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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | June 14, 1992
Columbia residents told state Public Service Commission representatives last week that they want the telephone company to leave their numbers alone.The Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co. told 126 residents in the Kendall Ridge neighborhood in the village of Long Reach that it would be changing their numbers to an Ellicott City exchange.Being assigned new numbers is not just an inconvenience, residents told the commission Thursday night; it will be a financial hardship.Those who want to keep their Columbia numbers say they have a Washington-area orientation.
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NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2004
Three years ago Leon and Joyce Kutik moved to the quiet Hickory Crest senior housing development in Columbia to spend their latter years in a home with a back yard bordered by trees, providing a buffer from nearby traffic and noise. But now the Kutiks and some of their neighbors fear their peaceful setting could be compromised by a Walgreens pharmacy that's proposed to be constructed on land that abuts their development and is across the street from the Hickory Ridge Village Center. "It's obviously going to be a source of noise; it won't be as quiet," said Leon Kutik, 77, a retired laboratory manager.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Margaret Bevan is losing patience. For the past five years the North Laurel resident has lived in the unfinished town house development of Pilgrim's Ridge.Ponds of water form in the parking lot when it rains and are filled with tadpoles in the summer. Paving on one road in the 70-unit development is incomplete and potholes dot the parking lot.The developer, John W. Steffey Sr., never completed the project and residents have been waiting since 1989 for the county and the bonding company that secured the project to come to an agreement.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
A piece of land across the street from Hickory Ridge Village Center in Columbia has long been a residential lot -- and the community wants it to stay that way. But the lot's owner, a subsidiary of Mangione Family Enterprises, wants the Howard County Council, through its comprehensive rezoning process, to change the area for commercial use so the family can develop a Walgreens pharmacy. After the village board and residents protested the plan, Louis Mangione, vice president for development of Mangione Family Enterprises, met with residents during a village board meeting Monday night, hoping to reach a compromise and earn their support.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | January 24, 1994
Parr's Ridge residents should receive a tax rebate because they pay for city services they don't receive, said Del. Richard N. Dixon, a Carroll Democrat.Mr. Dixon said he plans to introduce legislation in the General Assembly that would give residents a tax break.Residents of Westminster's only condominium development have been seeking relief for more than a year. They approached Mr. Dixon after efforts to persuade city officials failed.Parr's Ridge is on Pleasanton Road, near Uniontown Road and Route 31, and has 168 units.
NEWS
February 28, 2002
The state Board of Public Works voted yesterday to commit $450,000 to help preserve 111 acres of wooded land in the Bay Ridge community. Board members Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp voted in favor of the proposal. Comptroller William Donald Schaefer abstained, saying Bay Ridge residents should contribute more money to the $4.1 million purchase, given the state's anticipated budget shortfall. Residents have agreed to pay a yearly tax assessment of $250 and have committed more than $900,000.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | March 6, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- Westminster's mayor and City Council would be able to give Parr's Ridge residents a tax break if a bill sponsored by Del. Richard N. Dixon passes the General Assembly.The legislation, heard in committee Friday, would give municipalities the authority to make agreements with privately owned residential communities concerning city services.Residents of Parr's Ridge, a 168-unit condominium development Pleasanton Road, near Uniontown Road and Route 31, have been asking the city for tax relief for more than a year.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1995
Twin Ridge residents crossed a preliminary hurdle this week in their efforts to remove ball field lights from their neighborhood when a Frederick County judge ruled that the homeowners may proceed with their lawsuit against the town of Mount Airy.Circuit Judge John Dryer ruled Tuesday that the lawsuit, filed in October by 16 Twin Ridge residents, was not premature, as the town had claimed."We're very pleased; now we can proceed with the business at hand," said Joseph Glenwood Beall, one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1996
Mount Airy had planned a lighted baseball field at Twin Ridge Elementary School since the late 1980s, town officials said yesterday in the fourth day of testimony in a civil lawsuit brought by neighbors who say they can't live with the field's powerful lights."
