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By Rob Kasper | December 10, 1997
IT HAD BEEN 14 YEARS since I'd had a "Richard Simmons experience." I had forgotten how hilarious, highly charged and theatrical the encounter would be. I was quickly reminded when I encountered Simmons, probably America's best-known exerciser, in the lobby of The Sun. He was perched atop a counter where customers were placing classied ads. Clad in gym shoes, exercise shorts and a red, sequined tank top, he was performing for all within earshot. Everybody was laughing."This place needs a piano bar," he said of the newspaper's quiet lobby.
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NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 2, 2008
Ladies and gentlemen of the jury: The roughly 40,000 of you who will visit the Hippodrome Theatre in the next two weeks will deliberate on a controversial case. You must carefully weigh the evidence and render a verdict on whether Legally Blonde: The Musical is a tasteless rip-off or a clever homage. I submit that, despite some mitigating factors to the contrary, the creative team of the stage show should be convicted of aesthetic violations. With two exceptions, the score runs the gamut of vapid to bland.
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NEWS
April 20, 2008
On April 12, 2008, RICHARD SIMMONS; loving father of Tony Simmons. He is also survived by loving sister, Dr. Dorthea Simmons, and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the family owned March Funeral Home West, Inc., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Monday after 9, where family will receive friends from 5-7. Family will also receive friends on Tuesday at 11:30, followed by funeral services at 12.
NEWS
April 20, 2008
On April 12, 2008, RICHARD SIMMONS; loving father of Tony Simmons. He is also survived by loving sister, Dr. Dorthea Simmons, and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the family owned March Funeral Home West, Inc., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Monday after 9, where family will receive friends from 5-7. Family will also receive friends on Tuesday at 11:30, followed by funeral services at 12.
FEATURES
By Patrick A. McGuire and Patrick A. McGuire,Staff Writer | September 4, 1993
Greensboro, N.C. -- In the back seat of his limo, Richard Simmons opens the window and pokes his Little Orphan Annie-esque head into traffic."I smell redeye gravy," gasps the Beverly Hills diet darling, inhaling a lungfull of Greensboro. "Yes. Pig drippings in coffee."With a look of regret he closes the window. "I know cities by their food," he sighs. "We're not in the Bible belt. It's the biscuit belt."The limo moves on, heading for the next radio station, the next TV studio, the next look-alike disc jockey or anchorman.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2002
It's not hard to find Richard Simmons in a crowd. He bounded into the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday, screaming, "I'm over heeeere!" as a crowd of devotees shrieked and surrounded the fitness/weight-loss guru, hoping for a kiss or a few cherished words of approval. Simmons, looking bronzed and remarkably fit at 54, worked his way up to the stage, lavishing praise on his fans and shimmying in an outfit nearly as loud as his greeting, with tiny striped shorts and a sea-blue, sequin-covered tank top. Disco music blasted as he began a low-impact aerobics class that was the featured event of the Healthy Living Choices Expo held there during the weekend.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 27, 2002
In Baltimore City Edison Schools advocate named to education panel David J. Stone, who helped bring the for-profit Edison Schools to Baltimore's struggling school system, will sit on the city Board of Education as a commissioner, Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced yesterday. Stone, a school partnership coordinator at Kennedy Krieger Institute, will replace Michele B. Noel on the nine-member New Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners. Noel stepped down in June after two terms. New York-based Edison Schools Inc. manages three low-performing city schools under a contract to improve test scores.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 2, 2008
Ladies and gentlemen of the jury: The roughly 40,000 of you who will visit the Hippodrome Theatre in the next two weeks will deliberate on a controversial case. You must carefully weigh the evidence and render a verdict on whether Legally Blonde: The Musical is a tasteless rip-off or a clever homage. I submit that, despite some mitigating factors to the contrary, the creative team of the stage show should be convicted of aesthetic violations. With two exceptions, the score runs the gamut of vapid to bland.
NEWS
October 29, 2007
JUDY MAZEL, 63 `Beverly Hills Diet' creator Judy Mazel, author of the 1981 best-selling book The Beverly Hills Diet, which recommended eating nothing but fruit for the first 10 days of a six-week regimen, and which drew strong criticism from medical authorities, died on Oct. 12 of stroke complications in Santa Monica, Calif. The Beverly Hills Diet made the New York Times best-seller list on May 24, 1981, and remained there for 30 weeks. It sold nearly a million copies, topping even Richard Simmons' Never-Say-Diet Book on a list heavy with nutrition and self-help books.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | September 15, 2008
Preppy, sexy and petty - that's Gossip Girl. And the prime-time teen soap opera is off to a very fast start in its second season on CW. After generating a lot of buzz, but only about 2.4 million viewers an episode in its freshman year, the glam saga of upscale teens in the upper reaches of Manhattan life has increased its audience by one-third so far, bringing in about 3.4 million viewers a week. That's a nice gain, especially when it consists primarily of women 18 to 34 years of age, one of the demographic groups that advertisers most want to reach.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2002
It's not hard to find Richard Simmons in a crowd. He bounded into the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday, screaming, "I'm over heeeere!" as a crowd of devotees shrieked and surrounded the fitness/weight-loss guru, hoping for a kiss or a few cherished words of approval. Simmons, looking bronzed and remarkably fit at 54, worked his way up to the stage, lavishing praise on his fans and shimmying in an outfit nearly as loud as his greeting, with tiny striped shorts and a sea-blue, sequin-covered tank top. Disco music blasted as he began a low-impact aerobics class that was the featured event of the Healthy Living Choices Expo held there during the weekend.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 27, 2002
In Baltimore City Edison Schools advocate named to education panel David J. Stone, who helped bring the for-profit Edison Schools to Baltimore's struggling school system, will sit on the city Board of Education as a commissioner, Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced yesterday. Stone, a school partnership coordinator at Kennedy Krieger Institute, will replace Michele B. Noel on the nine-member New Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners. Noel stepped down in June after two terms. New York-based Edison Schools Inc. manages three low-performing city schools under a contract to improve test scores.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | December 10, 1997
IT HAD BEEN 14 YEARS since I'd had a "Richard Simmons experience." I had forgotten how hilarious, highly charged and theatrical the encounter would be. I was quickly reminded when I encountered Simmons, probably America's best-known exerciser, in the lobby of The Sun. He was perched atop a counter where customers were placing classied ads. Clad in gym shoes, exercise shorts and a red, sequined tank top, he was performing for all within earshot. Everybody was laughing."This place needs a piano bar," he said of the newspaper's quiet lobby.
FEATURES
By Patrick A. McGuire and Patrick A. McGuire,Staff Writer | September 4, 1993
Greensboro, N.C. -- In the back seat of his limo, Richard Simmons opens the window and pokes his Little Orphan Annie-esque head into traffic."I smell redeye gravy," gasps the Beverly Hills diet darling, inhaling a lungfull of Greensboro. "Yes. Pig drippings in coffee."With a look of regret he closes the window. "I know cities by their food," he sighs. "We're not in the Bible belt. It's the biscuit belt."The limo moves on, heading for the next radio station, the next TV studio, the next look-alike disc jockey or anchorman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | May 23, 1999
It's amazing how easily celebrity death rumors are spread, and how difficult they can be to disprove.Just recently, The Sun got a call saying pop star Stevie Wonder had died in Baltimore. It took two reporters several hours to finally confirm that Wonder really hadn't traded his sunglasses and harmonica for angel's wings and a harp. (Things might have been sorted out faster, but his offices are on the West Coast, some three hours behind us.)So yes, Stevie lives. But thanks to the Internet, there seem to be more celebrity death rumors than ever, and having to debunk them can be a pain.
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