Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRichard Scarry
IN THE NEWS

Richard Scarry

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 3, 1994
Richard Scarry, a best-selling author and illustrator of children's books, died Saturday at Saanen hospital in Gstaad, Switzerland. He was 74 and lived in Gstaad.The cause was a heart attack, said his son, Richard Jr. of Gstaad.Mr. Scarry (the name rhymes with carry), who was born in Boston and moved to Switzerland in 1968, once wrote: "It's a preciousthing to be communicating to children, helping them discover the gift of language and thought. I'm happy to be doing it."Mr. Scarry's illustrations are noted for being crammed with details that toddlers find enthralling, especially children learning to talk.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Catherine Sudue | April 13, 2008
Anita Rozenel, a music teacher at Hernwood Elementary School, is the founder of Kids Helping Hopkins, an organization that brings Maryland students together to raise money, write cards and notes, and donate books, crafts and toys to the patients of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. Rozenel founded the organization in 1993 after one of her kindergarten pupils died of cancer. "Richard Scarry's Best First Book Ever!" / by Richard Scarry / Random House Books for Young Readers / 48 pages / $13.99 I was taking a children's literature course when I read this book.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Catherine Sudue | April 13, 2008
Anita Rozenel, a music teacher at Hernwood Elementary School, is the founder of Kids Helping Hopkins, an organization that brings Maryland students together to raise money, write cards and notes, and donate books, crafts and toys to the patients of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. Rozenel founded the organization in 1993 after one of her kindergarten pupils died of cancer. "Richard Scarry's Best First Book Ever!" / by Richard Scarry / Random House Books for Young Readers / 48 pages / $13.99 I was taking a children's literature course when I read this book.
FEATURES
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | December 8, 1999
Books from the library are fine and books borrowed from friends are important, too, but nothing is as meaningful as owning a book of your own. The holiday season is a perfect time to add to your child's growing library. A book can convey messages about growing up, help start a hobby, expand a child's world or stir the imagination. Long after they have outgrown the clothes and tired of the toys, they will still appreciate the time spent together sharing reading.To make the occasion more meaningful and lasting, consider giving a hardcover version of the book.
FEATURES
November 4, 1998
Paul Kropp, author of "Raising a Reader," lists these 15 must-have books for your young child's book shelf. Suggest them to friends and family as birthday and holiday gifts.* "Each Peach Pear Plum," by Janet and Allan Ahlberg* "Goodnight Moon," by Margarret Wise Brown* "Franklin in the Dark," by Paulette Bourgeois* "Are You My Mother?" by P.D. Eastman* "Something from Nothing," by Phoebe Gilman* "The Snowy Day," by Ezra Jack Keats* "Whose Mouse Are You?" by Robert Kraus* "Frederick," by Leo Lionni* "Fables," by Arnold Lobel* "A Boy, a Dog and a Frog," by Mercer Mayer* "Thomas' Snowsuit," by Robert Munsch* "The Best Word Book Ever," by Richard Scarry* "Where the Wild Things Are," by Maurice Sendak* "The Cat in the Hat," by Dr. Seuss* "The Polar Express," by Chris Van AllsburgPub Date: 11/04/98
FEATURES
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | December 8, 1999
Books from the library are fine and books borrowed from friends are important, too, but nothing is as meaningful as owning a book of your own. The holiday season is a perfect time to add to your child's growing library. A book can convey messages about growing up, help start a hobby, expand a child's world or stir the imagination. Long after they have outgrown the clothes and tired of the toys, they will still appreciate the time spent together sharing reading.To make the occasion more meaningful and lasting, consider giving a hardcover version of the book.
FEATURES
By David Mehegan and David Mehegan,Boston Globe | May 5, 1994
Children's author and illustrator Richard Scarry, who died last Saturday in Switzerland, was a writer who had a direct wire to children's hearts, the disdain of serious critics notwithstanding.Scarry's more than 200 books have great variety -- counting and alphabet primers, first readers, books about good manners, madcap celebrations of daily life. But a few things are constant in them, things every child looks forward to: a merry outlook on life, busy and detailed drawings, brisk stories and an abundance of interesting information about real-world places or things.
