Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRights Laws
IN THE NEWS

Rights Laws

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 12, 1993
DENVER -- A challenge to the constitutionality of a Colorado measure forbidding legal protection for homosexuals begins today in a state district court here.The measure, which put this state at the center of a national debate over gay rights laws, has never been put into effect. Denver District Judge Jeffrey Bayless, who issued an injunction in January preventing the law's enforcement, will preside over the trial.In ordering the injunction, Judge Bayless said: "There is a fundamental right here, and it is the right not to have the state endorse and give effect to private biases."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 2, 2014
Two years ago, Republican Del. Neil Parrott and MdPetitions.com had become so adept at petitioning Maryland laws to referendum that some Democrats, Gov. Martin O'Malley included, urged the General Assembly to make it tougher to do. How foolish that looks now. Over the weekend, the conservative group came up short in its efforts to petition to referendum the transgender rights law passed this year by the legislature. MdPetitions.com had only to produce 18,500 signatures by midnight on Saturday - a goal the organization had little trouble meeting previously when it petitioned same-sex marriage or Maryland's version of the Dream Act in recent years.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court begins a new term Monday, with federal civil rights laws likely to collide repeatedly with the majority justices' hardening views against wide-ranging laws passed by Congress.For eight terms -- the entire time that the present majority of five conservative justices has served together -- those five have combined to cast doubt on or strike down broad federal statutes.But, with one exception, the laws that have fallen or become sharply narrowed were not designed to protect civil rights.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
Commentator Sidney Rocke laments that "Maryland Del. Joe Vallario rules the House Judiciary Committee with an iron fist" ("A dictator in the House?" May 5). After the murder of Stephanie Roper 32 years ago, Delegate Vallario stepped up and has been the lead sponsor of victims' rights legislation in the Maryland House of Delegates - first for the Stephanie Roper Committee Inc., and now for its successor, the Maryland Crime Victims' Resource Center. Listed on MCVRC's website under "Law and Policy" is a compilation of victims' rights laws in Maryland, most of which were sponsored by Mr. Vallario.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Andrea F. Siegel and Michael Dresser and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2001
A bill banning discrimination against homosexuals became state law yesterday after organizers of a campaign to overturn the legislation admitted they did not gather enough valid signatures to force a referendum. The measure took effect at 3:31 p.m., when Judge Eugene M. Lerner of Anne Arundel Circuit Court approved an agreement reached by opponents and advocates earlier in the day. "I'm glad you were able to work it out," Lerner said, shaking the hands of lawyers Charles J. Butler and Dwight H. Sullivan, who represented gay rights organizations.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 15, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Saying the "real and ultimate agenda" of the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division is to "reclaim the American conscience," Deval Patrick was sworn in to lead the division.Mr. Patrick, 37, takes over the division that enforces the nation's civil rights laws on matters ranging from race to disabilities. His ascension follows a long and frustrating search by the Clinton administration, which included the withdrawal of the nomination of University of Pennsylvania law professor Lani Guinier.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | April 30, 1993
It may be a politically incorrect risk to disagree with those hundreds of thousands of homosexual demonstrators who gathered in Washington, but, no, this decade definitely will not be remembered as "The Gay '90s."That's because there are so many more people in this country who have far worse problems than do homosexual men and lesbians.Consider the issues that were raised at the Washington rally: the right to serve in the military; repealing state sodomy laws; allowing gay marriages; specific civil rights laws for sexual orientation; and more money for AIDS research.
NEWS
By Denton L. Watson | May 15, 1998
THE announcement by Ward Connerly, a black Californian, and a group of other conservatives that they were forming a commission on race as a counterpoint to President Clinton's panel, which they charged was conducting a monologue rather than a dialogue, again underscores the sharp shift in the civil rights terrain.With the exception of the White Citizens' Council, the equivalent of manicured Kluxism in the South that was formed in 1955 to battle the Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education decision, no group in modern memory has so cynically attempted to derail civil rights efforts.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton took advantage of Congress' absence to name NAACP lawyer Bill Lann Lee to the Justice Department's top civil rights post yesterday, despite the objections of Republicans who complain he is too staunchly supportive of affirmative action."
NEWS
By THOMAS J. SEESS | April 25, 1993
The Reconstruction-era civil rights laws under which Los Angeles police officers Stacey C. Koon and Laurence M. Powell were convicted for the beating of Rodney King, although originally passed to define and protect the rights of newly-freed slaves, have once again proved to be no mere relics of another age.One, Section 242 of Title 18 of the United States Code, originally part of the Civil Rights Act of 1866, prohibits violations of a person's civil rights...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
A conservative group will try to collect enough signatures to force a referendum on a law approved by the General Assembly this year protecting the rights of transgender individuals. MDPetitions.com, founded and led by Republican Del. Neil Parrott of Washington County, announced Tuesday that it is launching an effort to put the law on the November ballot. If the group collects enough signatures, voters would decide whether to uphold or overrule the law. The legislation passed both the Senate and House of Delegates by wide margins over the opposition of most Republicans and some socially conservative Democrats, and Gov. Martin O'Malley has said he will sign it. It is scheduled to take effect Oct. 1, but if it goes to referendum, the law would be delayed pending the outcome.
