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By Richard M. Sudhalter and Richard M. Sudhalter,Special to the sun | May 17, 1998
"Richard Rodgers," William G. Hyland. Illustrated. Yale University Press. 337 pages. $30.From most reliable accounts, Richard Rodgers was a hard man to know and often an even harder one to like. For every colleague who praised his charm, wit and dedication, there seemed as many who remembered him as an aloof, detached, even cold presence.Lyricist Alan Jay Lerner, who once attempted a collaboration with Rodgers, opined that the composer was "only really happy making contracts, haggling about royalties, salaries and theatrical leases."
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 11, 2002
When it comes to Rodgers and Hammerstein, audiences may be more apt to think of "raindrops on roses" than race relations. But the theme of race resonates through many of Rodgers and Hammerstein's best-loved shows -- The King and I, Flower Drum Song and, most prominently, South Pacific. Winner of the 1950 Pulitzer Prize, South Pacific is experiencing a resurgence of interest. In addition to the 2001 TV movie starring Glenn Close, there's a new British revival directed by Trevor Nunn as well as an American touring production, which opens a one-week run at the Mechanic Theatre tomorrow.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 21, 1996
"Carousel" - a musical about the circularity of life has come full circle itself.Based on a 1909 European play, "Liliom" by Ferenc Molnar, it was musicalized and thoroughly Americanized in 1945 by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, who transported it from its Hungarian setting to the Maine coast.Now, the Europeans have made it their own again, as proved by the Royal National Theatre of Great Britain's splendid Tony Award-winning production at the Lyric Opera House through Sunday.The visual elements are the core of this beautifully realized revival.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard M. Sudhalter and By Richard M. Sudhalter,Special to the Sun | December 30, 2001
Somewhere for Me: A Biography of Richard Rodgers, by Meryle Secrest. Alfred A. Knopf. 453 pages. $30. Readers tackling Meryle Secrest's new Richard Rodgers biography soon collide with an alarming realization: this author neither knows, nor much cares, about her subject's music. Written to coincide with next year's centenary of the composer's birth, Somewhere for Me is upfront about its intentions: "In the end what interests me is a subject's secret life," says author Secrest; "his struggles, his dreams, disappointments, loves and hates.
NEWS
February 15, 1993
NEXT month marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark show "Oklahoma!" -- the 1943 production by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II that transformed musical theater. It ran on Broadway for over five years and a touring company performed the show around the country for nine years. Music professor Walter Frisch wrote in the winter issue of "Columbia" magazine about the inception of the show:"From the beginning, Rodgers and Hammerstein worked with each other in a way different than either had done with previous collaborators.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | June 23, 1993
Most people remember "I Remember Mama" as a play (by John Van Druten), or as a movie (starring Irene Dunne), or as a radio series, or as one of the first TV sitcoms, or as the book on which all of these were based ("Mama's Bank Account," by Kathryn Forbes). But hardly anyone remembers that for a few months in 1979, "I Remember Mama" was a Broadway musical. It was, in fact, composer Richard Rodgers' last musical.This alone makes the little-known show worth a look and a listen, and Cockpit in Court, a summer theater with a reputation for the tried-and-true, deserves high marks for taking a risk on an unfamiliar commodity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard M. Sudhalter and By Richard M. Sudhalter,Special to the Sun | December 30, 2001
Somewhere for Me: A Biography of Richard Rodgers, by Meryle Secrest. Alfred A. Knopf. 453 pages. $30. Readers tackling Meryle Secrest's new Richard Rodgers biography soon collide with an alarming realization: this author neither knows, nor much cares, about her subject's music. Written to coincide with next year's centenary of the composer's birth, Somewhere for Me is upfront about its intentions: "In the end what interests me is a subject's secret life," says author Secrest; "his struggles, his dreams, disappointments, loves and hates.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing theater critic | May 1, 1991
Everyone involved in "Two By Two" at The Havilah-Hayes Dinner Theatre is to be congratulated for producing a delightful evening of theater against enormous odds.The enormous odds, that is, posed by Richard Rodgers and Martin Charnin, who provided the music, lyrics and book for this charming but shallow musical comedy.Originally successful in New York as a vehicle for Danny Kaye, the play tells the biblical story of Noah, his wife and family, the animals, the Flood and all the other details with a few newly invented ones to spice up the plot.
