group says.In a report released today, the New York-based Human Rights Watch also said some guards at the Baltimore facility condone and organize fights between youths who have scores to settle. It said that jailed youths lack adequate food, education and mental health services.LaMont Flanagan, the state official who oversees the city detention center, said the report gives a "highly exaggerated picture" of conditions there, and he flatly denied that any guards were allowing youths to fight.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration this year has "actively obstructed" human rights efforts as well as new mechanisms to enforce internationally accepted standards, according to a highly critical report released yesterday by Human Rights Watch.The report says U.S. actions particularly have been hurtful on three issues now on the front line of the global human rights campaign: child soldiers, land mines and an international criminal court.The U.S. practice of ignoring human rights in some areas and adopting a "selective" commitment based on economic convenience or strategic interests in others poses "a growing threat" to human rights in key parts of the world, most vividly in China and Central Africa, it charges.
NEWS
By Howard Schneider and Howard Schneider,The Washington Post | March 26, 2009
JERUSALEM -Israel's use of white phosphorus artillery shells led to the deaths of at least 12 Palestinian civilians and destroyed millions of dollars in property during the recent three-week war in the Gaza Strip, Human Rights Watch says in a report released Wednesday. Israeli military officials called the claim "baseless" and said the shells, designed to produce a smoke screen, were used in accordance with accepted rules. A frequent critic of Israeli military practices, New York-based Human Rights Watch says its review of the Gaza fighting found instances in which white phosphorus rounds were used in urban areas under circumstances that had no clear military rationale.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,Tribune Newspapers | February 21, 2009
BEIJING -Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said yesterday that she would not emphasize contentious issues such as human rights in talks this weekend with the Chinese and focus instead on topics on which progress might be more likely: the economy, climate change and security issues. Clinton's weeklong tour of Asia culminates with meetings in China, where she is remembered for a tough 1994 speech on human rights. But she said that after years of pressing Beijing, the dialogue on human rights, freedom for Tibet and accommodation with Taiwan had grown predictable.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | December 21, 2007
For a few years in the 1980s and 1990s, the world was changing for the better and seemingly destined to keep doing so indefinitely. Back then, freedom resembled justice as described in the Bible - rolling down like waters. But in the last few years, various governments have managed to dam it up, and in some cases even reverse the flow. Between 1990 and 1997, the number of democracies in the world rose from 69 to 118, according to the human rights group Freedom House. In the past decade, though, the number has crept up by just five.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 12, 2007
BOGOTA, Colombia -- The risky nature of President Bush's trip to this violent country was spelled out on a television monitor aboard Air Force One en route from Uruguay: "Colombia presents THE MOST SIGNIFICANT THREAT ENVIRONMENT of this five country trip!" Listing the terrorist and criminal threats as "High," the message - meant for Bush's security detail but seen by reporters on the plane - underscored the complications Bush is confronting during his weeklong visit to South and Central America.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | March 6, 2007
Friends, I have met the enemy, and be forewarned, he's more concerned with the hard drive than the hard court, more protective of the World Wide Web than the wide world of sports, and he will stop at nothing to cut out the 'Net to keep you from seeing who cuts down the nets. That's right, there are computer technicians currently working around the clock to take away our inalienable right to Internet access at work during the NCAA tournament. I know what you're thinking, and yes, this is something that was guaranteed in both the Bill of Rights and the Ten Commandments.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2005
School officials and advocacy groups throughout Maryland are watching an age discrimination case that has the potential to affect the coffers of every state school system, as well as employees who think their districts wronged them. At issue is whether workers can sue local school boards in Maryland courts over suspected violations of federal protections, which include the Family and Medical Leave Act and constitutional claims. School officials fear that allowing these lawsuits in state courts would unleash potentially expensive litigation for local school boards.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Sun foreign staff | November 10, 1999
MOSCOW -- Terrifying in its brutality, often indifferent to guilt or innocence, Russia's legal system has organized itself around an unspoken bargain: Policemen are free to torture criminal suspects as much as they like, as long as they make arrests, get confessions and keep their victims quiet.This dark assessment emerges from a two-year investigation carried out by Human Rights Watch into police methods and legal practices across Russia. The 196-page report, "Confessions at Any Cost, Police Torture in Russia," is being published today.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2004
NYALA, Sudan - U.S.-based Human Rights Watch reported yesterday that the Sudanese government had broken its pledge to disarm marauding Arab militias in the Darfur region, allowing them to occupy at least 20 bases, including villages seized from civilians who fled their attacks. In the final days before a United Nations Security Council decision on whether Sudan has made adequate progress toward bringing security to Darfur, the rights group, seeking to increase pressure for tough action against the government, called for the imposition of U.N. sanctions.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - Iraqi civilians are being arrested arbitrarily, tortured while in jail and threatened with indefinite detention unless they pay bribes, according to a study released yesterday by Human Rights Watch. The abuse of detainees has become "routine and commonplace," the group said in its 94-page report, The New Iraq? Torture and Ill Treatment of Detainees in Iraqi Custody. The report said that Iraq's interim government appeared to be either an active participant in the abuses, or "is at least complicit."
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