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By Los Angeles Times | March 9, 2008
A Father's Law By Richard Wright Just months before his death in Paris in late 1960, Richard Wright was still wrestling with the same demons: class, politics, religion and racism. His last reflections - 360 pages found in a binder - make up A Father's Law, a previously unpublished novel now out to mark the centennial of the author's birth. Assembled by Wright's daughter Julia, the book is being marketed as a "final literary gift" from the author of Native Son and Black Boy. The story's bare bones speak volumes: Rudolph "Ruddy" Turner, the father of the title, is a status-quo sort: A black man, politically conservative, he is about to retire from the Chicago police department and has a nice home in the suburbs, a doting wife and a son, Tommy, in college.
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NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | February 11, 2009
David Bryant Wright, a cabinetmaker and a Marine Corps veteran, was fatally shot Feb. 4, the victim of a robbery attempt in a house in the 1600 block of Gorsuch Ave. The East Baltimore resident was 47. Officer Troy Harris, a city police spokesman, said yesterday that police continue to investigate the case. Mr. Wright was born in Baltimore and raised on Chilton Street. He was a 1979 graduate of Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, where he played varsity basketball and football.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1999
Richard Wright(1908-1960)Wright titled his autobiography "Black Boy." It describes Wright's poor and rough upbringing in Mississippi and Tennessee. It is often considered a fictionialized autobiography because of its novelistic techniques.Wright was one of the first African-Americans to protest the treatment of blacks, notably in his novel "Native Son." The protagonist in the book is Bigger Thomas, a young black man whose accidental killing of a white girl makes clear to him the antagonism blacks receive from mainstream society.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 9, 2008
A Father's Law By Richard Wright Just months before his death in Paris in late 1960, Richard Wright was still wrestling with the same demons: class, politics, religion and racism. His last reflections - 360 pages found in a binder - make up A Father's Law, a previously unpublished novel now out to mark the centennial of the author's birth. Assembled by Wright's daughter Julia, the book is being marketed as a "final literary gift" from the author of Native Son and Black Boy. The story's bare bones speak volumes: Rudolph "Ruddy" Turner, the father of the title, is a status-quo sort: A black man, politically conservative, he is about to retire from the Chicago police department and has a nice home in the suburbs, a doting wife and a son, Tommy, in college.
NEWS
November 23, 2005
On November 19, 2005, MARY D., beloved wife of the late Thomas Severin, devoted mother of the late Joan Wright and husband Walter Wright, loving grandmother of Susan Harbison, Steven and Richard Wright, great grandmother of Kyle Harbison, dear aunt of Jackie and Mike Billings, Molly Billings, Ed and Debbie Liberatore and Jessica Liberatore. Family and friends are invited to attend a Funeral Mass on Wednesday at 11 A.M. in the Stella Maris Chapel, Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery. Arrangements by THE JOHNSON FUNERAL HOME P.A.
NEWS
May 2, 2004
On April 29, 2004, La VERNE ELIZABETH SMITH BONOMO (nee Wright); wife of the late Robert Smith, Sr.; mother of Deborah Culotta and Robert N. and wife Julie Smith, Jr.; grandmother of Adrienne, Casey, Andrea, Matthew, Angela, Greg and Steven; sister of Alan Wright, Richard Wright, Doris Gobbel and the late Arminda Swem. Also survived by three great-grandchildren and son-in-law Joe Culotta. Funeral Services will be held at the ECKHARDT FUNERAL CHAPEL, P.A., MD 30 and Charmil Drive, Manchester, Monday, 12 noon.
NEWS
January 28, 2005
On January 24, 2005 LOUISE "Babs" BONNER WRIGHT (formerly of Towson, MD), beloved wife of Richard Wright and devoted mother of Walter Edward Rose, Jr. and his wife Lauren of Bel Air, MD; Beth Blake and her husband Jeff of Owings Mills, MD and Susan Rose of Frederick, MD. Dear grandmother of Jacob and Brenna Rose and Josuha and Ethan Blake. Loving sister of Upton D., Bonner and his wife Carolyn of Michigan. A Memorial Service will be held in the Chapel of the Church of the Redeemer, 5603 North Charles St. at Melrose Avenue at 11 A.M. on Tuesday, February 1. Inurnment private.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | February 11, 2009
David Bryant Wright, a cabinetmaker and a Marine Corps veteran, was fatally shot Feb. 4, the victim of a robbery attempt in a house in the 1600 block of Gorsuch Ave. The East Baltimore resident was 47. Officer Troy Harris, a city police spokesman, said yesterday that police continue to investigate the case. Mr. Wright was born in Baltimore and raised on Chilton Street. He was a 1979 graduate of Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, where he played varsity basketball and football.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 3, 1995
PBS has consistently done two things better than anyone else on television: the extravagant costume drama and programs devoted to specific artists and their art. Public television has one of each in coming days that are definitely worth going out of your way to see.The first is a documentary on Richard Wright, author of "Native Son," "Black Boy" and other novels, short stories and essays. Wright was a successful man of letters in the 1940s and '50s, when being a man of letters almost always meant being white.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Staff Writer | November 2, 1993
". . . one is an exile only when one is not allowed to live in reasonable peace and dignity . . ."So wrote Oliver W. Harrington in "Look Homeward Baby," one of several essays of remembrance in this collection. The quote is worth noting. It sums up why, in years past, many of our finest black artists left America for saner, more hospitable climes. Richard Wright, Josephine Baker, Dexter Gordon, Henry O. Tanner and others sought a "reasonable peace and dignity" they could not find here, where the burden of race bends spirits, shatters souls.
