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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 17, 2001
With a split screen, it's technically possible to watch two TV shows simultaneously. If those shows were, say, I Love Lucy and Dragnet, the resulting fusion would be more or less akin to what happens in Richard Strauss' opera Ariadne auf Naxos. If you added to the mix a little Monty Python's Flying Circus and South Park, you might get something akin to Peabody Opera Theatre's engaging production of Ariadne. Except that the music wouldn't be nearly as glorious. Even played straight, the opera has plenty of zaniness.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
In case you pay attention to liturgical calendars, or in case you don't, Nov. 2 is All Souls' Days in Catholic tradition. That's reason enough for me to share one of my favorite art songs -- "Allerseelen" ("All Souls' Day") by Richard Strauss. That guy sure could write 'em. This vintage, gorgeous performance by tenor Rudolf Schock should please all souls. Needless to say, the song isn't about the actual fesast day, but about love. Here's a loose translation of the poem by Hermann von Gilm zu Roseneg: Put the fragrant reseda on the table.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | November 28, 2004
If Gustav Mahler composed the most profound farewell in all of music, through the combined expressive weight of his Ninth Symphony and Das Lied von Der Erde, Richard Strauss surely composed the most sublime, through his Four Last Songs. I don't think I could ever tire of hearing those Mahler works. Same for the Strauss, whether on records -- I've collected at least 20 versions -- or in concert. Something about these songs for soprano and orchestra draws me in, moves me every time. Technical characteristics or interpretive decisions of an individual performance may disappoint me, but never (so far)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
In the fresh-face department, German conductor Christoph Konig has a lot going for him in his Baltimore Symphony Orchestra debut this week. He's tall, young and handsome, attributes that count in classical music circles more than ever these days. And, on Thursday night at Meyerhoff Hall, he seemed perfectly at ease with the musicians and the audience. The program originally was to have featured Mahler's First Symphony, which would have given the conductor a more revealing platform, perhaps.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 22, 1996
Richard Strauss, "Four Last Songs," five songs for soprano and orchestra and "Rosenkavalier" Suite, performed by soprano Renee Fleming (in the songs), the Houston Symphony, Christoph Eschenbach conducting (BMG Classics 09026-68539-2); Strauss, "Four Last Songs," two songs for soprano and orchestra and 13 songs for soprano and piano, performed by soprano Barbara Hendricks, the Philadelphia Orchestra and Wolfgang Sawallisch, conductor and pianist (EMI Classics 5 55594):These competing versions of Richard Strauss' autumnal "Four Last Songs" -- in which the upstart Houston Symphony clearly outplays the revered Philadelphia Orchestra -- demonstrate that traditional notions of orchestral hierarchy need revision.
NEWS
October 14, 2005
Opera opening -- Annapolis Opera will open its 2005-2006 season with Opera auf Deutsch at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 22 at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Annapolis. A celebration of German wine and food will be featured along with a selection of arias by Richard Strauss, Richard Wagner, Kurt Weill, Franz Lehar and others. Performers will include Lori Hultgren, Danielle Talamantes, Yvette Smith and Michael Gallant (at right). Tickets are $60 and must be ordered by Monday. For ticket and series subscriptions, call 410-267-8135.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 11, 2006
If Donald Trump were a composer, he'd probably write something like Ein Heldenleben - A Hero's Life - the colossal tone poem by Richard Strauss. It outraged some listeners back at the end of the 19th century because it seemed so boastful, so self-important, even just plain megalomaniacal, what with the 34-year-old Strauss quoting freely from his own works throughout the piece, as if he were the hero in question. The nerve. If you go The BSO performs at 8 tonight at the Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda; 3 p.m. tomorrow at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $25-$78.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
In case you pay attention to liturgical calendars, or in case you don't, Nov. 2 is All Souls' Days in Catholic tradition. That's reason enough for me to share one of my favorite art songs -- "Allerseelen" ("All Souls' Day") by Richard Strauss. That guy sure could write 'em. This vintage, gorgeous performance by tenor Rudolf Schock should please all souls. Needless to say, the song isn't about the actual fesast day, but about love. Here's a loose translation of the poem by Hermann von Gilm zu Roseneg: Put the fragrant reseda on the table.
NEWS
July 3, 1996
Steve Tesich, 53, the playwright and Academy Award-winning screenwriter of "Breaking Away," died Monday of a heart attack in Nova Scotia, where he was vacationing with his family.He won the Oscar in 1979 for "Breaking Away," a story about a group of teen-age "townies" in Bloomington, Ind., and their rivalry with the more privileged college students at nearby Indiana University.A native of Yugoslavia, Mr. Tesich came to this country when he was 14 and attended Indiana University on a wrestling scholarship.
