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By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2011
A $150 million plan to revitalize downtown Baltimore's West Side was rejected Thursday by a city design review panel after local civil rights and preservation leaders warned that it would demolish a key landmark in the history of America's civil rights movement. Baltimore's Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel voted to withhold approval of schematic plans for the Lexington Square retail and housing project until the developers and city officials addressed questions about a proposal to tear down the former Read's Drug Store at Howard and Lexington streets and other buildings within the so-called Superblock.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
The director of Baltimore's African-American history museum on Thursday defended his decision to bar a civil rights leader from an event marking the 50th anniversary of landmark legislation after she questioned the decision to include a convicted murderer among the honorees. A. Skipp Sanders, executive director of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, said he barred Helena Hicks, 80, from the premises last week because he "could not be assured that she would be respectful and courteous to other panel members and in the presence of our audience" and "she might not be tolerant.
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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | October 19, 1994
Civil rights leaders in Annapolis are organizing a demonstration to counter a Ku Klux Klan rally scheduled for Oct. 29 at Lawyers Mall in front of the State House.As the Klansmen demonstrate on one side of town, civil rights groups will march down Main Street, then congregate at the First Baptist Church on West Washington St. The counter-protesters say that they will not gather or march near the Klan rally.Klan leaders have predicted that their demonstration could bring about the largest gathering of white supremacists in the city since the 1960s.
NEWS
By Mark Puente and Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Although Baltimore's mayor and police commissioner have asked the U.S. Department of Justice to review allegations of brutality in the Police Department, some civic leaders called Thursday for a more far-reaching — and hard-hitting — federal investigation. Tessa Hill-Aston, president of the NAACP's Baltimore branch, said the police force needs more than the "collaborative review" that city and federal leaders have agreed upon. If city leaders care about improving the department's relationship with residents, the probe "should be a civil rights investigation," she said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 22, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Civil rights leaders and Democrats denounced yesterday a measure that President Bush proposed to replace the anti-discrimination bill passed by the Senate and the House of Representatives.House Democratic leaders said that instead of considering the administration's proposal, the lawmakers would attempt to override President Bush's expected veto of the bill, the Civil Rights Act of 1990.The civil rights bill was approved by majorities in both chambers, but the votes fell short of the number needed to override a veto.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun Karen Hosler of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | October 20, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Civil rights leaders, engaged in last-ditch efforts to convince President Bush to sign into law the proposed Civil Rights Act of 1990, saw a glimmer of a chance yesterday that Mr. Bush might be persuaded not to carry out his threat to veto the measure.As demonstrators marched outside the White House urging Mr. Bush to sign the legislation, the civil rights leaders sought one more meeting with the president before he makes, as they said, "a final decision on this vital and historic legislation."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | July 10, 1991
CIVIL RIGHTS organizations and black leaders are risking their credibility -- and perhaps their future effectiveness -- by temporizing on President Bush's nomination of Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court. It is laughable to imagine that such groups as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People wouldn't already have gone on record against Thomas if he were not black. He is not only outspokenly opposed to their whole approach to civil rights but has spent seven years proving it as an official of hostile Republican administrations.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 24, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Civil rights leaders, devastated over President Bush's veto of the proposed Civil Rights Act of 1990, said yesterday that they are determined to press again for its adoption by Congress next year -- by a margin large enough to withstand another veto.A congressional effort to override Mr. Bush's veto of the current bill is regarded likely to fall short by a slim margin."It was a terrible fight to lose," said the Rev. Benjamin L. Hooks, chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, the 180-organization coalition that led the lobbying for the current bill.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau | September 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A broad spectrum of civil rights leaders who rarely appear together gathered here yesterday for a discussion of racism in America and worked hard to project an image of unity. But they didn't succeed in eliminating the tensions among them.Assembled on a Washington stage were two-time presidential candidate Jesse L. Jackson; Benjamin Chavis, the new leader of the NAACP; and Louis Farrakhan, controversial leader of the Nation of Islam, along with Rep. Kweise Mfume, the Baltimore Democrat who is chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, and Rep. Maxine Waters of California, who is a member of the Black Caucus.
