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By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | November 2, 1991
BEIJING -- China yesterday released a strongly worded counterattack on Western criticism of its human rights abuses in the form of a "white paper" detailing often spurious claims of marked progress in providing political freedoms here.Western diplomats said it represents an effort to head off the growing U.S. political debate on whether the United States should continue to extend to China a favorable trade status absent improvement in China's human-rights record."In a way it's a positive sign in that they're at least putting their position on paper," said one Western envoy of the 62-page statement -- China's first official definition of human rights.
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NEWS
December 18, 2012
Neil Simon's column on the new U.S.-Russia trade law could not be further from the truth when it states that Sen. Benjamin Cardin has "catapulted human rights atop the international agenda ("Cardin stands up for rights," Dec. 12). Senator Cardin talks about freedom and democracy for everyone except the Palestinians, who have been suffering under a brutal Israeli occupation for 45 years. They have been victims of land and water theft, home demolitions, targeted assassinations, mass arrests, torture and a blockade of Gaza that is strangling the civilian population.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 28, 2000
CAIRO, Egypt -- In a sharply worded report, Amnesty International accused Saudi Arabia yesterday of widespread human rights abuses, including arbitrary arrests, the torture of detainees and the barring of prisoners' access to family members or lawyers. The group said it had received and published graphic accounts of mistreatment, discrimination against religious minorities and suppression of political dissent in the gulf kingdom for years. But Saudi Arabia has escaped international condemnation for its record, Amnesty International officials said, because oil-dependent nations such as the United States have not wanted to offend the kingdom's rulers.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
Ten volunteers have become sworn Court Appointed Special Advocates this month for Maryland's abused and neglected children. The volunteers have completed 30 hours of classroom training coupled with at least two hours of court observation to qualify to work on behalf of the state's foster children to ensure their rights are protected as the state seeks to find them permanent homes. The new CASA volunteers are Doris Barnes, of Monkton; Peggy Nicholson and Lela M. Yorbor, both of Woodlawn; Natalie Snell, of Randallstown; Corryne Deliberto, of Rodgers Forge; Lyn Biller, Stacey Gallina and Jennifer Keeney, of Westminster; Anne Chiolo of Finksburg; and Russell Bailey of Gettysburg, Pa. Nicholson, a former analyst with the Social Security Administration, said she felt as though it was "my obligation to give back to the community that has been so good to me. " To Chiolo, a mother of two boys, the opportunity is rewarding.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 21, 1995
TEGUCIGALPA -- The attorney for three military officers sought in connection with human rights abuses during the 1980s asked the Honduran Court of Appeals yesterday to void arrest warrants issued against his clients.The fugitives are believed to be former members of a CIA-trained military unit called Battalion 316. The battalion stalked, kidnapped, tortured and murdered hundreds of suspected leftists during the 1980s as the Reagan administration sought to wipe out communism in Central America.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Massachusetts' move to show its displeasure over human rights abuses in Myanmar -- formerly Burma -- by boycotting companies doing business there ran headlong into a judicial obstacle yesterday: the Supreme Court. In a one-hour hearing, most of the justices who took an active part appeared to be concerned that the state was trying to use its buying power to conduct foreign policy, a role reserved by the Constitution to the national government. Only Justice Antonin Scalia spoke up frequently in sympathy for Massachusetts' aim, saying he found nothing in the Constitution "that bars states from trying to influence foreign policy."
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2004
About half of the doctors surveyed in southern Iraq last summer said their peers had participated in an array of human rights abuses - including cutting off ears, falsifying death certificates and even removing patients' organs without their consent. Of the nearly 100 physicians interviewed at three civilian hospitals, the majority reported that doctors were forced to participate in the abuses under threats from various groups that ranged from losing their jobs to outright execution. "This goes completely against what physicians normally do, which is to `do no harm,' " said Dr. Lynn L. Amowitz, senior medical researcher for the Boston-based Physicians for Human Rights, which conducted the study.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | March 29, 1991
BEIJING -- As part of a continuing American effort to pressure China on its human rights abuses, two U.S. congressmen said yesterday they warned Chinese Premier Li Peng that Congress is likely to link China's favorable trading status to improved treatment of Chinese political and religious dissidents.In an hourlong meeting with Mr. Li yesterday afternoon, the two U.S. representatives said they gave him a petition signed by 110 members of Congress, asking him to set free 77 Chinese who have been imprisoned, detained or put under house arrest for their religious activities.
NEWS
By GINGER THOMPSON and GINGER THOMPSON,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 17, 1995
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- The most talked about issue on this country's popular Radio America call-in show these days is the investigation of 10 military officers accused of human rights abuses during the 1980s, when a CIA-trained military unit called Battalion 316 was kidnapping, torturing and murdering suspected subversives.Carlos Lopez Osorio, lead attorney for the accused officers, calls in. "My clients should be pardoned!" he insists, invoking a 1991 amnesty decree that pardons political crimes.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | September 4, 1991
BEIJING -- British Prime Minister John Major, the first Wester leader to visit here since the Tiananmen Square massacre two years ago, lectured Chinese Premier Li Peng at length yesterday on the world's concerns about human rights abuses in China.At one point, Mr. Major cited a letter that he received from an opposition member of the British Parliament in order to illustrate "the strength of concerns about human rights that exist across all strands of opinion in my country," he said later.
