Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRick James
IN THE NEWS

Rick James

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD OLLISON | August 12, 2004
It's fitting that he would leave us in summer, that Rick James would die when the weather reflects the spirit of his classic music: bright and blisteringly hot. I have always associated Rick's music with the summers of my country childhood -- when my cousins and I used to do the snake, the gigolo and all the latest dances to "Give It to Me Baby," "Super Freak" and "Dance Wit' Me." My great-grandmother, Ma Rene, was hip. She kept a jukebox in the backroom of her house. And my cousins and I would fill it with quarters, punching the numbers for the Rick James records.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Lauren McEwen and For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
We pick things up at Olivia's, where a disappointed Jake is packing up to go home. Olivia's safer if he's not there. She says Fitz will protect her, but Jake scoffs. Her father is Command and Fitz can't defend her, because he doesn't even know who her enemy is. Olivia tries, in a convincing tone, to say that her father would never kill her, but Jake has seen the full extent of Eli/Rowan's wrath and describes the torture he endured in that hole: beatings, starvation, isolation, then being nursed to health for a second round.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Anne Burke and Anne Burke,Los Angeles Daily News | August 18, 1993
With his cornrowed and beaded hair, elaborate costumes and bass-heavy music, Rick James shot to fame with a distinctive synthesis of funk, jazz and rock.In 1981, James hit it big with the single "Super Freak," a taut, sexually charged dance number that later would earn him a Grammy Award and helped launch him as the self-proclaimed "king of funk."But his professional career sputtered in the latter half of the 1980s. While his music-industry peers were shaking their images as hard partyers, James -- approaching middle age and struggling with a longtime drug habit -- still was living in the rock 'n' roll fast lane.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | February 19, 2007
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Back in the early 1990s, the Lemonheads were among the most visible bands on the scene, with a couple of quirky, catchy albums (It's A Shame About Ray and Come On Feel The Lemonheads), an eclectic mixture of cool names making cameos (Juliana Hatfield, Belinda Carlisle, Rick James) and a solid following. They also had a lead singer and musical mastermind named Evan Dando, whose pretty hair and casually scruffy sexiness delighted some fans and royally annoyed many others, including some critics.
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Amelia Neufeld and Geoff Boucher and Amelia Neufeld,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 7, 2004
Funk pioneer Rick James, famous for the raunchy 1981 hit "Super Freak (Part 1)," but also for drug and sex crimes that outsized the debauchery of his music, was found dead yesterday morning at his home near Universal City in Los Angeles. He was 56. Police arrived at the singer's home at about 9:50 a.m. after a live-in caretaker reported finding the body of the singer. The preliminary report was that James died of natural causes, according to Los Angeles police and the star's attending physician, who signed the death certificate.
NEWS
October 11, 1993
More legal woes for Rick JamesIt just keeps getting worse for embattled funk star Rick James. His pre-prison wedding plans fell flat and two more women have come forward to accuse him of kinky sexual violence.Prosecutors say this time a woman has a videotape showing the singer of the 1981 hit "Super Freak" beating her bloody with a belt during group sex.The Grammy-winner will be sentenced Nov. 5 for assaulting a woman who was tortured for hours with a hot cocaine pipe while being held captive in 1992.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | February 19, 2007
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Back in the early 1990s, the Lemonheads were among the most visible bands on the scene, with a couple of quirky, catchy albums (It's A Shame About Ray and Come On Feel The Lemonheads), an eclectic mixture of cool names making cameos (Juliana Hatfield, Belinda Carlisle, Rick James) and a solid following. They also had a lead singer and musical mastermind named Evan Dando, whose pretty hair and casually scruffy sexiness delighted some fans and royally annoyed many others, including some critics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 4, 2003
It's been a long time, and so much has changed since those two shared a stage. Back in the late '70s and early '80s, Rick James and Teena Marie were two of the hottest acts in black pop. James was the self-proclaimed "supafreak," rocking sequin-studded spandex suits and slinging his regal braids as he delivered tough, uncut funk. You know the hits: "You and I," "Mary Jane," "Give It To Me Baby" and, well, "Super Freak." His protege and one-time lover, Marie, was (and still is) an anomaly of sorts: a white female singer whose soul-rich sound and gospel-jazz approach never really crossed over.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 18, 1992
By almost any reckoning, They Might Be Giants -- the songwriting and recording team of John Flansburgh and John Linnell -- are pure pop geniuses. Their best work is ingeniously structured and relentlessly tuneful, the sort of hook-a-minute masterpieces, which, once heard, ricochet around your memory for hours.They really crank 'em out, too. Each of the Giants' five albums packs a hefty 18 or 19 songs, yet there always seems to be enough left over to stock their Dial-A-Song number, a self-run service that offers a new tune daily for the price of a long-distance call (it's [718]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Thom Duffy and Thom Duffy,Musician Magazine | July 8, 1994
London -- After a run of independent-label releases in the late '80s, and a barely noticed big-label debut in 1990, the Boston-based Lemonheads finally bounced beyond their college cult with a grunge-pop remake of "Mrs. Robinson" and the album "It's a Shame about Ray."As lead Lemonhead Evan Dando became alternative music's cover boy of the year, the threesome won over radio, MTV and concert crowds from L.A. to London to Sydney. So with its current album, "Come on Feel the Lemonheads," the band certainly has reached a milestone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD OLLISON | August 12, 2004
It's fitting that he would leave us in summer, that Rick James would die when the weather reflects the spirit of his classic music: bright and blisteringly hot. I have always associated Rick's music with the summers of my country childhood -- when my cousins and I used to do the snake, the gigolo and all the latest dances to "Give It to Me Baby," "Super Freak" and "Dance Wit' Me." My great-grandmother, Ma Rene, was hip. She kept a jukebox in the backroom of her house. And my cousins and I would fill it with quarters, punching the numbers for the Rick James records.
