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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1997
Behind some of cinema's most vivid and heroic women characters in recent years is a British director with a gray bristle of beard on his chin and a Cuban cigar in his mouth.He launched Sigourney Weaver's Ripley on the first of her battles against rapacious aliens and later set Thelma and Louise loose on their journey of female rebellion. In "G.I. Jane," which opens Friday, he's poised to unleash a heavily muscled, shaven-headed, gutter-talking Demi Moore on the most male of preserves, the SEALS, the Navy's special-forces unit.
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October 26, 2007
Next Friday AMERICAN GANGSTER -- (Universal Studios) Denzel Washington's a Harlem drug lord, and Russell Crowe's a cop out to take him down. Ridley Scott directs. BEE MOVIE -- (Paramount Pictures) Jerry Seinfeld leads the voice cast in the animated tale of a bee who sues humanity for stealing honey. With Renee Zellweger. BLADE RUNNER: THE FINAL CUT -- (Warner Bros.) Director Ridley Scott releases another version of the classic science fiction film. Starring Harrison Ford and Daryl Hannah.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 1, 2005
Westerns indigenous to England" is how Ridley Scott - the director of Alien, Thelma & Louise, and Black Hawk Down - described knight-in-shining-armor movies when he spoke of making one a quarter-century ago. Scott sprinkles showdowns aplenty throughout the medieval Jerusalem of his new film, Kingdom of Heaven, which opens Friday. Holy war beckons the Christian soldiers of the Crusades to expand their power base in the Holy Land and fight the Saracen warriors of Saladin, the unifier of the Muslim world.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 8, 2007
Yesterday, while Russell Crowe was winning his best set of reviews in years for his tour-de-force villainy in 3:10 to Yuma, he was also playing a soccer dad in Annapolis. It was his first day of shooting on the international espionage thriller Body of Lies, and Crowe was doing two scenes at St. Andrew's United Methodist Day School: easing into the carpool area and watching one of his two fictional kids play soccer. Costarring Leonardo DiCaprio as a CIA agent determined to disrupt a terrorist network and Crowe as his boss, Body of Lies, adapted by William Monahan (The Departed)
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 2, 1996
Ridley Scott, the visual dynamo behind "Blade Runner" and "Alien," just to name a few, has a tall ship and a star to steer her by; he just doesn't have much of a script.Scott understands outsides as well as any director around, but his work always has a profound emotional emptiness, because he's not too swift at what's going on inside.Thus his gorgeous sailing yarn "White Squall" appears to be a movie obsessed with the physical universe, the actual outsideness of things. It's all texture, sensual information, excitement, all so brilliantly packaged that you can almost smell the salt and feel the spray.
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By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1997
Mel Gibson has been Hamlet. Kevin Costner has been Robin Hood. Woody Allen has been a romantic lead.Stranger things have happened in Hollywood than Demi Moore playing a Navy SEAL, as she does in "G.I. Jane." Director Ridley Scott's preach-athon doggedly insists women (especially surgically enhanced ones) can endure the military's most rigorous physical and mental program: Navy SEAL (sea, air, land) training.But the casting of Moore isn't what has retired SEAL Tom Hawkins up in arms about the movie.
FEATURES
October 26, 2007
Next Friday AMERICAN GANGSTER -- (Universal Studios) Denzel Washington's a Harlem drug lord, and Russell Crowe's a cop out to take him down. Ridley Scott directs. BEE MOVIE -- (Paramount Pictures) Jerry Seinfeld leads the voice cast in the animated tale of a bee who sues humanity for stealing honey. With Renee Zellweger. BLADE RUNNER: THE FINAL CUT -- (Warner Bros.) Director Ridley Scott releases another version of the classic science fiction film. Starring Harrison Ford and Daryl Hannah.