NEWS
August 28, 1998
THE LESSON of the conviction of the Ku Klux Klan leader who ordered the 1966 murder of Vernon Dahmer is that times are not what they used to be. Thank God. No Mississippi jury 30 years ago would convict a white man of killing an African-American.Sam Bowers ordered fellow Klansmen to do a "No. 4" on Mr. Dahmer. The home of the Hattiesburg, Miss., NAACP leader was set on fire. He died fighting the blaze. Bowers ordered the deed. He was tried three times. Each trial ended with a hung jury.Mr.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 28, 2014
  You've probably never heard of Claudette Colvin. And yet, had history twisted in a slightly different direction, she might loom as large in American memory as Rosa Parks does now while Parks herself would be a little-remembered seamstress. Ms. Colvin, you see, did what Parks did, nine months before Parks did it. In March of 1955, the African-American high school girl refused to surrender her seat on a Montgomery, Alabama, bus. Local civil rights leaders had been seeking a test case around which to build their fight against segregation on the buses and briefly considered rallying around her. But it turned out Ms. Colvin had used some pungent language in defending her right to her seat.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Baltimore police plan to deploy officers around city schools until the school year ends to ensure student safety amid recent racial tensions, while school officials joined civil rights leaders to urge students of different races to peacefully resolve differences. The actions followed recent threats and violent attacks on Latino students as well as the Memorial Day robbery and murder of a 15-year-old Mexican student who had dropped out of high school to help his family. Black and Hispanic leaders called for peace at a news conference Monday afternoon, before police deployed several officers to Federal Hill near Digital Harbor High School to deter groups of students from fighting in the streets.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Each February, Larry White helps young people transform themselves into Rosa Parks, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights leaders to share stories of African-American history with others in Anne Arundel County. These days, White is busy planning his third annual Black History Month program, which he hopes will attract 200 people eager to learn not only about the past, but about how black leaders influence current events. "We don't just put on a show. We dig down so people can make a difference," said White, a Glen Burnie resident who holds two jobs in addition to his volunteer work.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Joe DeFilippo felt so moved reading about slain Baltimore Civil Rights worker William Lewis Moore that he wrote a song about the postal worker who was killed 50 years ago in Alabama. DeFilippo, a 36-year Baltimore County Public Schools teacher, felt inspired to write "400 miles" about Moore after reading the June 2 story  in The Baltimore Sun about Moore's unsolved murder. Moore, 35, was killed on April 23, 1963, while on a one-man Civil Rights demonstration where he set out to walk from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., to hand deliver a letter to the governor of Mississippi asking him to reverse his stance on segregation.
NEWS
February 5, 2013
On Saturday, Feb. 2, Baltimore memorialized the Rev. Vernon N. Dobson and recognized him as a giant in the history of the local civil rights struggle ("Civil rights leader founded BUILD," Jan. 27). Testimony was given of his efforts to desegregate Gwynn Oak Park in 1963, creation of the Maryland Food Bank in 1968 and, in the 1970s, the founding of Baltimoreans United In Leadership Development. He was lauded for his work in planning the 1963 March on Washington and his marching with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. from Selma to Montgomery, Ala. in 1965.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
The Rev. Vernon Dobson, a Baptist minister and civil rights leader, died Saturday of complications of a stroke. He was 89. As a leading figure in Baltimore's civil rights movement, Mr. Dobson lived a life molded by the struggle for equality — a struggle he continued into his last years — and as a pastor who believed that the church should play an important part in the fight. Campaigning took a hold on Mr. Dobson's life early on. Talking to The Baltimore Sun in 1998, he described demonstrating against segregation as a young child with his mother in the 1930s.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1998
Before Martin Luther King Jr. marched on Washington and before he sang "We Shall Overcome" on national television, Baltimore's civil rights leaders had picketed segregated downtown coffee shops and demonstrated to integrate the Johns Hopkins University.But such details are little-known because the city's -- and state's -- civil rights history has not been fully written.Which makes yesterday's gathering so remarkable.Perched on metal folding chairs in a church hall and rubbing their bald and grayed pates, a dozen who led Baltimore's struggle for equality more than a generation ago talked about the blood shed and the insults taken.
NEWS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
Lord Nickens, a long-time civil rights leader from Frederick, has died at age 99. Nickens fought for fair housing rules and served as the president of the Frederick branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People for more than 20 years. "He fought for the right of African Americans to pursue the American Dream and helped ensure equality for all Americans," U.S. Senator Ben Cardin said in a statement. " … Lord Nickens was an inspiration for all who knew him; his advocacy on behalf of the African-American community helped to change our nation.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
Carl O. Snowden, the civil rights chief for the state attorney general, was found guilty Tuesday on a misdemeanor marijuana possession charge after being found in April in a car that police said reeked of the drug. Judge Michael W. Reed sentenced Snowden, 59, on the spot to a 60-day suspended prison term and a year's probation with drug and alcohol screening, and ordered him to repay court costs. He will have an opportunity after successfully completing the year's probation to overturn the conviction.
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