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Richard Thompson

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By Jim Farber and Jim Farber,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 11, 2005
It's hard to consider any musician lazy who has batted out 21 albums of original material, plus a dozen live releases. But Richard Thompson somehow manages to see himself that way. "If you're going to be any kind of artist you have to be on the case 24 hours a day," he says. "Sometimes I have to pull myself up short and remind myself of my obligations." Thompson even thinks it "neglectful" of his muse that he never before recorded an album like his new one, Front Parlour Ballads. The disc, out Aug. 9, is the first studio work in Thompson's illustrious 38-year career that comprises entirely original songs on which he manned every instrument himself.
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NEWS
February 7, 2014
The controversy over officials using state skyboxes at area stadiums to entertain political allies and campaign donors does not end ( "Skybox guests pay for the honor," Feb. 5). But the more important question is why the state has a skybox in the first place. I don't know how much a skybox costs, but I'll bet it isn't cheap. It's my understanding the state also has skyboxes at M&T Bank Stadium and at Oriole Park at Camden Yards . Maryland, the state that loves to tax, tax and tax, owns skyboxes at all three area stadiums - all paid for with taxpayer dollars.
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NEWS
July 26, 1996
In yesterday's LIVE section, an incorrect name was listed for Richard Thompson and His Band, which performs Oct. 14 at the Senator Theater, 5904 York Road.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 7/26/96
NEWS
February 8, 2009
On Friday, February 6, 2009, JAMES DEWEY, beloved husband of Margarete Thompson, loving father of Barbara Bagwell, Kathleen Thompson and Sandra Thompson, devoted brother of Robert Thompson, Richard Thompson and Eloise Benton. Also survived by two grandchildren. Friends may call on Monday, February 9 from 7 to 9 P.M. at the Eline Funeral Home, 934 S. Main St., Hampstead. Funeral Services and Interment will be private. Memorial contributions may be sent to the American Cancer Society, 8219 Town Center Dr., PO Box 435, Nottingham, MD 21236.
NEWS
February 8, 2009
On Friday, February 6, 2009, JAMES DEWEY, beloved husband of Margarete Thompson, loving father of Barbara Bagwell, Kathleen Thompson and Sandra Thompson, devoted brother of Robert Thompson, Richard Thompson and Eloise Benton. Also survived by two grandchildren. Friends may call on Monday, February 9 from 7 to 9 P.M. at the Eline Funeral Home, 934 S. Main St., Hampstead. Funeral Services and Interment will be private. Memorial contributions may be sent to the American Cancer Society, 8219 Town Center Dr., PO Box 435, Nottingham, MD 21236.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 15, 1993
By now, Shawn Colvin ought to be used to being compared to Joni Mitchell. Reviewers have done it repeatedly, pointing out how songs like "Round of Blues," from her current album, "Fat City," echo Mitchell's sharp-etched imagery and idiosyncratic melodic lines. Colvin's liner notes for the album even underscored the point, thanking Mitchell with the words "me wimp, you master."Still, she seems genuinely pleased when another similarity is pointed out -- that both are considered folk singers when neither really play much in the way of folk music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 9, 1991
Richard Thompson is the sort of songwriter who gets quote a lot, particularly in reviews. Critics love taking close looks at his tart, wickedly detailed lyrics, marching them across the page as if all the power of Thompson's music could somehow be extracted from a few rhyming cadences.Which, when you think about it, is a pretty silly idea. For one thing, focusing exclusively on the words means ignoring the music, an approach that seems to forget what separates lyrics from poetry in the first place; for another, nobody -- music critics included -- notices the words in a song before hearing the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 11, 1994
ENIGMA 2: THE CROSS OF CHANGESEnigma (Charisma 39236) On its first album, Enigma offered a dazzling blend of unlikely elements, mixing muscular house beats, lush synths and sampled Gregorian chants into the eerie, unforgettable "Sadeness." So how does the group's second album, "The Cross of Changes," top that trick? By turning to art rock, naturally. Granted, there's still plenty of dance-beat vitality to the rhythm tracks, and "Return to Innocence" does a more-than-passable job of emulating the exoticism of "Sadeness."
NEWS
By Gil Sandler | October 4, 1994
RECENT OFFICIAL reports confirm what we already knew: The delivery of the U.S. mail in the Baltimore area is a service in need of fixing. With that in mind, the story of Richard Thompson seems particularly quaint. Back in the 1920s, Mr. Thompson depended on same-day delivery of mail in Baltimore and got it without paying a premium price.Mr. Thompson's secret: He knew the speed of Baltimore's Railway Mail Service -- the mobile postal service which began exactly 100 years ago today on Oct. 4, 1894.
NEWS
February 7, 2014
The controversy over officials using state skyboxes at area stadiums to entertain political allies and campaign donors does not end ( "Skybox guests pay for the honor," Feb. 5). But the more important question is why the state has a skybox in the first place. I don't know how much a skybox costs, but I'll bet it isn't cheap. It's my understanding the state also has skyboxes at M&T Bank Stadium and at Oriole Park at Camden Yards . Maryland, the state that loves to tax, tax and tax, owns skyboxes at all three area stadiums - all paid for with taxpayer dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Farber and Jim Farber,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 11, 2005
It's hard to consider any musician lazy who has batted out 21 albums of original material, plus a dozen live releases. But Richard Thompson somehow manages to see himself that way. "If you're going to be any kind of artist you have to be on the case 24 hours a day," he says. "Sometimes I have to pull myself up short and remind myself of my obligations." Thompson even thinks it "neglectful" of his muse that he never before recorded an album like his new one, Front Parlour Ballads. The disc, out Aug. 9, is the first studio work in Thompson's illustrious 38-year career that comprises entirely original songs on which he manned every instrument himself.
