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Rick Bass

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NEWS
By Christopher Tilghman and Christopher Tilghman,Los Angeles Times | May 1, 1994
People who admire Rick Bass' resplendent 1989 story collection, "The Watch," as well as his several intervening nonfiction books on what the publishers call "the outdoors," have been looking forward to his new book of fiction with unusual interest. Some may be gunning for him, a writer who makes his reputation all too easily with a single book, but most of us are simply eager.We want to see where Mr. Bass' jumpy, oddly lyrical voice -- a voice entirely his own -- takes him a year or two down the road; we want to see if he's getting closer to the truths of his slightly fractured sense of reality, whatever those truths may be. We want to see if he's still putting it all on the line every time he writes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | July 14, 2002
The Hermit's Story, by Rick Bass. Houghton Mifflin Co. 179 pages. $23. A man and a woman and a pack of newly trained dogs became lost inside a frozen lake without water. Blue emanates from the earth: "blue is a thing that emerges from the soil itself." Society has ceased to exist in these mesmerizing stories which breathe outside of time and history. Nothing tropical invades. In the title story of this marvelous collection, Rick Bass sees through the eyes of birds and deer. Nature puts human beings in their place.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | July 14, 2002
The Hermit's Story, by Rick Bass. Houghton Mifflin Co. 179 pages. $23. A man and a woman and a pack of newly trained dogs became lost inside a frozen lake without water. Blue emanates from the earth: "blue is a thing that emerges from the soil itself." Society has ceased to exist in these mesmerizing stories which breathe outside of time and history. Nothing tropical invades. In the title story of this marvelous collection, Rick Bass sees through the eyes of birds and deer. Nature puts human beings in their place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Maria Blackburn and By Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | June 4, 2000
"Colter: The True Story of the Best Dog I Ever Had," by Rick Bass. Houghton Mifflin. 188 pages. $22. Dog books usually go something like this: Person gets dog, person loves dog, dog dies. Lassie may come home, but Sounder expires. Old Yeller gets shot. Fido buys the farm. It's clear from the title that Colter the dog won't live to see the end of Rick Bass' memoir. But Bass' 16th book isn't just another puppy-snuff tome. Instead, the poet and novelist has created a quietly passionate book about walking through the woods on crisp autumn days, about bird hunting and nature, a lyrical tribute to the relationship between people and dogs that is so graceful and restrained it reads more like poetry than prose.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Maria Blackburn and By Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | June 4, 2000
"Colter: The True Story of the Best Dog I Ever Had," by Rick Bass. Houghton Mifflin. 188 pages. $22. Dog books usually go something like this: Person gets dog, person loves dog, dog dies. Lassie may come home, but Sounder expires. Old Yeller gets shot. Fido buys the farm. It's clear from the title that Colter the dog won't live to see the end of Rick Bass' memoir. But Bass' 16th book isn't just another puppy-snuff tome. Instead, the poet and novelist has created a quietly passionate book about walking through the woods on crisp autumn days, about bird hunting and nature, a lyrical tribute to the relationship between people and dogs that is so graceful and restrained it reads more like poetry than prose.