NEWS
November 23, 2005
On November 19, 2005, MARY D., beloved wife of the late Thomas Severin, devoted mother of the late Joan Wright and husband Walter Wright, loving grandmother of Susan Harbison, Steven and Richard Wright, great grandmother of Kyle Harbison, dear aunt of Jackie and Mike Billings, Molly Billings, Ed and Debbie Liberatore and Jessica Liberatore. Family and friends are invited to attend a Funeral Mass on Wednesday at 11 A.M. in the Stella Maris Chapel, Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery. Arrangements by THE JOHNSON FUNERAL HOME P.A.
NEWS
January 28, 2005
On January 24, 2005 LOUISE "Babs" BONNER WRIGHT (formerly of Towson, MD), beloved wife of Richard Wright and devoted mother of Walter Edward Rose, Jr. and his wife Lauren of Bel Air, MD; Beth Blake and her husband Jeff of Owings Mills, MD and Susan Rose of Frederick, MD. Dear grandmother of Jacob and Brenna Rose and Josuha and Ethan Blake. Loving sister of Upton D., Bonner and his wife Carolyn of Michigan. A Memorial Service will be held in the Chapel of the Church of the Redeemer, 5603 North Charles St. at Melrose Avenue at 11 A.M. on Tuesday, February 1. Inurnment private.
NEWS
May 2, 2004
On April 29, 2004, La VERNE ELIZABETH SMITH BONOMO (nee Wright); wife of the late Robert Smith, Sr.; mother of Deborah Culotta and Robert N. and wife Julie Smith, Jr.; grandmother of Adrienne, Casey, Andrea, Matthew, Angela, Greg and Steven; sister of Alan Wright, Richard Wright, Doris Gobbel and the late Arminda Swem. Also survived by three great-grandchildren and son-in-law Joe Culotta. Funeral Services will be held at the ECKHARDT FUNERAL CHAPEL, P.A., MD 30 and Charmil Drive, Manchester, Monday, 12 noon.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 21, 2004
These words connect the dots," proclaim the three men who wrote and perform Griot. The dots they connect form nothing less than a swift survey of African-American cultural history, delivered artfully, energetically and briskly. Commissioned by the Theatre Project after one of the performers, Al Letson, revealed his versatile talents there last season in his one-man show Essential Personnel, Griot takes this poet/actor's gifts to another level by showcasing his collaborative talents. Under the direction of Barbara Williams, Letson is joined on stage by Larry Knight and David Girard Pugh.
NEWS
December 4, 2003
Dr. Richard Lee Wright, a psychiatrist on the staff of several area hospitals, died Nov. 27 at Sinai Hospital of an apparent heart attack. The Roland Park resident was 52. Born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Dr. Wright earned his bachelor's and medical degrees at the University of Iowa, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He moved to Baltimore in 1977 and lived in Rodgers Forge. He completed his residency at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital, where he practiced for four years. Dr. Wright also studied at the Baltimore-Washington Psychoanalytic Institute.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
Sixth-grader Loren Nelson had heard about Jim Crow, but it wasn't until she interviewed her grandparents -- and heard stories of segregated bathrooms, "white" and "colored" water fountains and hotels that didn't allow blacks -- that she understood what it meant. As part of an oral history project at Baltimore's Midtown Academy, the 11-year-old and 65 of her classmates have been learning firsthand about the institutionalized discrimination that other city pupils have only read about in books.
TOPIC
By Gerald Horne | February 28, 1999
ANY DISCUSSION OF WHITE America's great writers is likely to produce names such as Mark Twain, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Theodore Dreiser and William Faulkner. When it comes to great African-American writers, Zora Neale Hurston, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed and Alice Walker are likely to be at the forefront of the discussions.But there is one writer who's name is seldom mentioned with greatness who rightfully belongs among the giants of American literature. His name is Richard Wright.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 21, 2004
These words connect the dots," proclaim the three men who wrote and perform Griot. The dots they connect form nothing less than a swift survey of African-American cultural history, delivered artfully, energetically and briskly. Commissioned by the Theatre Project after one of the performers, Al Letson, revealed his versatile talents there last season in his one-man show Essential Personnel, Griot takes this poet/actor's gifts to another level by showcasing his collaborative talents. Under the direction of Barbara Williams, Letson is joined on stage by Larry Knight and David Girard Pugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1999
Richard Wright(1908-1960)Wright titled his autobiography "Black Boy." It describes Wright's poor and rough upbringing in Mississippi and Tennessee. It is often considered a fictionialized autobiography because of its novelistic techniques.Wright was one of the first African-Americans to protest the treatment of blacks, notably in his novel "Native Son." The protagonist in the book is Bigger Thomas, a young black man whose accidental killing of a white girl makes clear to him the antagonism blacks receive from mainstream society.
TOPIC
By Gerald Horne | February 28, 1999
ANY DISCUSSION OF WHITE America's great writers is likely to produce names such as Mark Twain, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Theodore Dreiser and William Faulkner. When it comes to great African-American writers, Zora Neale Hurston, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed and Alice Walker are likely to be at the forefront of the discussions.But there is one writer who's name is seldom mentioned with greatness who rightfully belongs among the giants of American literature. His name is Richard Wright.
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