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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2003
Barbara Pruitt of Finksburg requested a Baltimore cheesecake "like the one Muhly's Bakery used to make." She said, "It was a thin cheesecake and had a pastry crust. I think it had ricotta as well as cream cheese and currants." Her answer came from Jennifer A. Macek of Towson, who wrote: "Attached is a recipe for ricotta cheesecake, which may be what Barbara Pruitt is looking for. I am not familiar with the cheesecake that Ms. Pruitt apparently used to purchase from Muhly's Bakery. Hopefully, this is similar."
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ENTERTAINMENT
Julie Rothman and For The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2014
Betty Jackson of La Porte, Ind., was trying to locate a recipe for a cheesecake that she used to purchase at a Chicago bakery but that they no longer carry. When she inquired, she was told the cake was made with cheese, but not cream cheese, and the bakery would not give her any specifics. She said the cake was somewhat taller then a normal cheesecake, perhaps by about 3 inches, and had a lighter texture. Carol Cipriani of South Bend, Ind., sent in her recipe for an Italian-style cheesecake made with ricotta cheese that she thought might be what Jackson was looking for. It has a graham cracker crust like many American-style cheesecakes, but Cipriani's recipe calls for fresh ricotta instead of cream cheese.
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NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | June 11, 2008
Ciro Marino's torta di ricotta is an old-fashioned Italian chef's take on an old-fashioned Italian dessert. Marino, who doesn't even have a measuring spoon at Marino's, the Los Angeles restaurant he has helmed for 25 years, bakes his cake in the bottom of the oven, door propped open with an old saucepan (a method we updated), the cake insulated by a layer of crushed graham crackers tucked around the pan instead of a hot water bath. Marino's cheesecake is a paean to ricotta. It's made with 5 pounds of the glorious stuff.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
The Little Italy restaurant formerly known Germano's Trattoria is now Germano's Piattini. Germano's was doing just fine as a trattoria, the owners said, but they wanted to keep one step ahead of changing tastes. So they revamped just about everything. The main dining areas in the restaurant were renovated last fall, and the menu was given a nearly complete overhaul. But really, the restaurant's whole approach to dining has changed. Dining at Germano's Trattoria was always a commitment to a full dinner, your basic Little Italy package of appetizer, entree and bottle of wine.
FEATURES
By NICK MALGIERI and NICK MALGIERI,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 8, 2006
The sweetness of almond paste perfumes the air in Sicily. This is understandable because almond paste is an essential ingredient in so many of the cakes, cookies and confections that make Sicilian baking the most elaborate and interesting in all of Italy. And not just at Easter. The nut pastes, refined sugar and candied fruit, for which the island is so famous, were bequeathed by the Saracen Arabs who ruled the island for more than two centuries, beginning in the early 800s. And when the preparation of elaborate sweets moved out of the palaces, it crept into, of all places, the convents of cloistered nuns, who adopted the baking and selling of all sorts of sweets as means to support their communities.
FEATURES
February 2, 1994
Q: What is a bain-marie?A: This is a French term for water bath which is used to cook foods gently by surrounding the cooking vessel with simmering water, while baking in the oven or cooking on the stove. Custards often call for cooking in a bain-marie.Q: I have heard there is a male and female eggplant which determines the amount of seeds in the vegetable. How can I tell the difference?A: Many authorities differ on the answer, but the most recent information I've gathered is that eggplants do not have a gender.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | September 2, 2009
Buffalo taste, Polly-O budget. I don't know about you, but this recession has done nothing to curb my appetite for fancy cheese, just my ability to buy it. So I set out to make the stuff at home. That explains why I soon found myself pouring curdled milk into an old pillowcase, on purpose. Dialing up the cheese-making equivalent of the Butterball Turkey hot line. And, eventually, eating some very good and not-so-good cheese. "You make a lot of bad cheese before you make good cheese," Kate Dallam, owner of Broom's Bloom Dairy in Bel Air, said when I'd consulted her at the outset.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 15, 2003
Of all the job-related questions I get, probably the toughest is "Where should we go in Little Italy?" Like Harborplace, the neighborhood has been taken over by tourists. Some of the restaurants have mediocre food or are overpriced. The ones that have the best food are special-occasion restaurants (read "pricey"). What I haven't found is the place everyone is looking for: the small, cozy and inexpensive family-run restaurant with good, traditional Italian dishes. Does it still exist? I don't know.
NEWS
By Donna Crivello and Donna Crivello,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2002
When I was in my early teens and just becoming more aware of the different foods outside my home, I wondered why my mother never folded over her omelets. I would watch her slide the almost-cooked, eggy, plate-sized disk onto a bigger plate, then slip it back into the pan to cook it on the other side. At other times, she would finish cooking it with a lid or under the broiler. This was a frittata, an Italian omelet that has cheese and vegetables mixed in with the eggs and is "baked" in the pan. It is slightly firmer than the classic French omelet because it is cooked slowly over a lower heat and its center finishes last.
