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NEWS
November 28, 2003
John Richard Wagner, a retired major with the Baltimore City Police Department, died Saturday at home, apparently from a heart attack. The Rosedale resident was 61. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Wagner graduated from Kenwood High School in 1961. He joined the Marine Corps and served in Vietnam until 1965, when he was discharged with the rank of corporal. In 1967, he began his police career in the city's Northeastern District. He worked in the criminal investigation and tactical divisions, rising through the ranks to second in command in the Northeastern District.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
The arts world tends to think in terms of September-to-June seasons, rather than calendar years, but it's still fun to look back on the past 12 months and relive the performances that offered extra satisfaction. Although I may have missed some great stuff along the way - it's pretty near impossible to catch everything packed into a given year - I experienced plenty of rewarding activity on the classical music and theater scenes. Here are my picks for the best performing-arts events in Baltimore during 2013.
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FEATURES
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 5, 1998
JERUSALEM - As a doctoral student in New York, Yehudit Etzion fell captive to the music of Richard Wagner, a favorite of Adolph Hitler. Seduced by the 19th-century German composer's harmonic language, his symphonic writing, she attended every performance she could of his operas.Today, Etzion is a musicology professor in Israel. She teaches Wagner in her classes, explaining his influence on this century's great composers. But Etzion knows that Wagner's music evokes haunting memories for many of her fellow Israelis, the survivors of the Nazi death camps.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Gottfried Wagner, author, director, musicologist and great-grandson of Richard Wagner, had a significant role in the development of "Lost Childhood," an opera about the Holocaust and its aftermath. The work, composed by Janice Hamer to a libretto by Baltimore poet Mary Azrael, will be performed (in concert form) Saturday at Strathmore. Wagner, who inspired one of the two main characters in the opera, plans to attend the performance. Prior to leaving his home in Italy for the trip here, Wagner replied to some questions I sent by email.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | February 28, 1999
The music of Richard Wagner's opera, "Tristan und Isolde," can affect you like a jingle; you can't get it out of your head. The difference is that it's not 60 seconds of harmless fluff. It's four hours of music, alternating between erotic yearning and erotic bliss, that continues to grind its gears in your ears long after it's over. Fortunate listeners get a persistent headache; less fortunate ones forget themselves and go mad.Performances of "Tristan" are rare. The current Washington Opera production, which opened last night at the Kennedy Center, is its first in almost 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
As you must know, May 22 is Richard Wagner's 200th birthday, and, as you must have guessed, Midweek Madness couldn't let that milestone go unturned. In fact, it will take at least three posts to do justice to this musical genius (and repugnant human specimen). Part 1 just had to be delivered by Bugs and Elmer -- predictable, yes, but still essential.
NEWS
May 12, 2004
On May 10, 2004, NELLIE C. (nee Wagner); devoted mother of Robert C. Rinker and his wife Patricia, Denise Jones and her husband Charles; loving sister of Francis Goodall, Mary Sue Lindquist, Roxy Shannon and Richard Wagner. Also survived by numerous nieces, nephews, and friends. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Road, on Thursday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held on Friday, 1:30 P.M. Interment Holly Hill Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
October 14, 2005
Opera opening -- Annapolis Opera will open its 2005-2006 season with Opera auf Deutsch at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 22 at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Annapolis. A celebration of German wine and food will be featured along with a selection of arias by Richard Strauss, Richard Wagner, Kurt Weill, Franz Lehar and others. Performers will include Lori Hultgren, Danielle Talamantes, Yvette Smith and Michael Gallant (at right). Tickets are $60 and must be ordered by Monday. For ticket and series subscriptions, call 410-267-8135.
