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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 11, 2001
When I watched Richard Linklater's extraordinary new movie, Waking Life (at the Charles), the title of Delmore Schwartz's great short story, "In Dreams Begin Responsibilities," kept ping-ponging through my brain. When I reread the story weeks later, I found more than the title matched. Schwartz's story begins when a man enters a motion picture theater. As he relaxes anonymously "in the soft darkness," he realizes that he's viewing a silent picture of his parents' courtship. He loses himself over and over again in his parents' story, intermittently weeping and cursing at the action on the screen.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 14, 2006
With everything this film has going for it - humor, intelligence and a splendid ensemble - Richard Linklater's nightmare drug movie, A Scanner Darkly, should be continually compelling. But it loses its fizz after a strong series of pops. Instead of a moviemaking vision, it merely has a look: an unsettling, changeable new form of animated live action. And, instead of a lucid, original take on wigged-out junkies and the government that spies on and manipulates them, it slavishly follows Philip K. Dick's 1977 novel of the same name.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1991
''Slacker'' is a cult film. It was meant to play special theaters and in this instance, it is. It is showing at the Charles.The film, written, produced and directed by Richard Linklater, is a "chain" comedy in which the cameras introduce us to one character, who, in turn, meets another, who, in turn, becomes the focal character.For a time, the film just bores, then as we get used to the format, it begins to entertain. This enchantment lasts for a time, then the movie begins to bore again, primarily because the characters are boring.
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By MICHAEL PHILLIPS and MICHAEL PHILLIPS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 15, 2006
Opening Wednesday, the 59th Festival de Cannes unfurls its red carpet just in time for a planned municipal police strike. It won't be the first strike scheduled around festival time in the French Riviera town famous for being famous, and for being beautiful, and for treating the motion picture arts and sciences like cultural gold. But if the cops walk, will anyone notice? The Cannes film festival - the premier show business pileup of art, commerce, cleavage and Brad Pitt stubble - promises its customary blend of Hollywood and international cinema.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 14, 2006
With everything this film has going for it - humor, intelligence and a splendid ensemble - Richard Linklater's nightmare drug movie, A Scanner Darkly, should be continually compelling. But it loses its fizz after a strong series of pops. Instead of a moviemaking vision, it merely has a look: an unsettling, changeable new form of animated live action. And, instead of a lucid, original take on wigged-out junkies and the government that spies on and manipulates them, it slavishly follows Philip K. Dick's 1977 novel of the same name.
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By Vincent Canby and Vincent Canby,New York Times News Service | October 3, 1991
The place is Austin, Texas. The time, morning, afternoon, night and morning again.A young fellow in a car runs over his mother and speeds off home, to wait for the police. At the scene of the accident, amid talk of calling an ambulance, a man tries to pick up a young woman who is jogging.A guy sitting in a restaurant asks his friends, "Who's ever written the great work about the immense effort required not to create?"A few blocks away a stoned soothsayer is revealing, though probably not for the first time, "We've been on Mars since 1962."
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 9, 2001
Waking Life is a beautiful display of celluloid bungee-jumping. This computer-animated cartoon feature for adults takes us on one death-defying leap into one void after another, intermittently tugging us back to a narrative about an innocent young figure (Wiley Wiggins) caught in a dream that won't end. He learns how to stop worrying and love his dreamscape. And so do we. Wiggins hooks up with, or eavesdrops on, dozens of fascinating characters who talk about the meaning of dreams - and the meaning of life.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 16, 2004
Richard Linklater's Before Sunset is a vibrant emotional epic about a man and a woman talking as they stroll in and out of a cafe, a garden path and a tourist boat during the waning hours of a beautiful Parisian afternoon. Only the physical weather is placid. If the co-writer-director, Richard Linklater, could draw a meteorological map of this couple's romantic fluctuations, the screen would ripple with isobars and isotherms and wildly shifting temperatures. In Linklater's Before Sunrise (1995)
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By MICHAEL PHILLIPS and MICHAEL PHILLIPS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 15, 2006
Opening Wednesday, the 59th Festival de Cannes unfurls its red carpet just in time for a planned municipal police strike. It won't be the first strike scheduled around festival time in the French Riviera town famous for being famous, and for being beautiful, and for treating the motion picture arts and sciences like cultural gold. But if the cops walk, will anyone notice? The Cannes film festival - the premier show business pileup of art, commerce, cleavage and Brad Pitt stubble - promises its customary blend of Hollywood and international cinema.