NEWS
March 1, 1991
Services for Charles F. Strauss, a retired model maker for the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, will take place at 11 a.m. today at the Holy Nativity Lutheran Church, 1200 Linden Ave., Arbutus.Mr. Strauss, who was 75 and lived on Greystone Road in Arbutus, died Monday of cancer at St. Agnes Hospital.He retired in 1981 after 20 years of making wooden models of missiles, satellites and their parts at the laboratory.He was given an achievement award by the director of the laboratory for his work.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | March 26, 2008
Saturday evening's concert by the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra may have been billed as a Spring Rhapsody, but if anyone came to Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts expecting pastel hues and light, frilly fare, they got disabused of those notions in a hurry. With works by Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakoff, Sergei Rachmaninoff and Richard Strauss on the bill, it was a night of big sounds and grand gestures. The program began with Rimsky's "Russian Easter Overture," a festive depiction of Russian Orthodoxy's Easter liturgy, complete with incense, icons, glowing candles, bearded priests, modal chants, fluttering angels and church bells chiming to the glory of Mother Russia's earthy, exotic celebration of the Resurrection.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 2007
The Columbia Orchestra begins its 30th anniversary season tomorrow evening at 7:30 in the Jim Rouse Theater at Wilde Lake High School. Jason Love, beginning his ninth year as conductor, will lead works by Bach, Tchaikovsky and Richard Strauss. In this first subscription concert of the anniversary season, as in the three that will follow, the orchestra will celebrate its past as well as its highly successful present. The 3rd Brandenburg Concerto of Johann Sebastian Bach, for example, is the first work the orchestra played at its inaugural concert three decades ago. "It was a small chamber orchestra back then," Love said, "but not any more.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 11, 2006
If Donald Trump were a composer, he'd probably write something like Ein Heldenleben - A Hero's Life - the colossal tone poem by Richard Strauss. It outraged some listeners back at the end of the 19th century because it seemed so boastful, so self-important, even just plain megalomaniacal, what with the 34-year-old Strauss quoting freely from his own works throughout the piece, as if he were the hero in question. The nerve. If you go The BSO performs at 8 tonight at the Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda; 3 p.m. tomorrow at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $25-$78.
NEWS
October 14, 2005
Opera opening -- Annapolis Opera will open its 2005-2006 season with Opera auf Deutsch at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 22 at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Annapolis. A celebration of German wine and food will be featured along with a selection of arias by Richard Strauss, Richard Wagner, Kurt Weill, Franz Lehar and others. Performers will include Lori Hultgren, Danielle Talamantes, Yvette Smith and Michael Gallant (at right). Tickets are $60 and must be ordered by Monday. For ticket and series subscriptions, call 410-267-8135.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | November 28, 2004
If Gustav Mahler composed the most profound farewell in all of music, through the combined expressive weight of his Ninth Symphony and Das Lied von Der Erde, Richard Strauss surely composed the most sublime, through his Four Last Songs. I don't think I could ever tire of hearing those Mahler works. Same for the Strauss, whether on records -- I've collected at least 20 versions -- or in concert. Something about these songs for soprano and orchestra draws me in, moves me every time. Technical characteristics or interpretive decisions of an individual performance may disappoint me, but never (so far)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 11, 2004
Worthy causes are bringing some high-wattage vocal artists to the area this weekend. On Friday, celebrated bass-baritone James Morris headlines a lineup of Metropolitan Opera soloists and choristers in a multiple sclerosis fund raiser; on Sunday, he'll give a recital to benefit a boys' camp. Having just finished several grueling weeks as head god Wotan in Wagner's Ring Cycle at the Met, Morris could be off fishing. Instead, he's facing back-to-back concerts. "They're good causes," he says.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | March 26, 2008
Saturday evening's concert by the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra may have been billed as a Spring Rhapsody, but if anyone came to Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts expecting pastel hues and light, frilly fare, they got disabused of those notions in a hurry. With works by Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakoff, Sergei Rachmaninoff and Richard Strauss on the bill, it was a night of big sounds and grand gestures. The program began with Rimsky's "Russian Easter Overture," a festive depiction of Russian Orthodoxy's Easter liturgy, complete with incense, icons, glowing candles, bearded priests, modal chants, fluttering angels and church bells chiming to the glory of Mother Russia's earthy, exotic celebration of the Resurrection.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 1999
"Le Sacre du Printemps" ("The Rite of Spring") is this century's "Eroica" Symphony. After its premiere in Paris in 1913, the musical universe has changed forever. Robert Spano and the Baltimore Symphony gave a very lean and vivacious account of the landmark score Thursday night. It is a great shame that they are only playing this work twice this week because this was one of the BSO's better performances.The tone was perfectly set by the opening bassoon solo played by principal bassoonist Phillip Kolker.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 17, 2001
With a split screen, it's technically possible to watch two TV shows simultaneously. If those shows were, say, I Love Lucy and Dragnet, the resulting fusion would be more or less akin to what happens in Richard Strauss' opera Ariadne auf Naxos. If you added to the mix a little Monty Python's Flying Circus and South Park, you might get something akin to Peabody Opera Theatre's engaging production of Ariadne. Except that the music wouldn't be nearly as glorious. Even played straight, the opera has plenty of zaniness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 22, 2000
Philip Glass Symphony No. 3 and other works; Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra, Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra; Dennis Russell Davies, conductor. (Nonesuch 79581) This addition to the Glass discography should delight the composer's fans and might even make a few believers out of previously minimalism-resistant folks. Minimalism has come a long way since its early days back in the 1960s, when bare-bones melodic patterns churned at great length to rock-inspired pulsations. Glass and the other two major proponents of the minimalist style, Steve Reich and John Adams, have all been expanding the genre's horizons in recent years, adding richer textures, more elaborate melodic lines.
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