NEWS
March 21, 1994
Providing tax relief to Parr's Ridge, Westminster's only condominium development, may make good political sense in an election year, but is it good public policy? No.Del. Richard Dixon's bill that would enable Maryland municipalities to abate taxes to condominiums is moving along smartly in the General Assembly, but it may be taking local governments down a slippery slope.For more than two years, residents of the 168-unit development have been seeking a reprieve from about $16,000 in taxes on the grounds that their condominium association pays for the snow and trash removal and street lighting.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2003
An ordinary decision to seek historic designation is threatening to disrupt the harmony of a picturesque West Baltimore neighborhood. Hunting Ridge residents are sharply divided over whether the area should be named a historic district - a move that encourages preservation with tax breaks for home renovations but imposes strict regulations on how they are done. Finally, 2 1/2 years and 36 community meetings later - one of which included a mediator - Hunting Ridge is a City Council vote from obtaining historic designation.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2003
The Columbia Council re-elected Miles Coffman as its chairman last night to serve a second term in leading the volunteer council. The council voted, 9-0, to elect Coffman, the council's Hickory Ridge representative. Coffman, 53, was the only candidate. "I think that we started a good thing [last year]," said Coffman, who is in his fourth one-year term on the council. "I worked to make sure everybody had a say. I think I treated everybody with respect, and I'll continue to do the same." The council also voted two councilmen - Joshua Feldmark of Wilde Lake and Tom O'Connor of Dorsey's Search - to serve as the council's vice chairmen in six-month terms.
NEWS
February 28, 2002
The state Board of Public Works voted yesterday to commit $450,000 to help preserve 111 acres of wooded land in the Bay Ridge community. Board members Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp voted in favor of the proposal. Comptroller William Donald Schaefer abstained, saying Bay Ridge residents should contribute more money to the $4.1 million purchase, given the state's anticipated budget shortfall. Residents have agreed to pay a yearly tax assessment of $250 and have committed more than $900,000.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2001
When plastic surveyors' ribbons first appeared tied to tulip poplar and oak trees in Bay Ridge, an enclave of old summer cottages and modern mini-mansions southeast of Annapolis, residents got nervous. Then they got organized. About a year later, a few of those ribbons remain. But the surveyors, and all they represent in communities such as this one once targeted for a new housing development, are gone. Bay Ridge residents didn't engage attorneys or wait out revision of an outdated land development law. Instead, leaders representing the 400 homeowners negotiated a contract last month to purchase the 115 acres of woodland, beaches and bluffs to preserve them.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2001
When plastic surveyors' ribbons first appeared tied to tulip poplar and oak trees in Bay Ridge, an enclave of old summer cottages and modern mini-mansions southeast of Annapolis, residents got nervous. Then they got organized. About a year later, a few of those ribbons remain. But the surveyors, and all they represent in communities such as this one once targeted for a new housing development, are gone. Bay Ridge residents didn't engage attorneys or wait out revision of an outdated land development law. Instead, leaders representing the 400 homeowners negotiated a contract last month to purchase the 115 acres of woodland, beaches and bluffs to preserve them.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 2001
Few and far between are the city neighborhoods capable of convincing visitors that they have stumbled upon a rural retreat. Yet, in Hunting Ridge, winding roads amid hilly terrain, giant oak trees more than 200 years old and ivy-covered stone cottages present a picture of another place in time. On the western edge of Baltimore, bordered by Leakin Park on the north, Edmondson Avenue on the south and nestled between Swann Avenue and Cooks Lane, Hunting Ridge has been the recipient of numerous, descriptive monikers over the years.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1996
The floodlights surrounding a Mount Airy baseball field will remain despite a legal challenge from a group of homeowners who claimed they destroyed the serenity of their neighborhood.Frederick County Circuit Judge John H. Tisdale said he believed the lights had disrupted the lives of Twin Ridge residents and imposed restrictions on when they can be used. However, he concluded that the benefits of the ball field outweigh the concerns of the 16 homeowners.The judge ruled in a dispute that has divided some longtime Mount Airy residents and newcomers to the town.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | November 17, 1992
In Friday's Howard section, an article about the proposed Kendall Ridge pool should have said that planning for the pool is expected to cost $75,000.The Sun regrets the errors.The Howard Research and Development Corp. has submitted plans for a 150-unit town house project in Kendall Ridge, the first phase of development that eventually could add more than 1,000 housing units to the Village of Long Reach.Kendall Ridge is the fourth and newest neighborhood in Long Reach, said Al Scavo, vice president of The Rouse Co. HRD is a subsidiary of The Rouse Co.The county Zoning Board paved the way for residential development in Kendall Ridge by changing the zoning in March for 149 acres of office and retail property to allow residential development.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1999
Seventeen families from the Calvert Ridge subdivision in Elkridge, where several homes were evacuated last year because of a methane gas buildup, filed a federal lawsuit yesterday against the neighborhood's builders and developers.Ryan Homes and the Brantly Development Group are the main defendants named in the suit, which seeks $75 million in damages for lost wages, medical care, pain and suffering, and loss of the reasonable use of property.Robert Coursey, a spokesman for Ryan Homes, did not return calls to his office and car phone yesterday.
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