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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Hundreds of fewer commuters have been taking MARC trains and transit buses from Maryland into Washington since the federal government shutdown Tuesday, according to the Maryland Transit Administration. On Wednesday morning, ridership numbers reflected a 10 to 25 percent decline on MARC trains and a 50 to 60 percent dip on buses, compared to earlier in the week, the MTA found. Ridership on the Brunswick line went from 3,489 riders on Tuesday morning to 3,172 riders on Wednesday morning, officials said - a 10 percent decline.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
A total of 13,338 people rode MARC trains along the Penn Line this weekend, setting a record for the new service as many made their way to Washington for cherry blossom celebrations. That's more than triple the number — 4,085 — who rode the service in its first weekend of operations, in December. Weekend service began with $46 million in funding put toward the state transportation department's six-year budget and raised through an increase in the state's new gas tax, after years of cost being cited as an obstacle to the expansion.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The Maryland Transit Administration will increase capacity on weekend MARC trains between Baltimore and Washington beginning Saturday, citing growing ridership on the months-old service. The Penn Line service saw its most weekend riders to date this past weekend, on March 8 and 9, when 6,530 passengers traveled between Baltimore and its neighbor to the south, said Paulette Austrich, a MTA spokeswoman. The MTA first began weekend MARC service between Baltimore's Penn Station and Washington's Union Station on the first Saturday of December, offering nine three-car trains on Saturdays and six three-car trains on Sundays.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The Maryland Transit Administration will increase capacity on weekend MARC trains between Baltimore and Washington beginning Saturday, citing growing ridership on the months-old service. The Penn Line service saw its most weekend riders to date this past weekend, on March 8 and 9, when 6,530 passengers traveled between Baltimore and its neighbor to the south, said Paulette Austrich, a MTA spokeswoman. The MTA first began weekend MARC service between Baltimore's Penn Station and Washington's Union Station on the first Saturday of December, offering nine three-car trains on Saturdays and six three-car trains on Sundays.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
A total of 13,338 people rode MARC trains along the Penn Line this weekend, setting a record for the new service as many made their way to Washington for cherry blossom celebrations. That's more than triple the number — 4,085 — who rode the service in its first weekend of operations, in December. Weekend service began with $46 million in funding put toward the state transportation department's six-year budget and raised through an increase in the state's new gas tax, after years of cost being cited as an obstacle to the expansion.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | December 22, 1993
Light rail is finally racking up some heavy numbers.The 19-month-old transit system is attracting 18,617 riders each weekday, more than three times the estimated 5,000 riders who boarded trains at the system's start-up in May 1992.Like a proud parent with a child's glowing report card, Gov. William Donald Schaefer unveiled the figure yesterday in brief ceremonies at the Central Light Rail Line's maintenance facility on North Avenue."Our trains run 98 percent on time," said Mr. Schaefer, "and close to 19,000 trips are made on light rail each day. That means light rail is a success story, and we've done what we proposed."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | June 19, 1994
Carroll Transit System, the county's nonprofit transportation service, is driving more residents where they need to go. Ridership hit an all-time high last month, Executive Director James O. Mathis said.In May, Carroll Transit provided 7,150 rides, he said. The service usually provides 4,000 to 5,000 rides per month. The previous high was in October 1993, when the service provided 6,832 rides, he said.Senior citizens continue to be the primary passengers. In May, Carroll Transit provided rides for 3,146 seniors, Mr. Mathis said.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1997
The Howard Area Transit Service (HATS) West bus service -- '' operating since March from Lisbon to The Mall in Columbia -- may be cut if ridership on the five-days-a-week service does not improve.That warning emerged from Tuesday night's Howard County Public Transportation Board meeting. Three of the five members present suggested discontinuing the bus route, which is funded by the state's Mass Transit Administration (MTA).The bus service, which has 18 stops, has attracted only 230 riders -- paying $1 each -- since it began operating March 24, according to a report compiled by Corridor Transportation Corp.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | April 25, 1993
Baltimore's light rail system is running near empty.One year after opening, the Central Light Rail Line is attracting fewer than one-quarter of the customers it's supposed to carry eventually. The promise of an economic stimulus to the depressed Howard Street business district has gone unfulfilled.As a result, the high-technology electric trolley line built mostly at the expense of state taxpayers continues to be heavily subsidized by tax dollars, even by the generous standards of mass transit.
