Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRidge Landfill
IN THE NEWS

Ridge Landfill

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1994
Planned for 15 years, the county's first landfill park is just about finished -- with one nagging exception.The Alpha Ridge Community Park, on about 72 acres on the northern edge of the 590-acre Alpha Ridge Landfill in Marriottsville, has brightly colored, molded-plastic playground equipment, baseball backstops, playing fields, picnic pavilions and tennis and basketball courts. As soon as the grass is well-rooted and the fields are playable, the park will open -- probably next spring.But, said John Byrd, chief of the county Bureau of Parks, the potential for ground-water contamination from the landfill will mean portable chemical toilets in wooden kiosks will be provided instead of flush toilets and sinks with running water.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2002
Howard County school board members have rejected the possibility of building a high school near the county's Alpha Ridge Landfill, making it all the more probable the school will be in the small Mount View neighborhood that has been fighting to keep it out. Board members voted last week against the landfill site, even though school system officials had not reported any environmental or topographical problems with it. Board Chairwoman Jane B. Schuchardt said...
Advertisement
NEWS
September 23, 1999
Howard County residents left with broken tree branches and other storm-related debris can take them to the county's Alpha Ridge Landfill in the 2300 block of Marriottsville Road from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.County highway yards in Elkridge, Clarksville and West Friendship will be open for disposal of residential wood debris from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.The yards are at 7751 Mayfield Ave.; 4301 Route 32, 3.5 miles north of Route 108; and at 14212 Frederick Road.Eastern county residents may recycle fallen debris on their regular collection day.Where storm damage is heavy, residents may call 410-313-4400 to request a county worker to inspect their neighborhood and decide whether a cleanup container is needed.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2002
The Robey administration wants to expand an outdoor police firing range at Alpha Ridge Landfill into a 30-acre training facility for Howard County firefighters and police. The location of the proposed $7.5 million facility, near Marriottsville, was revealed yesterday to Howard legislators and about 500 residents of the area, who were mailed notification letters. A public meeting to discuss the idea is scheduled at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 28 at Mount View Middle School. County Executive James N. Robey is asking county legislators to help obtain $500,000 in matching state funds to plan and begin work on the facility, which officials say is badly needed.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1997
Howard County officials -- stung by recent suggestions that the Alpha Ridge Landfill is a threat to its neighbors -- went on the public-relations offensive last night with new tests and a new expert to testify to the landfill's safety.Laura Green, a toxicologist from Cambridge, Mass., flown down by the county, told about 40 Marriottsville residents that she thought gases at the landfill exist in concentrations too low to affect their health."When you think about cancer in your neighborhood and you think about the landfill, stop and think about all these other causes," Green said, listing estrogen, sunlight, alcohol, asbestos, cigarettes and radiation.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | December 28, 1993
Hoping to cut the amount of hazardous waste that ends up in the county landfill, the Public Works Department will build a drop-off site for residents' old paint, cleaning solvents and spent bug spray cans.The estimated $110,000 facility at the Alpha Ridge Landfill in Marriottsville will accept a variety of household hazardous waste, probably on a monthly basis. It could be operating by May, officials say."The citizens' solid waste committee urged that this move forward right away, so we're trying to move forward and get it done," said James M. Irvin, public works director.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | December 28, 1993
Hoping to cut the amount of hazardous waste that ends up in the Howard County landfill, the Public Works Department will build a drop-off site for residents' old paint, cleaning solvents and spent bug spray cans.The estimated $110,000 facility at the Alpha Ridge Landfill in Marriottsville will accept a variety of household hazardous waste, probably on a monthly basis. It could be operating by May, officials say."The citizens' solid waste committee urged that this move forward right away, so we're trying to move forward and get it done," said James M. Irvin, public works director.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1994
Fearing traffic, noise and foul odors, Elkridge residents are fighting plans to build a waste-transfer station in their community that would process 2,000 tons of garbage a day."I'm worried about the garbage, smell and the rodents," said Montgomery Woods resident Ronald Tilkins, a member of the board of directors of the Elkridge Community Association. "I don't call it a waste-transfer station. I call it a dump."Browning-Ferris Industries, which collects and processes most of the county's trash and recyclables, wants to build a waste-transfer station next to its recycling plant off U.S. 1 on Cemetery Lane.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | February 16, 1992
County Executive Charles I. Ecker wants the county Public Works Department to evaluate property next to the Alpha Ridge landfill before looking elsewhere for a new dump site -- but not without allowing the public to debate the idea first.The beginning of that debate is expected Tuesday night when the Planning Board has a public hearing onthe fiscal 1993 capital budget.A year ago, Ecker's first capital budget included $285,000 for a study to evaluate the possibility of expanding Alpha Ridge or findinga site elsewhere.
