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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 17, 2006
Not since Graham Greene has a critically acclaimed novelist been as closely linked to the big screen as Richard Price. His screenwriting credits include Martin Scorsese's The Color of Money (1986) and the Al Pacino-Ellen Barkin thriller, Sea of Love (1989). The movie version of his 1998 novel Freedomland opens today, starring Julianne Moore and Samuel L. Jackson. Price penned the script. He's still best known for his first book, The Wanderers (1974), a series of linked stories about Bronx teen gangs that Philip Kaufman (The Right Stuff)
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By Rebecca Oppenheimer | August 23, 2011
During one's school days, summer vacation offers the opportunity for reinvention. Who hasn't fantasized about returning in the fall triumphantly sporting a new look, a new skill, a new attitude? If you don't have three months off for that makeover, try one of these three books on for size. Each features an individual seeking his or her place in the world. "The Breaks" by Richard Price Picador, $16 "The Breaks" may surprise fans of Richard Price's work on "The Wire" and of his gritty recent novels.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 20, 1992
About halfway through "Basic Instinct" I was seized with a primordial urge, a spasm of undeniable wanting that arose from deep within my being. I fought it, but what can a man do in the grip of such a demon? And so I gave in and . . . ZZZZZZ-ZZZZZZZZZ-ZZZZZZZZ!Overpublicized and underbrained,"Basic Instinct" is a bitter disappointment, worth maybe a 10th of the hype that the media have so obligingly ladled out for its benefit. It makes you feel dirty in the morning. A thin and unconvincing mystery story, it is really driven forward not by plot or character but by the two or three quasi-hot scenes in which highly paid movie stars cavort like Erica and Long Dong in any of a half-million craftless tapes since porn moved to video.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 17, 2006
Not since Graham Greene has a critically acclaimed novelist been as closely linked to the big screen as Richard Price. His screenwriting credits include Martin Scorsese's The Color of Money (1986) and the Al Pacino-Ellen Barkin thriller, Sea of Love (1989). The movie version of his 1998 novel Freedomland opens today, starring Julianne Moore and Samuel L. Jackson. Price penned the script. He's still best known for his first book, The Wanderers (1974), a series of linked stories about Bronx teen gangs that Philip Kaufman (The Right Stuff)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 20, 1992
About halfway through "Basic Instinct" I was seized with a primordial urge,a spasm of undeniable wanting that arose from deep within my being. I fought it, but what can a man do in the grip of such a demon? And so I gave in and . . . ZZZZZZ-ZZZZZZZZZ!Overpublicized and underbrained,"Basic Instinct" is a bitter disappointment, worth maybe a 10th of the hype that the media have so obligingly ladled out for its benefit. It makes you feel dirty in the morning. A thin and unconvincing mystery story, it is really driven forward not by plot or character but by the two or three quasi-hot scenes in which highly paid movie stars cavort like Erica and Long Dong in any of a half-million craftless tapes since porn moved to video.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | April 18, 1991
In 1984, "Saturday Night Live" alumnus Bill Murray got savaged by critics for attempting a serious dramatic role in the remake of the 1946 Tyrone Power classic "The Razor's Edge" and has stuck with comedy ever since. But he may be heading into treacherous critical waters again.Sources close to Murray say his next film project may be "Mad Dogs and Glory," in which he would co-star with really serious actor Robert De Niro. The script, by Richard Price ("The Color of Money"), is the story of a thug loan shark (the role Murray would play)
EXPLORE
By Rebecca Oppenheimer | August 23, 2011
During one's school days, summer vacation offers the opportunity for reinvention. Who hasn't fantasized about returning in the fall triumphantly sporting a new look, a new skill, a new attitude? If you don't have three months off for that makeover, try one of these three books on for size. Each features an individual seeking his or her place in the world. "The Breaks" by Richard Price Picador, $16 "The Breaks" may surprise fans of Richard Price's work on "The Wire" and of his gritty recent novels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Asher and By James Asher,Special to the Sun | January 26, 2003
Samaritan, by Richard Price. Knopf. 400 pages. $25. Samaritan is good. Very good. Pick it up, and you won't be putting it down. This book reinforces my bias that novelists had better be good writers. Richard Price is and he had me hooked to the end. Set in post-World-Trade-Center-New Jersey, Samaritan is about "good deeds" done by the well intentioned and how, too often, they go astray. Ray Mitchell, a ghetto escapee who also overcame a go-round with drugs, returns to his old neighborhood with a fat bank account and a mission to do some good in his part of this rotten, messed-up world.
NEWS
By Brian E. Crowley and Brian E. Crowley,Cox News Service | June 14, 1992
CLOCKERS.Richard Price.Houghton Mifflin.599 pages; $22.95. Strike Durham is a cocaine dealer. Not the flashy, witty drug dealer of "Miami Vice" -- Strike leads a crew of teen-age, $10-bottle sellers in the New Jersey projects across the river from Manhattan.At 19, Strike is a veteran of the streets. His tough-guy image keeps him alive. His bleeding ulcer is the result of turmoil, conflict and fear. Strike, it turns out, is more than just a dope-dealing thug. In many ways, despite the scars, he is still just a struggling kid who often wonders if there is a way out."