NEWS
By TIM WARREN PRIZED POSSESSIONS. Avery Corman. Simon & Schuster. 320 pages. $19.95 | March 24, 1991
WINTER: NOTESFROM MONTANA.Rick Bass.Houghton Mifflin/Seymour Lawrence.162 pages. $18.95.This is the sort of winter Rick Bass writes about:"A cold front came down out of Alaska yesterday, dropping the temperature from twenty above to fifteen below in less than an hour -- branches and limbs blowing from the trees, everything tumbling past, and the wind biting, ripping. The temperature kept dropping after dark, crackling cold stars, plunging, bottoming out around thirty-eight, thirty-nine below.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | October 3, 1994
Every so often, a collection of short stories by a young writer gets an unusual amount of attention. Usually the writer had a story published first in the New Yorker or Esquire; by the time the collection comes out, anticipation has set in.A few years ago, it was Ethan Canin and his collection, "The Emperor of the Air." Last year, it was Thom Jones and his powerful "The Pugilist at Rest." This year, the candidate seems to be Kevin Canty, whose first collection, "A Stranger in This World," has already attracted strong notice.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | September 13, 1991
"When the basic communication in a relationship breaks down, it's time to end it," says Mick Jones, lead guitarist for Foreigner. "Just like in a marriage."Although Jones' partnership with singer Lou Gramm had 13 years of mostly honeymoon-like success -- including six platinum albums -- it all ended last March when the sides mutually agreed to part.Jones' rejuvenated Foreigner, with newcomer Johnny Edwards handling the vocals, tonight will be the first major act to perform at the U.S. Naval Academy's new Alumni Hall in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 1997
Among the books for which to be thankful this November is Rick Bass' newest work, "The Sky, the Stars, the Wilderness" (Houghton Mifflin, 189 pages, $23). For anyone unfamiliar with this Montana author's 11 books, his latest, a collection of three novellas, makes a grand introduction. In the first tale, "The Myths of Bears," a Yukon trapper in the early part of this century stalks his ultimate prey: his own runaway wife. "Where the Sea Used to Be" follows a young Alabama geologist as he drills for oil on land that was once a vast prehistoric sea. And in the title novella, a female narrator looks back elegiacally to her childhood spent on the enormous ranch in west Texas where her family has lived for generations.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | December 6, 1998
A few days ago, I sat down to read a book with the certain, sure intent of damning it, damning the idea of it, using its weaknesses, and its strengths if I found any, to make several points that torture my entrails:There are too many books! Too many books are being published this week! Too many this year! Too many publishers - but, worse yet, too few editors editing the books!Now that I have read that book, strike every word of that paragraph from the record. It's all true, of course, but it doesn't matter.
NEWS
By Christopher Tilghman and Christopher Tilghman,Los Angeles Times | May 1, 1994
People who admire Rick Bass' resplendent 1989 story collection, "The Watch," as well as his several intervening nonfiction books on what the publishers call "the outdoors," have been looking forward to his new book of fiction with unusual interest. Some may be gunning for him, a writer who makes his reputation all too easily with a single book, but most of us are simply eager.We want to see where Mr. Bass' jumpy, oddly lyrical voice -- a voice entirely his own -- takes him a year or two down the road; we want to see if he's getting closer to the truths of his slightly fractured sense of reality, whatever those truths may be. We want to see if he's still putting it all on the line every time he writes.
NEWS
By TIM WARREN PRIZED POSSESSIONS. Avery Corman. Simon & Schuster. 320 pages. $19.95 | March 24, 1991
WINTER: NOTESFROM MONTANA.Rick Bass.Houghton Mifflin/Seymour Lawrence.162 pages. $18.95.This is the sort of winter Rick Bass writes about:"A cold front came down out of Alaska yesterday, dropping the temperature from twenty above to fifteen below in less than an hour -- branches and limbs blowing from the trees, everything tumbling past, and the wind biting, ripping. The temperature kept dropping after dark, crackling cold stars, plunging, bottoming out around thirty-eight, thirty-nine below.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | August 16, 1991
"Ah-ha," said the man at the bow of the bassboat. The fish hit like a trophy bass and took off.He held the rod tip high, but the fish wrapped an old piece of a sunken barge, then swirled a farewell on the top with a yellow spinnerbait in its mouth. It was a rockfish of about 7 pounds, and we would see it a half hour later when it made a free jump -- the lure still dangling from its jaw.By then, the angler was looking at a mutilated soft plastic bait. "From Sluggo to Nub-O," he said, referring to the thick phony worm made by Sluggo, and reduced to a nub by the sharp teeth of a hungry bluefish.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
The fight night crowd streams into Martin's West. Funk and rock rumble from the speakers: Rick James' bass thumping through "Super Freak;" Blondie doing early white-girl rap in "Rapture;" the bouncy Go-Gos proclaiming, "We Got The Beat!"2 "I think I can be champion material," he says.On the ropesThe fight's beginning is a nightmare. Coleman attacks and takes the first round. In the second round, Griffin is tagged with a solid shot to his head. Coleman backs him onto the ropes, all the time swinging, trying to penetrate his defense.
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