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By M. Dion Thompson | May 28, 1995
"Pryor Convictions: And Other Life Sentences," by Richard Pryor with Todd Gold. 257 pages. New York: Pantheon Books. $23Richard Pryor looks out from the cover of this sad, honest autobiography with a distant, pained stare, eyes just this side of tears. His expression says: I have seen and done things you wouldn't believe, and a lot of it hurt.He's made the de rigueur trip to the Betty Ford Clinic. Had multiple nervous breakdowns, a quadruple bypass, six wives. Shot his Mercedes and set himself on fire.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 5, 2014
Comedian Joan Rivers once talked about how she came of age in the mid 1960s with Richard Pryor, Bill Cosby, Woody Allen and George Carlin in comedy clubs in Greenwich Village, where Johnny Carson's people would troll for new talent. She recalled that she was the last of the group to make it to "The Tonight Show," the last of the pack "allowed" to break through. "When I started out, a pretty girl did not go into comedy," she said. "I never was one of the guys, I was never asked to go hang out. "Looking back, I think it was because I was a woman, I was the very last one of the group they put on the Carson show.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | July 30, 1991
You don't need "Another You," the latest Gene Wilder-Richard Pryor vehicle to self-destruct before take-off. This movie brings new meaning to the word meaninglessness: It is simultaneously predictable and improbable.Wilder plays George Washington, a pathological liar who's just been released from a mental institution in an Abe Lincoln stovepipe hat that signifies his hard-won honesty. Pryor plays Eddie Dash, a small-time con man on parole whose assigned community service duty is to help George adjust to non-institutional life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dustin Levy | June 11, 2013
Known for his spot-on impressions of President Obama, Eddie Murphy, Denzel Washington and many others, cast member Jay Pharoah prepares for his first stand-up performance in Baltimore at the Baltimore Comedy Factory from Friday through Sunday. We spoke with Pharoah about discovering his knack for impressions, meeting Obama and previewing the next season of "SNL. " What are you looking forward to about performing here? Any time I can get on the stage and just show the world, that's the way to do it. I'm just excited about people coming out. I'm excited about another market seeing the talent.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Mr. Thompson is a reporter for The Sun | August 25, 1991
IF I STOP I'LL DIE:THE COMEDY AND TRAGEDYOF RICHARD PRYOR.John A. Williamsand Dennis A. Williams.Thunder's Mouth Press.234 pages. $19.95.THE ADVENTURES OF AMOS 'N'ANDY: A SOCIAL HISTORY OFAN AMERICAN PHENOMENONMelvin Patrick Ely.The Free Press.322 pages. $22.95. "We seldom appear in the media as who we say we are, rather, as who whites say we are."That statement, attributed to actress Ellen Holly, is from the biography of Richard Pryor, but it serves well as a commentary on "Amos 'N' Andy."
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
Richard Pryor, who revolutionized American comedy by tapping into his experiences as a black man in a white-dominated society, died of heart failure early yesterday at his home in Encino, Calif., just nine days after his 65th birthday. He had been ill for years, having been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a degenerative disease of the nervous system, in 1986. There were comedians who came of age in the 1970s. And there was Mr. Pryor. Scathingly funny, bitterly angry, utterly fearless, Mr. Pryor, whom his friend Robin Williams once called "the Evel Knievel of comedy," answered to no comedic standard but his own. He became not only a trailblazer, expanding the boundaries of American humor by holding no cow sacred, but also - in a twist that amazed him endlessly - one of the best-loved comics of his time.
FEATURES
By Murry Frymer and Murry Frymer,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 30, 1992
Comic Roxanne Reese is on stage at Los Angeles' Comedy Store, finishing her act. "And now," she says, "a real big welcome for a man who's too legit to quit."A big welcome it is. The audience stands, claps and cheers. And then, in the corner, he enters: Richard Pryor, the angry, profanity-spewing comic who started it all for angry black comedians.It's a really big welcome for a man who now looks very little, walking onto the stage, holding the arm of his assistant. There is a dazed little grin on his face.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | November 13, 2006
Rain Pryor says that when her father, Richard, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, the legendary comedian and actor saw the disease as another trial in a life that seemed tormented from birth. She says he insisted MS stood for "more stuff," then she flashed a wily grin and admitted that "stuff" was a euphemism for a four-letter cuss word her dad was known for using. Rain Pryor , author of Jokes My Father Never Taught Me: Life, Love and Loss With Richard Pryor, will read from her book at Security Square Mall Center Court, 6901 Security Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
The first time Rain Pryor visited the intimate Strand Theater, she knew she was in the right place. "I thought, 'It smells like theater. I'm home,'" says the actress, comedian, writer and musician who has just been named artistic director of the Strand. This 55-seat venue, part of the artistically bustling Station North district, was founded in 2008 by Jayme Kilburn to showcase women - performers, directors, writers, designers. Pryor, who relocated to Baltimore from Los Angeles about five years ago, only recently became acquainted with the theater, but she seems thoroughly comfortable there already.