NEWS
March 30, 2001
Concert will celebrate 20th-century composers Chamber Music on the Hill will honor composers born near the start of the 20th century at 7 p.m. Sunday in McDaniel Lounge at Western Maryland College. Part of a series at the college, the concert will feature WMC performers David Duree, Kyle Engler, Linda Kirkpatrick and David Kreider; Julie Gregorian, Esther Mellon-Thompson and Melissa Zaraya, all of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; Evan Walker of Carroll Community College; and area professional musicians Lynn Griffith and Mindy Niles.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 11, 2002
When it comes to Rodgers and Hammerstein, audiences may be more apt to think of "raindrops on roses" than race relations. But the theme of race resonates through many of Rodgers and Hammerstein's best-loved shows -- The King and I, Flower Drum Song and, most prominently, South Pacific. Winner of the 1950 Pulitzer Prize, South Pacific is experiencing a resurgence of interest. In addition to the 2001 TV movie starring Glenn Close, there's a new British revival directed by Trevor Nunn as well as an American touring production, which opens a one-week run at the Mechanic Theatre tomorrow.
NEWS
March 30, 2001
Concert will celebrate 20th-century composers Chamber Music on the Hill will honor composers born near the start of the 20th century at 7 p.m. Sunday in McDaniel Lounge at Western Maryland College. Part of a series at the college, the concert will feature WMC performers David Duree, Kyle Engler, Linda Kirkpatrick and David Kreider; Julie Gregorian, Esther Mellon-Thompson and Melissa Zaraya, all of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; Evan Walker of Carroll Community College; and area professional musicians Lynn Griffith and Mindy Niles.
FEATURES
By Richard M. Sudhalter and Richard M. Sudhalter,Special to the sun | May 17, 1998
"Richard Rodgers," William G. Hyland. Illustrated. Yale University Press. 337 pages. $30.From most reliable accounts, Richard Rodgers was a hard man to know and often an even harder one to like. For every colleague who praised his charm, wit and dedication, there seemed as many who remembered him as an aloof, detached, even cold presence.Lyricist Alan Jay Lerner, who once attempted a collaboration with Rodgers, opined that the composer was "only really happy making contracts, haggling about royalties, salaries and theatrical leases."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 21, 1996
"Carousel" - a musical about the circularity of life has come full circle itself.Based on a 1909 European play, "Liliom" by Ferenc Molnar, it was musicalized and thoroughly Americanized in 1945 by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, who transported it from its Hungarian setting to the Maine coast.Now, the Europeans have made it their own again, as proved by the Royal National Theatre of Great Britain's splendid Tony Award-winning production at the Lyric Opera House through Sunday.The visual elements are the core of this beautifully realized revival.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | June 23, 1993
Most people remember "I Remember Mama" as a play (by John Van Druten), or as a movie (starring Irene Dunne), or as a radio series, or as one of the first TV sitcoms, or as the book on which all of these were based ("Mama's Bank Account," by Kathryn Forbes). But hardly anyone remembers that for a few months in 1979, "I Remember Mama" was a Broadway musical. It was, in fact, composer Richard Rodgers' last musical.This alone makes the little-known show worth a look and a listen, and Cockpit in Court, a summer theater with a reputation for the tried-and-true, deserves high marks for taking a risk on an unfamiliar commodity.
NEWS
February 15, 1993
NEXT month marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark show "Oklahoma!" -- the 1943 production by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II that transformed musical theater. It ran on Broadway for over five years and a touring company performed the show around the country for nine years. Music professor Walter Frisch wrote in the winter issue of "Columbia" magazine about the inception of the show:"From the beginning, Rodgers and Hammerstein worked with each other in a way different than either had done with previous collaborators.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing theater critic | May 1, 1991
Everyone involved in "Two By Two" at The Havilah-Hayes Dinner Theatre is to be congratulated for producing a delightful evening of theater against enormous odds.The enormous odds, that is, posed by Richard Rodgers and Martin Charnin, who provided the music, lyrics and book for this charming but shallow musical comedy.Originally successful in New York as a vehicle for Danny Kaye, the play tells the biblical story of Noah, his wife and family, the animals, the Flood and all the other details with a few newly invented ones to spice up the plot.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | December 14, 2006
William Shakespeare wrote plays for the masses. So if he were alive today, chances are he'd be writing Broadway musicals. Composer Richard Rodgers, lyricist Lorenz Hart and playwright/director George Abbott blazed the way in 1938 with the first Broadway musical based on a Shakespeare play. Abbott adapted the script for The Boys from Syracuse from Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors, and Rodgers and Hart filled it with such gems as "Falling in Love With Love" and "This Can't Be Love." The Boys from Syracuse runs through Jan. 14 at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St. $10-$65.
NEWS
June 7, 2005
On June 5, 2005, BESSIE G.(nee Adkins), beloved wife of the late Frank Baskette, devoted mother of James Baskette and his wife Ruth, dear sister of Paul Adkins and Virginia Nasteff, sister-in-law of Pat Mc Gehee, dear grandmother of Sharon Rodgers, Tena Baskette, Mark Mc Gehee and the late James Baskette, Jr. Also survived by grandson-in-law Richard Rodgers, six great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandson Jacob. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Road on Tuesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9. Funeral services will be held on Wednesday 12 noon.
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