FEATURES
By Mary Carroll and Mary Carroll,Orlando SentinelCarroll Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 7, 1994
Each September, school begins again and "What's for lunch?" becomes a daily question. Parents rack their brains trying to think of healthy, quick sandwich fillers to fill their kids, hoping maybe this year the homemade sandwiches will contain such enticing interiors that they won't be traded for Twinkies or Mars bars.Each September, coming up empty on new ideas, parents pack the same cheese or peanut butter sandwiches that are sure to be eaten.I face the same challenge in preparing work lunches for my brown-bagging family.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun and By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 6, 2013
Riccardo Bosio knows that great food - and great eating habits - start with fresh, whole ingredients. Bosio, the owner of the upscale Italian restaurant Sotto Sopra in Mount Vernon, can often be found in his home kitchen with his wife, Monika, and their daughters Amelia, 3, and Victoria, who will be 2 months old in June. "We cook at home and at the restaurant," says Bosio. "Amelia is always with us cooking. We try to teach her how things are made by hand. " Young Amelia loves healthy ingredients, like fresh pasta, Parmesan cheese and even spinach.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | September 2, 2009
Buffalo taste, Polly-O budget. I don't know about you, but this recession has done nothing to curb my appetite for fancy cheese, just my ability to buy it. So I set out to make the stuff at home. That explains why I soon found myself pouring curdled milk into an old pillowcase, on purpose. Dialing up the cheese-making equivalent of the Butterball Turkey hot line. And, eventually, eating some very good and not-so-good cheese. "You make a lot of bad cheese before you make good cheese," Kate Dallam, owner of Broom's Bloom Dairy in Bel Air, said when I'd consulted her at the outset.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2009
Rosalind Mann of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for a ricotta cake. She was not very specific about what exactly she wanted and I received many variations on what people consider to be a ricotta cake. Several readers sent in similar recipes that used a boxed cake mix for the foundation of the cake. I decided to give the recipe from Linda Ott of Amsterdam, N.Y., a try. She said the cake is a favorite of her family and that she is always asked for the recipe when she takes the cake anywhere.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2008
Rosalind Mann of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for a ricotta cake. She did not give any detail as to what type of cake she was looking for, and I received several variations of what our readers knew as ricotta cakes. I was most intrigued with a recipe sent in by Frances Bedini of Florida, Mass. Her recipe, called Italian Ricotta Cake, came from her mother-in-law, who Bedini says made it for the family every Christmas. It is much like a cheesecake, with a buttery bottom crust topped with a rich creamy filling.
NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | June 11, 2008
Ciro Marino's torta di ricotta is an old-fashioned Italian chef's take on an old-fashioned Italian dessert. Marino, who doesn't even have a measuring spoon at Marino's, the Los Angeles restaurant he has helmed for 25 years, bakes his cake in the bottom of the oven, door propped open with an old saucepan (a method we updated), the cake insulated by a layer of crushed graham crackers tucked around the pan instead of a hot water bath. Marino's cheesecake is a paean to ricotta. It's made with 5 pounds of the glorious stuff.
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 14, 2007
Thick, creamy pasta sauces don't have to be laden with calories, and they don't have to take forever to make. Sometimes it is just a matter of stirring in the right ingredient. In this case, ricotta cheese. To borrow a tip from chef and cookbook author Mario Batali, hot pasta water is blended with the ricotta to "melt" it into a creamier texture. For this recipe, we broiled cherry tomatoes to get optimal flavor, and used their juice to help create the sauce when we mixed in the cheese.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
The Little Italy restaurant formerly known Germano's Trattoria is now Germano's Piattini. Germano's was doing just fine as a trattoria, the owners said, but they wanted to keep one step ahead of changing tastes. So they revamped just about everything. The main dining areas in the restaurant were renovated last fall, and the menu was given a nearly complete overhaul. But really, the restaurant's whole approach to dining has changed. Dining at Germano's Trattoria was always a commitment to a full dinner, your basic Little Italy package of appetizer, entree and bottle of wine.
FEATURES
By Charles Britton and Charles Britton,Copley News Service | January 26, 1992
For those gloomy days, when everything seems to be turning into dross, I have this note of encouragement to offer: We are living in the great age of cheesecake.It's a minor consolation, to be sure, but it's the best I can come up with at the moment.The decade of the '80s, notable for so many epochal events, also managed to bring cheesecake to new heights. The fashion for culinary Americana that set in during the mid-'80s brought cheesecake, always a popular standard, to high-profile dining.
FEATURES
By NICK MALGIERI and NICK MALGIERI,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 8, 2006
The sweetness of almond paste perfumes the air in Sicily. This is understandable because almond paste is an essential ingredient in so many of the cakes, cookies and confections that make Sicilian baking the most elaborate and interesting in all of Italy. And not just at Easter. The nut pastes, refined sugar and candied fruit, for which the island is so famous, were bequeathed by the Saracen Arabs who ruled the island for more than two centuries, beginning in the early 800s. And when the preparation of elaborate sweets moved out of the palaces, it crept into, of all places, the convents of cloistered nuns, who adopted the baking and selling of all sorts of sweets as means to support their communities.
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