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By Knight-Ridder | March 3, 1992
Ridley Scott's "true cut" of "Blade Runner," originally slated for release this month, has been pushed back to fall so the Oscar-nominated director (for "Thelma & Louise") can further refine his re-edit of his 1982 science fiction thriller starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Daryl Hannah and Sean Young.Mr Scott needs to finish "Christopher Columbus," with Gerard Depardieu in the title role, first.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2006
Ideal cold-weather entertainment - that's the best to be said about A Good Year, starring Russell Crowe as a ruthless London bond trader who inherits a chateau and vineyard in Provence from his uncle (Albert Finney) and rediscovers his soul. In some ways, Fox has been advertising this movie the way MGM sold Ninotchka - instead of proclaiming "Garbo Laughs!" the poster shots prove that Russell Crowe can grin. I still root for Crowe; he's got untapped versatility and complexity. It's good to see him acting goofy after the toil of Cinderella Man. But the comic spirit doesn't possess him here the way it did in Rough Magic 10 years ago, the way it does Finney and young Freddie Highmore (playing Crowe as a kid)
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By Lou Cedrone | May 24, 1991
''Thelma and Louise'' means to be the female version of ''Bonnie and Clyde'' or ''Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.'' It has elements of both but doesn't do that much with them.Yes, the new film has been handsomely photographed, has some great performances and some very funny passages, but overall the movie fails, probably because the viewer eventually loses sympathy with the lead characters.''Thelma and Louise'' is a road picture. That is, most of the action takes place on the road, and this much is authentic.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2006
Ideal cold-weather entertainment - that's the best to be said about A Good Year, starring Russell Crowe as a ruthless London bond trader who inherits a chateau and vineyard in Provence from his uncle (Albert Finney) and rediscovers his soul. In some ways, Fox has been advertising this movie the way MGM sold Ninotchka - instead of proclaiming "Garbo Laughs!" the poster shots prove that Russell Crowe can grin. I still root for Crowe; he's got untapped versatility and complexity. It's good to see him acting goofy after the toil of Cinderella Man. But the comic spirit doesn't possess him here the way it did in Rough Magic 10 years ago, the way it does Finney and young Freddie Highmore (playing Crowe as a kid)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 1, 2005
Westerns indigenous to England" is how Ridley Scott - the director of Alien, Thelma & Louise, and Black Hawk Down - described knight-in-shining-armor movies when he spoke of making one a quarter-century ago. Scott sprinkles showdowns aplenty throughout the medieval Jerusalem of his new film, Kingdom of Heaven, which opens Friday. Holy war beckons the Christian soldiers of the Crusades to expand their power base in the Holy Land and fight the Saracen warriors of Saladin, the unifier of the Muslim world.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 28, 2002
AFP: American Fighter Pilot is a classic example of what U.S. media does better than almost anything: Create myths that make us feel better about ourselves as a nation. CBS is billing the show that premieres tomorrow night as a "new reality series" from directors Tony Scott (Top Gun) and Ridley Scott (Black Hawk Down). In terms of structure, it is a reality series in the way that it follows three young Air Force officers through 110 days of Top Gun training to become F-15 fighter pilots, the elite of elite.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1997
Mel Gibson has been Hamlet. Kevin Costner has been Robin Hood. Woody Allen has been a romantic lead.Stranger things have happened in Hollywood than Demi Moore playing a Navy SEAL, as she does in "G.I. Jane." Director Ridley Scott's preach-athon doggedly insists women (especially surgically enhanced ones) can endure the military's most rigorous physical and mental program: Navy SEAL (sea, air, land) training.But the casting of Moore isn't what has retired SEAL Tom Hawkins up in arms about the movie.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1997
Behind some of cinema's most vivid and heroic women characters in recent years is a British director with a gray bristle of beard on his chin and a Cuban cigar in his mouth.He launched Sigourney Weaver's Ripley on the first of her battles against rapacious aliens and later set Thelma and Louise loose on their journey of female rebellion. In "G.I. Jane," which opens Friday, he's poised to unleash a heavily muscled, shaven-headed, gutter-talking Demi Moore on the most male of preserves, the SEALS, the Navy's special-forces unit.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 2, 1996
Ridley Scott, the visual dynamo behind "Blade Runner" and "Alien," just to name a few, has a tall ship and a star to steer her by; he just doesn't have much of a script.Scott understands outsides as well as any director around, but his work always has a profound emotional emptiness, because he's not too swift at what's going on inside.Thus his gorgeous sailing yarn "White Squall" appears to be a movie obsessed with the physical universe, the actual outsideness of things. It's all texture, sensual information, excitement, all so brilliantly packaged that you can almost smell the salt and feel the spray.
FEATURES
By Glenn Lovell and Glenn Lovell,Knight-Ridder | May 17, 1991
IT'S BEEN A long time coming, but the loutish male of the species finally is getting his comeuppance on the big screen. Suddenly, Hollywood is catering to the not-so-private fantasies of America's neglected and abused wives. And judging from the response to "Sleeping With the Enemy" and "Mortal Thoughts," a sizable audience is eager to applaud the systematic humiliation -- even murder -- of the opposite sex.But the strongest bit of feminist wish-fulfillment is yet to come. It is "Thelma & Louise," which opens May 24. In a clever fusing of "Easy Rider" and "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," director Ridley Scott ("Alien")
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 8, 2007
Yesterday, while Russell Crowe was winning his best set of reviews in years for his tour-de-force villainy in 3:10 to Yuma, he was also playing a soccer dad in Annapolis. It was his first day of shooting on the international espionage thriller Body of Lies, and Crowe was doing two scenes at St. Andrew's United Methodist Day School: easing into the carpool area and watching one of his two fictional kids play soccer. Costarring Leonardo DiCaprio as a CIA agent determined to disrupt a terrorist network and Crowe as his boss, Body of Lies, adapted by William Monahan (The Departed)
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | March 3, 1992
Ridley Scott's "true cut" of "Blade Runner," originally slated for release this month, has been pushed back to fall so the Oscar-nominated director (for "Thelma & Louise") can further refine his re-edit of his 1982 science fiction thriller starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Daryl Hannah and Sean Young.Mr Scott needs to finish "Christopher Columbus," with Gerard Depardieu in the title role, first.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 24, 1991
''Thelma and Louise'' means to be the female version of ''Bonnie and Clyde'' or ''Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.'' It has elements of both but doesn't do that much with them.Yes, the new film has been handsomely photographed, has some great performances and some very funny passages, but overall the movie fails, probably because the viewer eventually loses sympathy with the lead characters.''Thelma and Louise'' is a road picture. That is, most of the action takes place on the road, and this much is authentic.
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