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Richard Ravitch

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SPORTS
November 20, 1991
Phillies president Bill Giles said yesterday that he thinks Philadelphia has a 50-50 chance of signing free-agent Bobby Bonilla.Giles and general manager Lee Thomas courted Bonilla and agent Dennis Gilbert for five hours Saturday. They toured the area to show off housing and schools, stopped by Lenny Dykstra's home and spoke on the telephone with manager Jim Fregosi."He liked the city, liked Lee, liked Fregosi, liked the ballclub," Giles said. "If the money is equal, I think we have a 50-50 chance of getting him."
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1997
It was about this time five years ago that baseball owners began their crusade for something called "cost certainty." Labor negotiator Richard Ravitch -- at the behest of influential owners Bud Selig, Jerry Reinsdorf and John Harrington -- spearheaded a drive to convince the Major League Baseball Players Association that the future of the industry depended on the ability of management to determine in advance the cost of doing business.The union did not bite, of course, and what followed was the worst in a series of collective bargaining nightmares that has diminished the stature of baseball in American society and allowed each of the other major professional sports to grab a bigger piece of the sports entertainment pie.Would baseball be better off now if the players union had accepted a salary cap?
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SPORTS
October 5, 1991
Shawon Dunston, who could have filed for free agency after the season, decided to remain with the Chicago Cubs and agreed yesterday to a $12 million, four-year contract.The 28-year-old infielder is batting .260 with 12 home runs, 50 RBI and 21 stolen bases. He hit .262 with 17 homers and 66 RBI last year.Dunston, who is making $2.1 million this season, gets a $1.5 million signing bonus, $2.1 million next season, $3.1 million in 1993, $2 million in 1994 and $3.3 million in 1995.Meanwhile, Jim Essian conceded yesterday that his chances of coming back to manage the club next year are not good.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | November 14, 1994
Reading time: Two minutesThe first moment anyone laid eyes on "Skeeter," they knew they were in the presence of a star. It was 1959 at the Pan-American Games in Chicago when Wilma Rudolph arrived. "And people who knew her even a little bit will never forget her," said 1960 Rome Olympics teammate Al Cantello when word arrived Wilma had died of brain cancer over the weekend."All Italy, and that includes all the Olympic athletes, fell in love with her. The nickname 'La Gazelle' appeared all over the newspapers and television every day," Navy's track and cross country coach continued.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1994
NEW YORK -- The Orioles return to Camden Yards tonight to face the Boston Red Sox, but it figures to be a short homestand.The strike deadline set by the Major League Baseball Players Association passes after the completion of today's games, and there appears to be no hope of a quick end to baseball's labor dispute.Union and owner representatives met for two hours yesterday at the Intercontinental Hotel, hoping that something would change the chemistry of the frozen collective bargaining negotiations, but baseball appears doomed to begin its eighth work stoppage in 23 seasons tomorrow.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | November 14, 1994
Reading time: Two minutesThe first moment anyone laid eyes on "Skeeter," they knew they were in the presence of a star. It was 1959 at the Pan-American Games in Chicago when Wilma Rudolph arrived. "And people who knew her even a little bit will never forget her," said 1960 Rome Olympics teammate Al Cantello when word arrived Wilma had died of brain cancer over the weekend."All Italy, and that includes all the Olympic athletes, fell in love with her. The nickname 'La Gazelle' appeared all over the newspapers and television every day," Navy's track and cross country coach continued.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1997
It was about this time five years ago that baseball owners began their crusade for something called "cost certainty." Labor negotiator Richard Ravitch -- at the behest of influential owners Bud Selig, Jerry Reinsdorf and John Harrington -- spearheaded a drive to convince the Major League Baseball Players Association that the future of the industry depended on the ability of management to determine in advance the cost of doing business.The union did not bite, of course, and what followed was the worst in a series of collective bargaining nightmares that has diminished the stature of baseball in American society and allowed each of the other major professional sports to grab a bigger piece of the sports entertainment pie.Would baseball be better off now if the players union had accepted a salary cap?
NEWS
August 9, 1994
Negotiations resumed yesterday between representatives of the baseball players and owners, but no movement occurred.In fact, with three days left before Friday's strike deadline, the two sides didn't even address the sticking point in the talks -- the owners' proposal to institute a salary cap."No progress was made on the critical economic issue," owners negotiator Richard Ravitch said.Meanwhile, the Orioles must consider their progress. And if there is a strike, columnist Ken Rosenthal says, the Orioles should have a new manager whenever play resumes.
SPORTS
August 27, 1994
News of the dayBoth sides said they didn't have any contact with each other yesterday. They also didn't speak with federal mediators.But owners negotiator Richard Ravitch indicated that the talks could resume as soon as Monday.Management discounted a report by ESPN that said large-market clubs, in a desperate situation, might break away and form their own league.Games lostFourteen games were canceled yesterday. The total number missed is 195. Only 474 games remain on the schedule.Quote"I'll be honest.
SPORTS
August 29, 2002
Days to strike deadline: 1 Today's schedule: Both sides will be in their offices, with multiple bargaining sessions anticipated. Yesterday's highlights: Commissioner Bud Selig traveled from Milwaukee to New York. The sides held two bargaining sessions. Quote of the day: "I still think we're going to get something done. I just think we're all too close on too much of this to let it fall apart." - Atlanta's Tom Glavine, the NL player representative This date in baseball labor history: "I think the owners want to do everything humanly possible to save the postseason.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1994
NEW YORK -- The Orioles return to Camden Yards tonight to face the Boston Red Sox, but it figures to be a short homestand.The strike deadline set by the Major League Baseball Players Association passes after the completion of today's games, and there appears to be no hope of a quick end to baseball's labor dispute.Union and owner representatives met for two hours yesterday at the Intercontinental Hotel, hoping that something would change the chemistry of the frozen collective bargaining negotiations, but baseball appears doomed to begin its eighth work stoppage in 23 seasons tomorrow.
SPORTS
November 20, 1991
Phillies president Bill Giles said yesterday that he thinks Philadelphia has a 50-50 chance of signing free-agent Bobby Bonilla.Giles and general manager Lee Thomas courted Bonilla and agent Dennis Gilbert for five hours Saturday. They toured the area to show off housing and schools, stopped by Lenny Dykstra's home and spoke on the telephone with manager Jim Fregosi."He liked the city, liked Lee, liked Fregosi, liked the ballclub," Giles said. "If the money is equal, I think we have a 50-50 chance of getting him."
SPORTS
October 5, 1991
Shawon Dunston, who could have filed for free agency after the season, decided to remain with the Chicago Cubs and agreed yesterday to a $12 million, four-year contract.The 28-year-old infielder is batting .260 with 12 home runs, 50 RBI and 21 stolen bases. He hit .262 with 17 homers and 66 RBI last year.Dunston, who is making $2.1 million this season, gets a $1.5 million signing bonus, $2.1 million next season, $3.1 million in 1993, $2 million in 1994 and $3.3 million in 1995.Meanwhile, Jim Essian conceded yesterday that his chances of coming back to manage the club next year are not good.
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