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Amelia Neufeld and Geoff Boucher and Amelia Neufeld,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 7, 2004
Funk pioneer Rick James, famous for the raunchy 1981 hit "Super Freak (Part 1)," but also for drug and sex crimes that outsized the debauchery of his music, was found dead yesterday morning at his home near Universal City in Los Angeles. He was 56. Police arrived at the singer's home at about 9:50 a.m. after a live-in caretaker reported finding the body of the singer. The preliminary report was that James died of natural causes, according to Los Angeles police and the star's attending physician, who signed the death certificate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 4, 2003
It's been a long time, and so much has changed since those two shared a stage. Back in the late '70s and early '80s, Rick James and Teena Marie were two of the hottest acts in black pop. James was the self-proclaimed "supafreak," rocking sequin-studded spandex suits and slinging his regal braids as he delivered tough, uncut funk. You know the hits: "You and I," "Mary Jane," "Give It To Me Baby" and, well, "Super Freak." His protege and one-time lover, Marie, was (and still is) an anomaly of sorts: a white female singer whose soul-rich sound and gospel-jazz approach never really crossed over.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Thom Duffy and Thom Duffy,Musician Magazine | July 8, 1994
London -- After a run of independent-label releases in the late '80s, and a barely noticed big-label debut in 1990, the Boston-based Lemonheads finally bounced beyond their college cult with a grunge-pop remake of "Mrs. Robinson" and the album "It's a Shame about Ray."As lead Lemonhead Evan Dando became alternative music's cover boy of the year, the threesome won over radio, MTV and concert crowds from L.A. to London to Sydney. So with its current album, "Come on Feel the Lemonheads," the band certainly has reached a milestone.
NEWS
October 11, 1993
More legal woes for Rick JamesIt just keeps getting worse for embattled funk star Rick James. His pre-prison wedding plans fell flat and two more women have come forward to accuse him of kinky sexual violence.Prosecutors say this time a woman has a videotape showing the singer of the 1981 hit "Super Freak" beating her bloody with a belt during group sex.The Grammy-winner will be sentenced Nov. 5 for assaulting a woman who was tortured for hours with a hot cocaine pipe while being held captive in 1992.
FEATURES
By Anne Burke and Anne Burke,Los Angeles Daily News | August 18, 1993
With his cornrowed and beaded hair, elaborate costumes and bass-heavy music, Rick James shot to fame with a distinctive synthesis of funk, jazz and rock.In 1981, James hit it big with the single "Super Freak," a taut, sexually charged dance number that later would earn him a Grammy Award and helped launch him as the self-proclaimed "king of funk."But his professional career sputtered in the latter half of the 1980s. While his music-industry peers were shaking their images as hard partyers, James -- approaching middle age and struggling with a longtime drug habit -- still was living in the rock 'n' roll fast lane.
ENTERTAINMENT
Lauren McEwen and For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
We pick things up at Olivia's, where a disappointed Jake is packing up to go home. Olivia's safer if he's not there. She says Fitz will protect her, but Jake scoffs. Her father is Command and Fitz can't defend her, because he doesn't even know who her enemy is. Olivia tries, in a convincing tone, to say that her father would never kill her, but Jake has seen the full extent of Eli/Rowan's wrath and describes the torture he endured in that hole: beatings, starvation, isolation, then being nursed to health for a second round.
NEWS
August 15, 1991
Police were looking this morning for a wounded gunman who engaged in a shootout with a uniformed officer shortly after midnight in West Baltimore.Homicide Detective Rick James said the officer, who was not identified, was investigating a report of a stolen car at Belmont Avenue and Rosedale Street when he heard gunshots. He looked up just as a black Jeep Wrangler, with Maryland license plate 390718M, roared south on Rosedale and screeched to a halt in the intersection. A man jumped out and opened fire on the officer with a 9mm handgun, Detective James said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 18, 1992
By almost any reckoning, They Might Be Giants -- the songwriting and recording team of John Flansburgh and John Linnell -- are pure pop geniuses. Their best work is ingeniously structured and relentlessly tuneful, the sort of hook-a-minute masterpieces, which, once heard, ricochet around your memory for hours.They really crank 'em out, too. Each of the Giants' five albums packs a hefty 18 or 19 songs, yet there always seems to be enough left over to stock their Dial-A-Song number, a self-run service that offers a new tune daily for the price of a long-distance call (it's [718]
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.