Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRidgely S Delight
IN THE NEWS

Ridgely S Delight

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | January 24, 2005
While some of Baltimore's historic churches sit vacant and in need of new occupants, one has found a new calling. The former Columbia Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church in Ridgely's Delight will live on as part of a new residential development called Ridgely Commons. The 1844 structure at 657 Washington Blvd. is being transformed into four two-story condominiums, with features such as skylights, dramatic stairways and open-plan kitchens. At the rear of the church property, builders are constructing two houses and 12 off-street parking spaces, including six garages.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 12, 2010
Geraldine B. "Jerry" Clutz, a homemaker and former longtime Arnold resident, died Tuesday of cancer at a son's Ridgely's Delight home. She was 81. Geraldine B. Snyder was born and raised in Baltimore, where she attended city public schools. Before her marriage in the 1940s, she worked as an assembly line worker for the National Biscuit Co. and later in the accounting department of the Montgomery Ward facility on Monroe Street. She was married in 1947 to Richard G. Clutz Sr., a roofer for Anne Arundel County's public schools.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer Staff writer Rafael Alvarez contributed to this article | July 13, 1993
On the day before the All-Star Game, Riechl Mayne was coming to the realization that he and his buddies, so sure of their ability to find seats when they arrived from suburban Detroit Friday, just might find themselves without tickets at game time tonight.That would mean the end of a five-year success story for the six men from Warren, Mich., semi-pro players in the National Amateur Baseball Federation who annually jet into the All-Star city and manage to score tickets.But Baltimore is proving tough.
BUSINESS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | May 4, 2008
Paying for college or professional school isn't getting any easier. According to collegeboard.com, most students and their families can expect to pay even more this year on tuition and fees and, on average, $371 to $406 additional for room and board a year, depending on the school. Although parents and students can limit their overall costs by buying used books and applying for financial aid, there are ways to save on housing as well. Renting an off-campus condo or apartment may seem like the most valid option when trying to save, but in the right situation, buying a house near campus -- even with the real estate market in a downturn -- is a viable alternative to shelling out thousands of dollars over the course of a few years without seeing any return.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | April 10, 1992
President Bush's Opening Day visit to Baltimore proved costly to some neighbors of the new Camden Yards stadium when their cars were towed from his motorcade route.Eight Ridgely's Delight residents apparently thought their cars were immune from tickets and tow trucks because they had the new "Area 5" parking permits required for parking there on game days at Oriole Park.Instead, they found the rules changed on short notice in the 500 and 600 blocks of Washington Boulevard. The Police Department posted no-parking signs there during the weekend at the request of the U.S. Secret Service, which provides security for the president.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | March 25, 1992
A drained and dented can of National Bohemian beer lies in the 300 block of Penn St., not far from Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Commemorating Memorial Stadium -- that pile of bricks on 33rd Street the Baltimore Orioles left behind for Oriole Park -- the can says: "A season to remember . . . 1954-1991."Alberta Day lives around the corner in a little Formstone rowhouse on Melvin Street, and the seasons she remembers go back to the early 1960s, back when her husband, Owen, was living, back when the couple enjoyed summer nights together at the ballpark.
BUSINESS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | May 4, 2008
Paying for college or professional school isn't getting any easier. According to collegeboard.com, most students and their families can expect to pay even more this year on tuition and fees and, on average, $371 to $406 additional for room and board a year, depending on the school. Although parents and students can limit their overall costs by buying used books and applying for financial aid, there are ways to save on housing as well. Renting an off-campus condo or apartment may seem like the most valid option when trying to save, but in the right situation, buying a house near campus -- even with the real estate market in a downturn -- is a viable alternative to shelling out thousands of dollars over the course of a few years without seeing any return.
NEWS
August 17, 1994
Area requires help during stadium eventsBased on all the media reports, entertainment lineups and vendor and attendance figures, it is obvious that the AFRAM '94 Festival was a huge success and seems destined for a bigger and better future.Given the quantity and quality of Baltimore's African-American heritage, including industry, politics, civil service, education and many other areas, this destiny is both warranted and necessary as a means of cultural preservation.However, with the apparent indication from local officials that AFRAM has found a home on the grounds of Camden Yards, our city officials must be more pro-active in dealing with the basic logistics of yet another type of "stadium event."
BUSINESS
By Alyssa Gabbay and Alyssa Gabbay,Contributing Writer Staff writer Ellen James Martin contributed to this article | July 19, 1992
The streets start to fill up around 6:30 p.m. Carrying mitts, hats and binoculars, hordes of baseball fans make their way down Conway and Paca streets just as they used to pound the pavement along 33rd Street. And then the roars begin.Since April, residents of Otterbein and Ridgely's Delight have been adjusting to life with a new, imposing neighbor, Oriole Park at Camden Yards.But having a 48,000-seat stadium in their backyard isn't as intrusive as expected, say residents, including many who originally opposed it. It has even provided some advantages.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 12, 2010
Geraldine B. "Jerry" Clutz, a homemaker and former longtime Arnold resident, died Tuesday of cancer at a son's Ridgely's Delight home. She was 81. Geraldine B. Snyder was born and raised in Baltimore, where she attended city public schools. Before her marriage in the 1940s, she worked as an assembly line worker for the National Biscuit Co. and later in the accounting department of the Montgomery Ward facility on Monroe Street. She was married in 1947 to Richard G. Clutz Sr., a roofer for Anne Arundel County's public schools.