NEWS
July 26, 1996
In yesterday's LIVE section, an incorrect name was listed for Richard Thompson and His Band, which performs Oct. 14 at the Senator Theater, 5904 York Road.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 7/26/96
NEWS
By Gil Sandler | October 4, 1994
RECENT OFFICIAL reports confirm what we already knew: The delivery of the U.S. mail in the Baltimore area is a service in need of fixing. With that in mind, the story of Richard Thompson seems particularly quaint. Back in the 1920s, Mr. Thompson depended on same-day delivery of mail in Baltimore and got it without paying a premium price.Mr. Thompson's secret: He knew the speed of Baltimore's Railway Mail Service -- the mobile postal service which began exactly 100 years ago today on Oct. 4, 1894.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 11, 1994
ENIGMA 2: THE CROSS OF CHANGESEnigma (Charisma 39236) On its first album, Enigma offered a dazzling blend of unlikely elements, mixing muscular house beats, lush synths and sampled Gregorian chants into the eerie, unforgettable "Sadeness." So how does the group's second album, "The Cross of Changes," top that trick? By turning to art rock, naturally. Granted, there's still plenty of dance-beat vitality to the rhythm tracks, and "Return to Innocence" does a more-than-passable job of emulating the exoticism of "Sadeness."
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 15, 1993
By now, Shawn Colvin ought to be used to being compared to Joni Mitchell. Reviewers have done it repeatedly, pointing out how songs like "Round of Blues," from her current album, "Fat City," echo Mitchell's sharp-etched imagery and idiosyncratic melodic lines. Colvin's liner notes for the album even underscored the point, thanking Mitchell with the words "me wimp, you master."Still, she seems genuinely pleased when another similarity is pointed out -- that both are considered folk singers when neither really play much in the way of folk music.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 10, 1991
Here's a riddle for you: Two singers share the same concert bill. One performs solo, accompanying himself on acoustic guitar and piano, the other performs with a band, playing electric guitar for most of the set. Which one was the folk singer and which the rock and roller?If you guessed that Mr. Acoustic was the rocker and Mr. Electric the folkie, it's probably because you were at Pier 6 last night to see John Hiatt (acoustic) and Richard Thompson (electric). And if, indeed, you were on hand, it surely won't be necessary to add that the music was wonderful regardless of style.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 10, 1991
Here's a riddle for you: Two singers share the same concert bill. One performs solo, accompanying himself on acoustic guitar and piano, the other performs with a band, playing electric guitar for most of the set. Which one was the folk singer and which the rock and roller?If you guessed that Mr. Acoustic was the rocker and Mr. Electric the folkie, it's probably because you were at Pier 6 last night to see John Hiatt (acoustic) and Richard Thompson (electric). And if, indeed, you were on hand, it surely won't be necessary to add that the music was wonderful regardless of style.
FEATURES
By Scott Benarde and Scott Benarde,Cox News Service | June 27, 1991
SUCCESS has not changed or spoiled singer-guitarist Bonnie Raitt. Last year Raitt won four Grammys -- three for her 1989 album "Nick of Time." Raitt's follow-up album, "Luck of the Draw" (Capitol Records), released today, is a close cousin in mood and style to "Nick of Time."Raitt wisely hasn't tried to fix what ain't broke; her music remains firmly rooted in Delta blues and Southern rhythm and blues. She's used the same producer, Don Was, and some of the same backup musicians and songwriters who helped make "Nick of Time" a hit that sold 3 million copies, resulting in a stellar career comeback.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 9, 1991
Richard Thompson is the sort of songwriter who gets quote a lot, particularly in reviews. Critics love taking close looks at his tart, wickedly detailed lyrics, marching them across the page as if all the power of Thompson's music could somehow be extracted from a few rhyming cadences.Which, when you think about it, is a pretty silly idea. For one thing, focusing exclusively on the words means ignoring the music, an approach that seems to forget what separates lyrics from poetry in the first place; for another, nobody -- music critics included -- notices the words in a song before hearing the music.
FEATURES
By Scott Benarde and Scott Benarde,Cox News Service | June 27, 1991
SUCCESS has not changed or spoiled singer-guitarist Bonnie Raitt. Last year Raitt won four Grammys -- three for her 1989 album "Nick of Time." Raitt's follow-up album, "Luck of the Draw" (Capitol Records), released today, is a close cousin in mood and style to "Nick of Time."Raitt wisely hasn't tried to fix what ain't broke; her music remains firmly rooted in Delta blues and Southern rhythm and blues. She's used the same producer, Don Was, and some of the same backup musicians and songwriters who helped make "Nick of Time" a hit that sold 3 million copies, resulting in a stellar career comeback.
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