FEATURES
By Beth Hannan | June 9, 1993
The Richard Pryor concert scheduled for Thursday at Pier 6 Concert Pavilion has been canceled.Tickets should be returned to place of purchase by July 18 for a refund. Tickets bought through Telecharge may be returned to: Pier 6 Concert Pavilion, Attn: Box Office, 731 Eastern Ave., Baltimore, 21202.8, For more information call (410) 625-1400.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
The first time Rain Pryor visited the intimate Strand Theater, she knew she was in the right place. "I thought, 'It smells like theater. I'm home,'" says the actress, comedian, writer and musician who has just been named artistic director of the Strand. This 55-seat venue, part of the artistically bustling Station North district, was founded in 2008 by Jayme Kilburn to showcase women - performers, directors, writers, designers. Pryor, who relocated to Baltimore from Los Angeles about five years ago, only recently became acquainted with the theater, but she seems thoroughly comfortable there already.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2011
Federal Hill art gallery owner Mark Cottman never forgot the night he saw comedian Richard Pryor perform at the old Civic Center. So when he heard that Pryor's daughter, Rain, was living in Baltimore and teaching at a city junior-senior high school arts academy, Cottman decided he wanted to help her students in their efforts to stage a production of playwright August Wilson's "Gem of the Ocean. " "Her father inspired me," said Cottman last week as he stood in a classroom at West Baltimore's ConneXions Academy of Art, where Rain Pryor chairs the drama department.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | October 13, 2008
Dear Chris Rock: I apologize in advance for the language that will shortly follow. And yes, there is a certain irony there, given that you are one of the most profane men on the planet. Also one of the funniest. That's why I eagerly anticipated your new HBO special, Kill the Messenger, even though I knew there would inevitably come a moment that made me embarrassed for you. And sure enough, it came. During your routine, you noted how, last year, the NAACP held a symbolic "burial" of the N-word.
NEWS
November 13, 2006
MARYLAND Building of bay islands planned The Maryland Port Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are proposing to spend more than $1 billion to rebuild two islands in the Chesapeake Bay - the government's latest plan to use dredge spoil from shipping channels to enhance the environment. pg 1A State to certify principals The state education department is set to announce today that it will award full principal certification to graduates of a yearlong New Leaders for New Schools program designed to train new principals for Baltimore city schools.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | November 13, 2006
Rain Pryor says that when her father, Richard, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, the legendary comedian and actor saw the disease as another trial in a life that seemed tormented from birth. She says he insisted MS stood for "more stuff," then she flashed a wily grin and admitted that "stuff" was a euphemism for a four-letter cuss word her dad was known for using. Rain Pryor , author of Jokes My Father Never Taught Me: Life, Love and Loss With Richard Pryor, will read from her book at Security Square Mall Center Court, 6901 Security Blvd.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | July 30, 2006
THE AL QAEDA FILES -- PBS Home Video / $34.95 PBS' remarkable Frontline series long has been one of the surest bets on television. At a time when network news divisions are constantly being downsized and the line between entertainment and journalism is becoming more and more blurred, Frontline has continued soberly reporting the news, taking the time and making the effort to tell the whole story, completely and dispassionately. The Al Qaeda Files collects seven programs that ran between March 2000 and January 2005, all of which focus on America's war on terror and its main target, Osama bin Laden, the 17th of 52 children of a Saudi businessman who had made millions in construction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2005
The golden era of comedy albums -- the late 1950s and 1960s -- began with comics such as Shelly Berman and Lenny Bruce. The classic "2000-Year-Old Man" routine from Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks made its debut on vinyl in 1960, as did recordings from the comedy team of Elaine May and Mike Nichols. Bob Newhart had back-to-back No. 1 comedy albums in the early 1960s, but it was a presidential impersonator who set a sales record. The First Family (1962) featured the late Vaughn Meader's indelible impersonation of President Kennedy.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | October 13, 2008
Dear Chris Rock: I apologize in advance for the language that will shortly follow. And yes, there is a certain irony there, given that you are one of the most profane men on the planet. Also one of the funniest. That's why I eagerly anticipated your new HBO special, Kill the Messenger, even though I knew there would inevitably come a moment that made me embarrassed for you. And sure enough, it came. During your routine, you noted how, last year, the NAACP held a symbolic "burial" of the N-word.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TERRY ARMOUR and TERRY ARMOUR,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 9, 2006
Rain Pryor brings her autobiographical one-woman show, Fried Chicken & Latkes, to the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts tomorrow night at 8. She recently chatted about the cabaret-style show, a series of monologues and songs chronicling life growing up in Beverly Hills, Calif., as the child of a black father (late comedian Richard Pryor) and a Jewish mother. Pryor also spoke candidly about how her father's recent death affected her. Fried Chicken & Latkes is about growing up biracial.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | December 16, 2005
WASHINGTON -- If there is anything that Richard Pryor and Eugene McCarthy had in common besides their sadly coincidental deaths on the same day last weekend, it is this: Both men understood the value of humor as a sweetener of persuasion. Both men were amusing mavericks who reshaped our political and social landscape in a time of turbulent change. Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III, who was 65, reinvented standup comedy in the 1970s with a gumbo mixture of Dick Gregory's political edge, Bill Cosby's folksiness and Lenny Bruce's profanity-laced social commentary.
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