BUSINESS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | February 17, 2008
Tucked between Pratt Street, Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Russell Street, the Ridgely's Delight neighborhood has provided shelter to residents of diverse backgrounds since the early 19th century. With its name derived from a plantation owned by Charles Ridgely, Ridgely's Delight was originally inhabited by craftspeople but later became home to affluent professionals who used their resources to make the rowhouses more ornate. Gradual urban decay affected the area in the 1970s, but today the neighborhood is once again an eclectic mix of income levels and backgrounds.
NEWS
By JEAN MARABELLA | May 22, 2007
Carol Ott said the change came when she started to think of them as fellow businesspeople who have set up shop on the main street of the neighborhood just as she has. Only thing is, they sell drugs, and she sells coffee. She had tried calling the police, she tried going to community meetings. Still, they remained. Finally, she took matters into her own hands and laid down her own law. "One was standing outside the restaurant, and I said, `Don't even think about it,'" said Ott, who owns a sweet little coffeehouse and cafe, Evelyn's, on Washington Boulevard in Pigtown.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | May 18, 2007
Rehka Thomas graduates today, four years of pharmacy school behind her and a great party ahead of her, with a cake shaped like a mortar and pestle, and prescription bottle favors with instructions to take two of the candy pills inside to treat a sweet tooth. Like other graduates who scatter once they get their degrees, she, too, plans to leave Baltimore - but in her case, she's leaving with, and because of, an unwanted souvenir: a bullet, embedded in her upper chest where her clavicle and sternum meet.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | January 24, 2005
While some of Baltimore's historic churches sit vacant and in need of new occupants, one has found a new calling. The former Columbia Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church in Ridgely's Delight will live on as part of a new residential development called Ridgely Commons. The 1844 structure at 657 Washington Blvd. is being transformed into four two-story condominiums, with features such as skylights, dramatic stairways and open-plan kitchens. At the rear of the church property, builders are constructing two houses and 12 off-street parking spaces, including six garages.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2002
Two decades ago, Vanessa Ball became one of the first residents of a subsidized apartment project in an area of Southwest Baltimore in the midst of extensive revitalization. Today, the rundown rowhouses that pockmarked Ridgely's Delight have been transformed into spiffy showpieces; the neighborhood is a mix of downtown workers, older residents and student renters from the University of Maryland's Baltimore campus -- and the plot of land abutting the eastern edge of the community is Oriole Park at Camden Yards.
BUSINESS
By Charles Cohen and Charles Cohen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 10, 2001
You've heard the buzz about them a dozen, if not a hundred times, in the last three years. Canton. "Oh, that's hot." Roland Park. "Can you believe those prices." Federal Hill. "Can't find a thing to buy." Guilford. Mount Washington. Otterbein. Butcher's Hill. Although much of the city's real estate boom has focused along the waterfront and upper-crust neighborhoods, there are a number of low-key neighborhoods tucked away throughout the city that are thriving in more subtle ways. These neighborhoods may not be experiencing a Canton-like gold rush, where people - mad for a glimmer of the harbor - aren't hesitating to pay top dollar for homes that two decades ago were considered factory housing.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Richard Irwin contributed to this article | December 25, 1997
Baltimore's homicide count reached 300 for the eighth consecutive year yesterday when a 21-year-old accounting student at the University of Baltimore was found dead in his car with a gunshot wound in his head, police said.Anthony Shelton Lee Jr., who was reported missing by his family Monday, was found dead about 9 a.m. yesterday in a Nissan Maxima at South Fremont Avenue and Portland Street in Ridgely's Delight, a neighborhood west of Oriole Park at Camden Yards.Family members said Lee of the 4600 block of Belvieu Ave. in West Baltimore was to graduate in May.Two other shootings yesterday left two Baltimore men injured.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | March 25, 1992
A drained and dented can of National Bohemian beer lies in the 300 block of Penn St., not far from Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Commemorating Memorial Stadium -- that pile of bricks on 33rd Street the Baltimore Orioles left behind -- -- the can says: "A season to remember . . . 1954-1991."Alberta Day lives around the corner in a little Formstone rowhouse on Melvin Street, and the seasons she remembers go back to the early 1960s, back when her husband, Owen, was living, back when the couple enjoyed summer nights together at the ballpark.
BUSINESS
By Mary E. Medland and Mary E. Medland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 1998
After 29 years as rector of Bolton Hill's Memorial Episcopal Church, Barney Farnham went looking for another Baltimore neighborhood in which to spend his retirement.Although he and his wife loved Bolton Hill, they thought that putting some distance between them and the church would allow the new rector to make his own mark on the parish. "We looked at a lot of other neighborhoods in the city," said Farnham. "Condos weren't for us, parking in Fells Point was bad, and Federal Hill was too pricey."
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Richard Irwin contributed to this article | December 25, 1997
Baltimore's homicide count reached 300 for the eighth consecutive year yesterday when a 21-year-old accounting student at the University of Baltimore was found dead in his car with a gunshot wound in his head, police said.Anthony Shelton Lee Jr., who was reported missing by his family Monday, was found dead about 9 a.m. yesterday in a Nissan Maxima at South Fremont Avenue and Portland Street in Ridgely's Delight, a neighborhood west of Oriole Park at Camden Yards.Family members said Lee of the 4600 block of Belvieu Ave. in West Baltimore was to graduate in May.Two other shootings yesterday left two Baltimore men injured.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.