NEWS
By Kim Jensen | May 2, 2011
I just returned from a 10-day human rights delegation to Colombia sponsored by Witness for Peace. While we were in the midst of our intensive meetings in Valle del Cauca, Northern Cauca, and Bogota, we discovered that a high profile-American delegation had just arrived in the capital for its own two-day tour. The U.S. Congressional Ways and Means Committee had sent a bipartisan fact-finding mission to Colombia, co-sponsored by Maryland Rep. Steny Hoyer. What an amazing coincidence: two American delegations were gathering facts about Colombia at the same time.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- New York Attorney General Andrew M. Cuomo, whose scrutiny of student loans has exposed ties between universities and lenders, said yesterday that he was broadening his investigation to examine the criteria lenders use when making loans and whether they violate civil rights statutes. Testifying at a Senate Banking Committee hearing on private student loans, which do not carry federal guarantees, Cuomo said he was examining whether lenders were discriminating against students based on the institutions they attended or other factors not directly related to their credit history.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 13, 2007
UNITED NATIONS -- A high-level U.N. mission to Darfur said yesterday that the Sudanese government had orchestrated human rights crimes against its own people and urged that leaders of Sudan's government and militias be charged with war crimes. But Khartoum is blocking United Nations attempts to stem the violence, organizing opposition to the mission's report and stepping back from its agreement to accept a joint U.N.-African peacekeeping force in the region. Sudan's government "has manifestly failed to protect the population of Darfur from large-scale international crimes, and has itself orchestrated and participated in these crimes," according to a report commissioned by the U.N. Human Rights Council.
NEWS
June 7, 2006
The decision by the United States last week to increase pressure on Myanmar by seeking a U.N. Security Council resolution against its continuing human rights abuses is necessary and laudable. But the negative reactions of key world powers to the U.S. diplomatic escalation are distressingly toothless. China, Russia and, shockingly, Japan reportedly argued in a closed Security Council meeting last Wednesday that the lack of political freedoms in the country formerly known as Burma doesn't pose a threat to world security - and therefore doesn't meet the test for such a resolution.
NEWS
By CAM SIMPSON AND LIZ SLY and CAM SIMPSON AND LIZ SLY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- U.S. officials are doling out millions of dollars of arms and ammunition to Iraqi police units without safeguards required to ensure they are complying with American laws that ban taxpayer-financed assistance for foreign security forces engaged in human-rights violations, according to an internal State Department review. The previously undisclosed review shows that officials failed to take steps to comply with the laws over the past two years, amid mounting reports of torture and murder by Shiite-dominated Iraqi security forces.
NEWS
By RON SILVER AND DAVID BOSSIE | September 28, 2005
WASHINGTON -- As the United Nations celebrates its 60th anniversary as a symbol of peace and a beacon of hope, we must offer a frank and critical assessment of its failure to deliver on the promise to halt global human rights abuses, improve economic and social development and significantly enhance world security. In all three categories, the United Nations has either ignored its charter mandate or has been so overwhelmed with bureaucracy, ineptitude, corruption and inefficiency that it could not carry out its mission.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
For years, civil rights attorney Jennifer Kristina Harbury has helped Guatemalans in danger. Today, she is frustrated that she can't help her husband who she says is imprisoned in a Guatemalan prison."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 3, 1999
SANTIAGO, Chile -- The arrest of Gen. Augusto Pinochet in London a year ago has opened a quiet and long-postponed reckoning in Chile over its years of dictatorship that is finally bringing former military officers to task for the deaths or disappearances of thousands of political opponents. Since the arrest of Pinochet, the former dictator, 25 officers have been arrested on charges of murder, torture and kidnapping, including a member of one of the juntas that helped rule the country for 17 years after 1973.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 30, 2005
BEIJING - Chinese police raided the office of an American-financed human rights group shortly before the arrival of the U.N. human rights chief yesterday, as authorities sought to keep a rein on dissent during the visit. Police searched the offices and copied computer files at the Empowerment and Rights Institute, a leading legal and human rights advisory group, employees and visitors to the offices said. The group's director, Hou Wenzhuo, said that as many as 10 plainclothes and uniformed police came to her home as well but did not arrest her. The raid came shortly before Louise Arbour, the U.N. high commissioner for human rights, arrived in Beijing to discuss China's rights record with senior Communist Party officials.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | February 22, 2005
`DUTIFUL" IS A word this newspaper used Sunday to describe John Dimitri Negroponte, the 65-year-old career diplomat President Bush named last week to be the first director of national intelligence. It was in an editorial that otherwise had little good to say about the man, and I think the word best characterizes the image that comes to mind when Mr. Negroponte is mentioned. He is a dutiful servant. One thinks of him as America's representative to the United Nations, sitting dutifully behind Colin L. Powell as the secretary of state testified incorrectly about the threat Iraq posed to the world.
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