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Richard Taylor

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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1994
Richard J. Taylor, a department store maintenance worker and college student, died early Sunday after apparently falling asleep at the wheel of his car and striking a tree near the intersection of Interstate 95 and the Baltimore Beltway.The Carney resident was 20.He had worked at the Nordstrom store in Towson since 1993. He started in men's furnishings and transferred to maintenance, where his responsibilities included lighting, air conditioning and working on special events.Damon Derossi, director of maintenance at Nordstrom and a close friend, said Mr. Taylor "was very friendly with all those he came in contact with.
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NEWS
September 2, 2007
On August 29, RICHARD TAYLOR of Catonsville, MD. Beloved husband of the late Lois C. Taylor; loving father of Nancy Lee Taylor and Glenda Joyce Taylor; caring brother of Jean Blake and Naomi Stern. Family and friends are invited to call at STERLING-ASHTON-SCHWAB-WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Ave., Catonsville on Thursday from 9-10am. Graveside services will be at Druid Ridge Cemetery at 10:30am.
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FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | April 21, 1996
Richard Taylor's house is a work in progress. But then, in the 18 years he's lived there, it's always been a work in progress.You might think that someone who designs other people's houses for a living would want his own to be a showplace, perfect down to the last detail. But that's not necessarily so."Most designers use their house as a lab," says Mr. Taylor, whose firm is Taylor-Siegmeister Associates. "I'm always fooling around with things."The result is a home that's charming and surprisingly au courant.
NEWS
April 24, 2004
On April 20, 2004 ELIZABETH COOPER TAYLOR beloved mother of Richard Taylor and other loving family and friends. Friends may call at the JOSEPH L. RUSS FUNERAL HOME, 2222 W. North Avenue on Sunday from 2 to 6 p.m. Family hour Monday 11 a.m. with funeral to follow at 11:30 at Grace Presbyterian Church, 2604 Bannister Road. Interment Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Glen Burnie, MD.
NEWS
September 16, 1995
C. Richard TaylorHarvard professorC. Richard Taylor, 56, a professor of biology at Harvard University who studied why prehistoric kangaroos survived the advent of man and why certain antelopes almost never drink, died on Sunday in Concord, Mass., where he lived.Tom Helmore, 91, a debonair Broadway and film actor in the 1940s and '50s, died Tuesday in Longboat Key, Fla. On stage and in films, he specialized in comedies, playing opposite Ginger Rogers, among others.Wilson Desir, 57, a Haitian consul general in New York who was exiled from his homeland for two decades, died Wednesday of complications from diabetes in New York.
NEWS
April 24, 2004
On April 20, 2004 ELIZABETH COOPER TAYLOR beloved mother of Richard Taylor and other loving family and friends. Friends may call at the JOSEPH L. RUSS FUNERAL HOME, 2222 W. North Avenue on Sunday from 2 to 6 p.m. Family hour Monday 11 a.m. with funeral to follow at 11:30 at Grace Presbyterian Church, 2604 Bannister Road. Interment Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Glen Burnie, MD.
NEWS
September 2, 2007
On August 29, RICHARD TAYLOR of Catonsville, MD. Beloved husband of the late Lois C. Taylor; loving father of Nancy Lee Taylor and Glenda Joyce Taylor; caring brother of Jean Blake and Naomi Stern. Family and friends are invited to call at STERLING-ASHTON-SCHWAB-WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Ave., Catonsville on Thursday from 9-10am. Graveside services will be at Druid Ridge Cemetery at 10:30am.
NEWS
October 20, 1990
If it were anything less than the Nobel Prize, the news that Americans have yet again won in the sciences would by now be old hat. Americans take home Nobels routinely, it seems, especially in the sciences.Elias James Corey, a Harvard researcher, won for developing new methods for synthesizing complex molecules. His work reordered the world of pharmaceutical manufacturing, allowing easier and simpler derivation of new drugs from natural compounds. Stanford physicist Richard Taylor and two MIT colleagues, Henry Kendall and Jerome Friedman, former graduate school classmates, won laurels for particle physics.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing Writer | June 17, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- This Sunday evening, the Westminster Inn and Fly by Night Promotions will be serving up a tasty musical menu featuring local talent performing their original works.About a dozen area musicians will share rhythm and blues, country, rock and folk music as a part of "Songwriters In Concert," from 6 to 10 p.m. in the Courtyard Cafe at the Westminster Inn."Songwriters in Concert" is the fourth in a series of performances highlighting the talents of not only local artists but also artists from surrounding Baltimore, Howard and Montgomery counties, as well as from Pennsylvania and Virginia.