NEWS
June 11, 2006
On June 8, 2006, BEULAH MARY DORSEY (nee Brown); beloved wife of the late William E. Dorsey; loving mother of Joan L. Griebel and her husband Joseph and Patricia M. Wagner and her husband Richard; devoted grandmother of Joseph Griebel, Judy Martini, Valerie Wagner-Hippen, Richard Wagner, Jr. and Tricia Amburgey; cherished great-grandmother of nine. Christian Wake Service will be held at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, Inc., 7922 Wise Avenue, on Monday 4:30 P.M. Friends may call Monday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Shrine of the Little Flower Catholic Church, Tuesday 10 A.M. Interment Most Holy Redeemer Cemetery.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | March 31, 2007
When Washington National Opera decided to tackle its first-ever staging of Richard Wagner's The Ring of the Nibelung, an awesome rite of passage for any opera company, it set out to give the epic fresh context. And that's what it got from director Francesca Zambello. Dubbed "the American Ring," her version substitutes this country's myths and iconography for the original Norse/German ones in this tale of gods, heroes, contracts and loyalties. If you go Die Walkure will be performed at 1 p.m. tomorrow and 6 p.m. April 5, 9, 14 and 17 at the Kennedy Center in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
As you must know, May 22 is Richard Wagner's 200th birthday, and, as you must have guessed, Midweek Madness couldn't let that milestone go unturned. In fact, it will take at least three posts to do justice to this musical genius (and repugnant human specimen). Part 1 just had to be delivered by Bugs and Elmer -- predictable, yes, but still essential.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2013
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra didn't think small when deciding to acknowledge the 2013 bicentennial of the birth of revolutionary composer, revolting human being Richard Wagner. Three separate programs were plugged into the season, starting in February with a sizzling sampling of Wagner's operas that included Act 1 of “Die Walkure,” the second part of Wagner's gargantuan cycle, “The Ring of the Nibelungen.” This week, we're getting a hefty sampling of the entire “Ring,” without words, via a seamless orchestral arrangement by Henk de Vlieger.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
The Baltimore Symphony is about to become one of the very few, if not the first, major classical orchestras in the United States to officially appoint a playwright in residence. This weekend, Didi Balle will preside over the third of her "symphonic plays" to be performed by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. The form, which Balle invented, combines a live orchestra, a conductor who delivers a scripted narrative and professional actors. In a news release, conductor Marin Alsop said that the appointment formalizes a relationship between Balle and the symphony that began in 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra chose some of Richard Wagner's most radiant and involving music for a program this weekend to mark the composer's bicentennial year. The results were pretty radiant, too, Friday night at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, and will likely be even more so in the repeat performances, as things settle in more firmly. As a person, Wagner was deplorable - vain, arrogant, manipulative, viciously and relentlessly anti-Semitic. As an artist, he reached the highest peaks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
It takes little effort to find severe problems with the character of Richard Wagner, the man who was born two centuries ago and, as he was the first to acknowledge, became one of history's greatest composers. It's much harder to dismiss his music, which is receiving extra attention around the world during this bicentennial year. Locally, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is taking a close look at Wagner over the next few months. The focus starts this week with a program featuring, in concert form, Act 1 from "Die Walkure," the second of four operas that comprise "The Ring of the Nibelung," the epic filled with heroic and villainous mortals, giants, troubled gods, Valkyries on horseback, horned helmets, a mighty sword and, of course, a magical ring.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2011
A man who told police that he killed his landlord because he believed the homeowner was a warlock who was conjuring spells against him was found not criminally responsible Wednesday and will be placed in a state mental hospital. Neal Jesse Manning, 41, had descended rapidly into mental illness before he killed Harry Allan Wagner just past midnight on Jan. 4, according to a state psychiatric evaluation. Wagner, a 57-year-old cargo company dispatcher, was on his living room couch in his Pasadena home watching television when Manning, who had rented a room in his house for less than a year, shot him with a handgun and shotgun.
NEWS
January 5, 1995
The marketing of classical music has always been an uphill battle. Only a minuscule fraction of record, tape and CD buyers go into the stores looking for Beethoven instead of Beastie Boys. But what classical music lovers lack in numbers they more than make up in devotion.That's why getting a wider audience hooked on classics can add up to big bucks over time -- and why record companies, concert promoters and local musical organizations are always on the lookout for new ways to pique the interest of pop music listeners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
The Baltimore Symphony is about to become one of the very few, if not the first, major classical orchestras in the United States to officially appoint a playwright in residence. This weekend, Didi Balle will preside over the third of her "symphonic plays" to be performed by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. The form, which Balle invented, combines a live orchestra, a conductor who delivers a scripted narrative and professional actors. In a news release, conductor Marin Alsop said that the appointment formalizes a relationship between Balle and the symphony that began in 2008.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2008
Longtime Annapolis sailor Jason Stearns sailed into his debut role as that most famous sailor - Richard Wagner's The Flying Dutchman - at the prestigious summer opera festival in Savonlinna, Finland, last month. Back home, the veteran opera singer recounted the rigors of performing in the Olavinlinna Castle, a 15th-century fortress. "You can imagine my surprise when I was shown how I was to make my first entrance to the stage. I had to climb up a very high ladder in the back of the castle - maybe 15 feet high - and then crawl through one of those cannon holes, usually in pouring rain, barely big enough to fit through.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | March 31, 2007
When Washington National Opera decided to tackle its first-ever staging of Richard Wagner's The Ring of the Nibelung, an awesome rite of passage for any opera company, it set out to give the epic fresh context. And that's what it got from director Francesca Zambello. Dubbed "the American Ring," her version substitutes this country's myths and iconography for the original Norse/German ones in this tale of gods, heroes, contracts and loyalties. If you go Die Walkure will be performed at 1 p.m. tomorrow and 6 p.m. April 5, 9, 14 and 17 at the Kennedy Center in Washington.
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