NEWS
August 16, 1998
The Maryland Science Center is featuring readings of Richard Scarry stories Thursday and Aug. 27 in conjunction with its Busytown exhibit, a three-dimensional, hands-on model of the places and characters in Scarry's books.Media personalities will read aloud from Scarry's many works, with each session lasting about one hour. Lori Pinson of WBFF-TV (Channel 45) is scheduled to read at 3 p.m. Thursday, and Jo Jo Gerard and Kenny Campbell of WWMX-FM (106.5) are to read at 11 a.m. Aug. 27.For information on the Busytown exhibit, which continues through Sept.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 7, 1995
The Newt-man is everywhere! That's House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), of course, who will address the citizenry tonight -- although not live on all networks. He infiltrates several other programs, and in late-night seems a likely target for tart-tongued Dennis Miller.* "Newt Gingrich: Address to the Nation" (8 p.m.- 9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13; cable CNBC, CNN, C-SPAN) -- In a twist on the administration tradition, the House speaker will offer his assessment of the first 100 days of the GOP Congress.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | August 6, 1998
Maritime historyCelebrate Maryland's maritime heritage tomorrow and Saturday with exhibits, demonstrations, boat tours and entertainment at the U.S. Naval Academy's "Maritime Maryland" event.Outside, visitors can tour and cruise on a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, the Nathan of Dorchester, a 45-foot sailing oyster boat, and explore a 22-foot three-log canoe, the Marianne, built around 1916.Inside, visitors can peruse exhibits from the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum and the National Aquarium in Baltimore.
FEATURES
November 4, 1998
Paul Kropp, author of "Raising a Reader," lists these 15 must-have books for your young child's book shelf. Suggest them to friends and family as birthday and holiday gifts.* "Each Peach Pear Plum," by Janet and Allan Ahlberg* "Goodnight Moon," by Margarret Wise Brown* "Franklin in the Dark," by Paulette Bourgeois* "Are You My Mother?" by P.D. Eastman* "Something from Nothing," by Phoebe Gilman* "The Snowy Day," by Ezra Jack Keats* "Whose Mouse Are You?" by Robert Kraus* "Frederick," by Leo Lionni* "Fables," by Arnold Lobel* "A Boy, a Dog and a Frog," by Mercer Mayer* "Thomas' Snowsuit," by Robert Munsch* "The Best Word Book Ever," by Richard Scarry* "Where the Wild Things Are," by Maurice Sendak* "The Cat in the Hat," by Dr. Seuss* "The Polar Express," by Chris Van AllsburgPub Date: 11/04/98
FEATURES
By David Mehegan and David Mehegan,Boston Globe | May 5, 1994
Children's author and illustrator Richard Scarry, who died last Saturday in Switzerland, was a writer who had a direct wire to children's hearts, the disdain of serious critics notwithstanding.Scarry's more than 200 books have great variety -- counting and alphabet primers, first readers, books about good manners, madcap celebrations of daily life. But a few things are constant in them, things every child looks forward to: a merry outlook on life, busy and detailed drawings, brisk stories and an abundance of interesting information about real-world places or things.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 3, 1994
Richard Scarry, a best-selling author and illustrator of children's books, died Saturday at Saanen hospital in Gstaad, Switzerland. He was 74 and lived in Gstaad.The cause was a heart attack, said his son, Richard Jr. of Gstaad.Mr. Scarry (the name rhymes with carry), who was born in Boston and moved to Switzerland in 1968, once wrote: "It's a preciousthing to be communicating to children, helping them discover the gift of language and thought. I'm happy to be doing it."Mr. Scarry's illustrations are noted for being crammed with details that toddlers find enthralling, especially children learning to talk.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | April 26, 1998
Mission: To nurture an awareness of the importance of science and stimulate people of all ages, especially children, to appreciate science and its impact, by creating educational experiences that emphasize the visual and tactile.Latest accomplishment: Bringing higher-profile exhibits such as "Star Trek" and the current "Racecar: The Science of Speed" to the center; more frequent turnover in exhibits and IMAX films.On the horizon: The long-awaited, most successful IMAX film to date, "Everest," opens May 22, taking visitors on a climb to the mountain's 29,028-foot, breathtaking summit.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
Electronic readers will make their debut this week at Anne Arundel County public libraries, when 200 e-readers become available for patrons to take home. E-reader technology allows a user to have hundreds of hours of reading materials on a portable, lightweight gadget that can slip into a purse, backpack or briefcase. A user can adjust the type size, sidestepping the question of whether a book is available in large print. "We are in the business of books and reading, and this is simply a different format.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.