NEWS
August 24, 1994
From time to time, voters decide that the best cure for government's ills is to throw the rascals out. Many politicians have weathered episodes of anti-incumbency, but few have been as successful at rising above it all as Maryland's Comptroller of the Treasury, Louis L. Goldstein. After nine terms -- 36 years -- in the office, Mr. Goldstein is now asking Democratic voters to nominate him for one more term. They should.Mr. Goldstein is 81, and some suggest his legendary energy is lagging a bit. But there is no evidence that he does not remain in firm control of his office, or that his vigilance in his various duties has slipped.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2004
COLLEGE PARK - Richard Taylor could be sleeping in. He could be back home in Virginia, lying in his bed, getting ready for another stress-free day at Centreville High School in Fairfax County. In many respects, he should be. After all, the slow march toward graduation, the lazy second semester of senior year, has become something of a rite of passage in this country. Taylor might be laughing with friends, flirting with girls, picking out a tuxedo for the prom and savoring the final days of youth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | July 9, 2000
June 11: "Mid-Summer Fest." Benefits CollegeBound Foundation and Joe Sandusky Fund of the Baltimore Community Foundation. Games, hors d'oeuvres, beer, wine, live music by O'Malley's March. On the pier at the Baltimore Museum of Industry, 1415 Key Highway. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets $50 in advance, $60 at the door. Call 410-783-2905. Around Town Among the glorious pageantry and spectacle of OpSail 2000, one favorite OpSail moment for the man who arranged the event was a private one. Sail Baltimore President Bill MacIntosh had just received a plaque from the captain of Guayas in a ceremony aboard the 257-foot Ecuadorean ship, which was docked near the Harborplace amphitheater.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | April 21, 1996
Richard Taylor's house is a work in progress. But then, in the 18 years he's lived there, it's always been a work in progress.You might think that someone who designs other people's houses for a living would want his own to be a showplace, perfect down to the last detail. But that's not necessarily so."Most designers use their house as a lab," says Mr. Taylor, whose firm is Taylor-Siegmeister Associates. "I'm always fooling around with things."The result is a home that's charming and surprisingly au courant.
BUSINESS
By Deidre N. McCabe and Deidre N. McCabe,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1995
You've scrimped. You've saved. You've looked at a hundred houses in two dozen neighborhoods and finally found your dream home.It's got the living room, dining room, den, kitchen, bedrooms, bathrooms, foyer, hallways -- everything you've ever wanted.Well, perhaps you could live without that animal print wallpaper in the den. And the black and purple master bedroom scheme is not really you. And that wallpaper in the powder room -- what were they thinking?Whether they buy a new home, which is likely to be "builder's beige" from top to bottom, or a resale, which may be completely decorated but in someone else's taste, most new home owners do a fair amount of decorating.
NEWS
September 16, 1995
C. Richard TaylorHarvard professorC. Richard Taylor, 56, a professor of biology at Harvard University who studied why prehistoric kangaroos survived the advent of man and why certain antelopes almost never drink, died on Sunday in Concord, Mass., where he lived.Tom Helmore, 91, a debonair Broadway and film actor in the 1940s and '50s, died Tuesday in Longboat Key, Fla. On stage and in films, he specialized in comedies, playing opposite Ginger Rogers, among others.Wilson Desir, 57, a Haitian consul general in New York who was exiled from his homeland for two decades, died Wednesday of complications from diabetes in New York.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1994
Richard J. Taylor, a department store maintenance worker and college student, died early Sunday after apparently falling asleep at the wheel of his car and striking a tree near the intersection of Interstate 95 and the Baltimore Beltway.The Carney resident was 20.He had worked at the Nordstrom store in Towson since 1993. He started in men's furnishings and transferred to maintenance, where his responsibilities included lighting, air conditioning and working on special events.Damon Derossi, director of maintenance at Nordstrom and a close friend, said Mr. Taylor "was very friendly with all those he came in contact with.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | July 9, 2000
June 11: "Mid-Summer Fest." Benefits CollegeBound Foundation and Joe Sandusky Fund of the Baltimore Community Foundation. Games, hors d'oeuvres, beer, wine, live music by O'Malley's March. On the pier at the Baltimore Museum of Industry, 1415 Key Highway. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets $50 in advance, $60 at the door. Call 410-783-2905. Around Town Among the glorious pageantry and spectacle of OpSail 2000, one favorite OpSail moment for the man who arranged the event was a private one. Sail Baltimore President Bill MacIntosh had just received a plaque from the captain of Guayas in a ceremony aboard the 257-foot Ecuadorean ship, which was docked near the Harborplace amphitheater.
NEWS
August 24, 1994
From time to time, voters decide that the best cure for government's ills is to throw the rascals out. Many politicians have weathered episodes of anti-incumbency, but few have been as successful at rising above it all as Maryland's Comptroller of the Treasury, Louis L. Goldstein. After nine terms -- 36 years -- in the office, Mr. Goldstein is now asking Democratic voters to nominate him for one more term. They should.Mr. Goldstein is 81, and some suggest his legendary energy is lagging a bit. But there is no evidence that he does not remain in firm control of his office, or that his vigilance in his various duties has slipped.
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