NEWS
April 7, 2000
FOR GOOD reason, mass transit is transportation of last resort in the Baltimore area. But rising gas prices are making travelers take a second look at buses and rail. The Mass Transit Association has a chance here to snare some permanent users -- but only if it cleans up its act and delivers better service than regular riders endure. Last year, the Citizens Planning and Housing Association found serious flaws with MTA service -- dirty buses, drivers who don't announce stops, broken windows and seats, too little information about routes and schedules.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
About 5 p.m. on a recent afternoon, Kevin Leslie and Chris Zorn, both 28, hopped off a small boat onto a short pier at the Canton waterfront, headed for happy-hour drinks at nearby Claddagh Pub. The friends had met after work - Leslie at Wells Fargo and Zorn at Big City Farms - and for their evening in popular O'Donnell Square, the Harbor Connector water taxi was the easy choice for getting across town, they said. "There are no stoplights on the water, and you always know exactly when [the boat]
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2013
Amtrak saw record ridership in fiscal year 2013, including tens of thousands of additional riders out of Baltimore's Penn Station, the company said Monday. Total national ridership reached 31.6 million, about 400,000 more than in 2012, the company said. The system has seen ridership growth in 10 out of the last 11 years, the exception being 2009. The system logged slight ridership bumps along its northeast corridor and in Maryland, with more than 2 million riders at the state's five largest stations, the company said.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Hundreds of fewer commuters have been taking MARC trains and transit buses from Maryland into Washington since the federal government shutdown Tuesday, according to the Maryland Transit Administration. On Wednesday morning, ridership numbers reflected a 10 to 25 percent decline on MARC trains and a 50 to 60 percent dip on buses, compared to earlier in the week, the MTA found. Ridership on the Brunswick line went from 3,489 riders on Tuesday morning to 3,172 riders on Wednesday morning, officials said - a 10 percent decline.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
The first of 70 new energy-efficient locomotives destined for Amtrak's East Coast service rolled off Monday morning from a Sacramento, Calif., assembly line. The locomotives, called Amtrak Cities Sprinters and built by Siemens Rail Systems, will replace Amtrak equipment that has been in service for more than two decades and has logged an average of 3.5 million miles. The new engines, costing $466 million, will be used on the Northeast Corridor between Washington and Boston and on the Philadelphia-to-Harrisburg Keystone Corridor.
NEWS
October 21, 2012
The unblinking eye of the camera is increasingly all around us. On the street corner, inside the convenience store, in office building lobbies - not to mention in the hands of everyone with a cellphone. So it's not surprising that the Maryland Transit Administration's plan to activate microphones on buses is raising concerns about privacy. But while there is a good conversation to be had about the slippery slope of lost privacy in Baltimore and elsewhere, this doesn't appear to be the place to draw the line.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Amid growing ridership of the free Circulator and calls for more routes, Annapolis officials plan to expand the trolley service beyond the city's downtown. Weekend and special event service could be added as early as August to link Eastport and West Annapolis to the downtown area. No start dates have been set, but officials said plans are in the works. It would be a boost for businesses in the two sections and residents near the downtown area and the tourist-filled Historic District, said Mayor Joshua Cohen.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
A long-sought commuter bus line from Mount Airy to the Washington metro area has shut down, barely one month after it started, because of abysmal ridership, an official of the Howard County motor coach company said. Eyre Bus Service Inc. of Glenelg began the twice-daily round-trip service last month, offering a $6 one-way trip by motor coach from the park-and-ride lot at Interstate 70 and Route 27. But it made its last run from Mount Airy on Friday, said Matthew T. Eyre, marketing and research coordinator.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Amid growing ridership of the free Circulator and calls for more routes, Annapolis officials plan to expand the trolley service beyond the city's downtown. Weekend and special event service could be added as early as August to link Eastport and West Annapolis to the downtown area. No start dates have been set, but officials said plans are in the works. It would be a boost for businesses in the two sections and residents near the downtown area and the tourist-filled Historic District, said Mayor Joshua Cohen.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2011
Theresa Kelly figures she's saving $550 in parking by taking the Charm City Circulator from her home in Harbor East to the University of Maryland nursing school. Courtney Kellum uses the "wonderful" service every day, hopping on the free bus in Mount Vernon to get to her job at the Kona Grill on Pratt Street. Navy veteran Tom Ryan rides it between the homeless shelter where he stays and the Veterans Administration on Greene Street. The three Baltimore residents are among the thousands who have come to depend on the Circulator, which made its debut on the streets of Baltimore a year ago Tuesday.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley's symbolic commute to atone for this week's sweltering "hell train" that left Penn Line passengers stranded turned into a blistering political exchange Thursday after his political rival blasted top state appointees for what he said was inattention to rail issues. After the campaign of former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. issued a statement criticizing top O'Malley appointees for failing to attend meetings of a MARC riders' advisory group, O'Malley responded immediately with sharp comments of his own, excoriating Ehrlich's transportation personnel choices when he was governor.
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