NEWS
October 23, 1994
Ecker as Executive: Folksy or Feckless?Nearly everyone in Howard County, it seems, agrees that Chuck Ecker is a nice old man. Even his re-election campaign plays up his grandfatherly image, how he can cozy up to cows and their 4-H owners, and elicit testimonials to his gregarious and friendly nature from other common folk. His campaign ads suggest a friendliness that is boundless.Not everyone is taken in by these vacuous images. The reality of Ecker's four years as county executive has been marked by a systematic neglect of the plain folk he claims to be cozy with and an abdication of any real leadership.
NEWS
September 23, 1999
Howard County residents left with broken tree branches and other storm-related debris can take them to the county's Alpha Ridge Landfill in the 2300 block of Marriottsville Road from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.County highway yards in Elkridge, Clarksville and West Friendship will be open for disposal of residential wood debris from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.The yards are at 7751 Mayfield Ave.; 4301 Route 32, 3.5 miles north of Route 108; and at 14212 Frederick Road.Eastern county residents may recycle fallen debris on their regular collection day.Where storm damage is heavy, residents may call 410-313-4400 to request a county worker to inspect their neighborhood and decide whether a cleanup container is needed.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1997
Despite allegations that the Alpha Ridge Landfill may be hurting the health of some of its neighbors, Howard County officials want to use 12 acres on the southwest side of the Marriottsville site for soccer fields.County recreation officials presented the plan last week to residents living near the landfill, which soon will stop receiving most trash.Many residents were pleased with the idea, but some expressed concerns over the increased traffic in the residential areas surrounding the landfill.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1997
Howard County officials -- stung by recent suggestions that the Alpha Ridge Landfill is a threat to its neighbors -- went on the public-relations offensive last night with new tests and a new expert to testify to the landfill's safety.Laura Green, a toxicologist from Cambridge, Mass., flown down by the county, told about 40 Marriottsville residents that she thought gases at the landfill exist in concentrations too low to affect their health."When you think about cancer in your neighborhood and you think about the landfill, stop and think about all these other causes," Green said, listing estrogen, sunlight, alcohol, asbestos, cigarettes and radiation.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1997
As Howard County moves to divert its residential trash from Alpha Ridge in Marriottsville to an out-of-state landfill, a waste-management company told the County Council last night that a new transfer facility is needed to dispose of commercial trash and promote more recycling.Browning-Ferris Inc. asked the council members, sitting as the Zoning Board, to approve a 17-acre solid-waste transfer station off U.S. 1 near Cemetery Lane in Elkridge. A transfer station consolidates and prepares trash for transport to a landfill.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1996
Howard County officials plan to spend about $15 million to cap the Alpha Ridge landfill, collect the gases it emits and contain the contaminated ground water below it.They detailed the plan at a public meeting at Mount View Middle School in Marriottsville on Tuesday night, during which about 20 area residents quizzed them and their landfill consultants, Reston, Va.-based SCS Engineers.Residents have fought for years to close the landfill and control the toxic chemicals that seep from below it. There is no evidence that contamination has reached residential wells, but neighbors say it is only a matter of time.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | July 12, 1995
The Howard County Board of Appeals approved last night a 250-foot communications tower near the Alpha Ridge Landfill, despite an 11th-hour plea by a group of Marriottsville residents to delay the decision.The zoning exception sought for the tower by Nextel Communications Inc. was the latest in a flood of such requests from cellular telephone and pager companies, rushing to meet a booming demand for wireless communication in the county.Using negotiation and new regulations, county officials have tried to limit the proliferation of towers and thick metal poles for cellular antennas.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | August 16, 1992
The nation's second-largest trash hauler has made an offer that may be hard to refuse: Close the county landfill and let a private company worry about where to put the trash."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | April 26, 1992
Contaminants were found in two test wells along the northern border of Alpha Ridge landfill, Public Works Department officials told the County Council last week."
NEWS
October 23, 1994
Ecker as Executive: Folksy or Feckless?Nearly everyone in Howard County, it seems, agrees that Chuck Ecker is a nice old man. Even his re-election campaign plays up his grandfatherly image, how he can cozy up to cows and their 4-H owners, and elicit testimonials to his gregarious and friendly nature from other common folk. His campaign ads suggest a friendliness that is boundless.Not everyone is taken in by these vacuous images. The reality of Ecker's four years as county executive has been marked by a systematic neglect of the plain folk he claims to be cozy with and an abdication of any real leadership.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1994
Planned for 15 years, the county's first landfill park is just about finished -- with one nagging exception.The Alpha Ridge Community Park, on about 72 acres on the northern edge of the 590-acre Alpha Ridge Landfill in Marriottsville, has brightly colored, molded-plastic playground equipment, baseball backstops, playing fields, picnic pavilions and tennis and basketball courts. As soon as the grass is well-rooted and the fields are playable, the park will open -- probably next spring.But, said John Byrd, chief of the county Bureau of Parks, the potential for ground-water contamination from the landfill will mean portable chemical toilets in wooden kiosks will be provided instead of flush toilets and sinks with running water.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.