FEATURES
By Melvin Jules Bukiet and Melvin Jules Bukiet,Special to the sun | May 17, 1998
"Freedomland," by Richard Price. Broadway Books. 512 pages. $25.Ripped from today's headlines!" That's how the hot quote for some book that presumably echoes the latest dirt in the daily press is supposed to read. And usually, you'd just as soon rip out such a book's pages for the bottom of the parakeet cage. But Richard Price has indeed taken one of the most gruesome tabloid stories of the '90s and turned it into a smart and serious vehicle that, for the most part, rips along throughout his sixth novel, "Freedomland.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | June 9, 2004
Mike Sabo is waiting for his heart to arrive. It is due any minute from Los Angeles. Just before lunch, an assistant hands him a small brown box. Sabo slashes through the packing tape and reverently unwraps the organ. It's a beaut: crimson with purple overtones, made of gelatin, and, on this sweltering day, cool and faintly moist to the touch. Sabo studies the heart with satisfaction. It will play a starring role in the autopsy scene of the HBO television show The Wire, which is scheduled to be shot later this May afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Asher and By James Asher,Special to the Sun | January 26, 2003
Samaritan, by Richard Price. Knopf. 400 pages. $25. Samaritan is good. Very good. Pick it up, and you won't be putting it down. This book reinforces my bias that novelists had better be good writers. Richard Price is and he had me hooked to the end. Set in post-World-Trade-Center-New Jersey, Samaritan is about "good deeds" done by the well intentioned and how, too often, they go astray. Ray Mitchell, a ghetto escapee who also overcame a go-round with drugs, returns to his old neighborhood with a fat bank account and a mission to do some good in his part of this rotten, messed-up world.
FEATURES
By Melvin Jules Bukiet and Melvin Jules Bukiet,Special to the sun | May 17, 1998
"Freedomland," by Richard Price. Broadway Books. 512 pages. $25.Ripped from today's headlines!" That's how the hot quote for some book that presumably echoes the latest dirt in the daily press is supposed to read. And usually, you'd just as soon rip out such a book's pages for the bottom of the parakeet cage. But Richard Price has indeed taken one of the most gruesome tabloid stories of the '90s and turned it into a smart and serious vehicle that, for the most part, rips along throughout his sixth novel, "Freedomland.
NEWS
By Brian E. Crowley and Brian E. Crowley,Cox News Service | June 14, 1992
CLOCKERS.Richard Price.Houghton Mifflin.599 pages; $22.95. Strike Durham is a cocaine dealer. Not the flashy, witty drug dealer of "Miami Vice" -- Strike leads a crew of teen-age, $10-bottle sellers in the New Jersey projects across the river from Manhattan.At 19, Strike is a veteran of the streets. His tough-guy image keeps him alive. His bleeding ulcer is the result of turmoil, conflict and fear. Strike, it turns out, is more than just a dope-dealing thug. In many ways, despite the scars, he is still just a struggling kid who often wonders if there is a way out."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 20, 1992
About halfway through "Basic Instinct" I was seized with a primordial urge, a spasm of undeniable wanting that arose from deep within my being. I fought it, but what can a man do in the grip of such a demon? And so I gave in and . . . ZZZZZZ-ZZZZZZZZZ-ZZZZZZZZ!Overpublicized and underbrained,"Basic Instinct" is a bitter disappointment, worth maybe a 10th of the hype that the media have so obligingly ladled out for its benefit. It makes you feel dirty in the morning. A thin and unconvincing mystery story, it is really driven forward not by plot or character but by the two or three quasi-hot scenes in which highly paid movie stars cavort like Erica and Long Dong in any of a half-million craftless tapes since porn moved to video.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 20, 1992
About halfway through "Basic Instinct" I was seized with a primordial urge,a spasm of undeniable wanting that arose from deep within my being. I fought it, but what can a man do in the grip of such a demon? And so I gave in and . . . ZZZZZZ-ZZZZZZZZZ!Overpublicized and underbrained,"Basic Instinct" is a bitter disappointment, worth maybe a 10th of the hype that the media have so obligingly ladled out for its benefit. It makes you feel dirty in the morning. A thin and unconvincing mystery story, it is really driven forward not by plot or character but by the two or three quasi-hot scenes in which highly paid movie stars cavort like Erica and Long Dong in any of a half-million craftless tapes since porn moved to video.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | June 9, 2004
Mike Sabo is waiting for his heart to arrive. It is due any minute from Los Angeles. Just before lunch, an assistant hands him a small brown box. Sabo slashes through the packing tape and reverently unwraps the organ. It's a beaut: crimson with purple overtones, made of gelatin, and, on this sweltering day, cool and faintly moist to the touch. Sabo studies the heart with satisfaction. It will play a starring role in the autopsy scene of the HBO television show The Wire, which is scheduled to be shot later this May afternoon.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1997
Moments after he was convicted of murder, was stared down by the victim's mother and was sentenced to life plus 20 years, Robert Denny professed his innocence and left Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday -- smiling."
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | April 18, 1991
In 1984, "Saturday Night Live" alumnus Bill Murray got savaged by critics for attempting a serious dramatic role in the remake of the 1946 Tyrone Power classic "The Razor's Edge" and has stuck with comedy ever since. But he may be heading into treacherous critical waters again.Sources close to Murray say his next film project may be "Mad Dogs and Glory," in which he would co-star with really serious actor Robert De Niro. The script, by Richard Price ("The Color of Money"), is the story of a thug loan shark (the role Murray would play)
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