NEWS
May 15, 2013
Tomorrow, Gov. Martin O'Malley plans to sign into law the most comprehensive gun control legislation Maryland has seen in at least 25 years, a bill that will not only help guard against a mass shooting incident, like December's massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, but will also help fight the day-to-day violence that plagues Baltimore and other communities. The bill has become doubly important with the failure - at least for the moment - of attempts to tighten gun laws on the federal level, both because it will make Marylanders safer and because it can serve as a model for other states as they seek ways to address gun violence.
NEWS
By Bonnita Spikes | April 12, 2011
This is National Crime Victims' Rights Week -- a time for the nation and our state to ask about the meaning of justice, both present and future, for those harmed by crime. Our theme this year, "Reshaping the Future, Honoring the Past," calls on us to not only reflect, but also to act. Our first duty is to never forget the impact of crime. I am a crime victim. My husband, Michael, was murdered in a convenience store robbery in 1994. I was left to raise our four boys on my own. I'm happy to report that they have all become wonderful, productive adult men despite what they lost that day. But, even now, the anniversary of that day can bring us to our knees.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 28, 2008
WASHINGTON - To the surprise of civil rights advocates, the Supreme Court strengthened workplace anti-discrimination laws yesterday, ruling that employees who say they were punished for complaining of bias can sue for damages. In a pair of decisions, the court concluded that claims of retaliation are covered by long-standing civil rights laws, even though this kind of discrimination was not mentioned specifically in the statutes. This expansion of employee rights stands in sharp contrast to a series of pro-business rulings limiting the rights of workers that were made last year by the Supreme Court.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 2004
LONDON - Britain's highest court ruled yesterday that the British government cannot indefinitely detain foreigners suspected of terrorism without charging or trying them. It called the process a violation of European human rights laws. A specially convened panel of judges in the Law Lords ruled 8-1 in favor of nine foreign, Muslim men who have been in detention, most of them in Belmarsh Prison in London, for as long as three years. The prison has been called "Britain's Guantanamo" by human rights groups.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Andrea F. Siegel and Michael Dresser and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2001
A bill banning discrimination against homosexuals became state law yesterday after organizers of a campaign to overturn the legislation admitted they did not gather enough valid signatures to force a referendum. The measure took effect at 3:31 p.m., when Judge Eugene M. Lerner of Anne Arundel Circuit Court approved an agreement reached by opponents and advocates earlier in the day. "I'm glad you were able to work it out," Lerner said, shaking the hands of lawyers Charles J. Butler and Dwight H. Sullivan, who represented gay rights organizations.
NEWS
May 23, 1993
The Clinton administration may be on the verge of undermining federal enforcement of civil rights after 12 years of Reagan-Bush neglect and regression. Instead of restoring the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division to its proper role as vigorous guardian of minority rights, it is about to embroil that beleaguered office in a troubling quarrel. President Clinton has nominated a brilliant but provocative law professor, Lani Guinier, to become assistant attorney general in charge of civil rights.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
Commentator Sidney Rocke laments that "Maryland Del. Joe Vallario rules the House Judiciary Committee with an iron fist" ("A dictator in the House?" May 5). After the murder of Stephanie Roper 32 years ago, Delegate Vallario stepped up and has been the lead sponsor of victims' rights legislation in the Maryland House of Delegates - first for the Stephanie Roper Committee Inc., and now for its successor, the Maryland Crime Victims' Resource Center. Listed on MCVRC's website under "Law and Policy" is a compilation of victims' rights laws in Maryland, most of which were sponsored by Mr. Vallario.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2001
A group that opposes Maryland's gay rights law appears poised to end its months-long fight to force a statewide referendum on the issue. Lawyers for the group, TakeBackMaryland.org, and for gay rights advocates were in negotiations yesterday. The talks were focused on finding a graceful way for the group to give up its effort to put the gay rights law before voters next fall, according to sources familiar with the negotiations. Neither side would comment publicly on the talks yesterday.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
An Anne Arundel County judge is expected to decide Dec. 17 whether Maryland's gay rights law will go to referendum in next year's election. Circuit Judge Eugene M. Lerner set the hearing date yesterday. He is presiding over a lawsuit filed by supporters of the law, who contend that petitions calling for the referendum contain invalid signatures and should be thrown out. The judge also issued an order yesterday that requires the referendum's backers to pay part of the $40,000 fee of a special master, who was hired by the court to review petition signatures.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.