NEWS
By Joe Garofoli and Joe Garofoli,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 30, 1997
Richard Linklater laughs at the juxtaposition. The writer/director of "Slacker," the movie that inspired the pop-culture term, is dining at San Francisco's posh Ritz-Carlton hotel. You can easily pick out the erstwhile slacker in the sea of dark suits and white hair; he's the one in the thermal pullover and jeans.This isn't a case of Slacker Goes Nob Hill. It's just Hollywood custom that Castle Rock Entertainment would house the director of its new film, "subUrbia," in swank digs. Yet six years after "Slacker" introduced Linklater to the world, the 35-year-old remains anti-Hollywood.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 16, 2004
Richard Linklater's Before Sunset is a vibrant emotional epic about a man and a woman talking as they stroll in and out of a cafe, a garden path and a tourist boat during the waning hours of a beautiful Parisian afternoon. Only the physical weather is placid. If the co-writer-director, Richard Linklater, could draw a meteorological map of this couple's romantic fluctuations, the screen would ripple with isobars and isotherms and wildly shifting temperatures. In Linklater's Before Sunrise (1995)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 11, 2001
When I watched Richard Linklater's extraordinary new movie, Waking Life (at the Charles), the title of Delmore Schwartz's great short story, "In Dreams Begin Responsibilities," kept ping-ponging through my brain. When I reread the story weeks later, I found more than the title matched. Schwartz's story begins when a man enters a motion picture theater. As he relaxes anonymously "in the soft darkness," he realizes that he's viewing a silent picture of his parents' courtship. He loses himself over and over again in his parents' story, intermittently weeping and cursing at the action on the screen.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 9, 2001
Waking Life is a beautiful display of celluloid bungee-jumping. This computer-animated cartoon feature for adults takes us on one death-defying leap into one void after another, intermittently tugging us back to a narrative about an innocent young figure (Wiley Wiggins) caught in a dream that won't end. He learns how to stop worrying and love his dreamscape. And so do we. Wiggins hooks up with, or eavesdrops on, dozens of fascinating characters who talk about the meaning of dreams - and the meaning of life.
NEWS
By Joe Garofoli and Joe Garofoli,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 30, 1997
Richard Linklater laughs at the juxtaposition. The writer/director of "Slacker," the movie that inspired the pop-culture term, is dining at San Francisco's posh Ritz-Carlton hotel. You can easily pick out the erstwhile slacker in the sea of dark suits and white hair; he's the one in the thermal pullover and jeans.This isn't a case of Slacker Goes Nob Hill. It's just Hollywood custom that Castle Rock Entertainment would house the director of its new film, "subUrbia," in swank digs. Yet six years after "Slacker" introduced Linklater to the world, the 35-year-old remains anti-Hollywood.
FEATURES
By Vincent Canby and Vincent Canby,New York Times News Service | October 3, 1991
The place is Austin, Texas. The time, morning, afternoon, night and morning again.A young fellow in a car runs over his mother and speeds off home, to wait for the police. At the scene of the accident, amid talk of calling an ambulance, a man tries to pick up a young woman who is jogging.A guy sitting in a restaurant asks his friends, "Who's ever written the great work about the immense effort required not to create?"A few blocks away a stoned soothsayer is revealing, though probably not for the first time, "We've been on Mars since 1962."
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1991
''Slacker'' is a cult film. It was meant to play special theaters and in this instance, it is. It is showing at the Charles.The film, written, produced and directed by Richard Linklater, is a "chain" comedy in which the cameras introduce us to one character, who, in turn, meets another, who, in turn, becomes the focal character.For a time, the film just bores, then as we get used to the format, it begins to entertain. This enchantment lasts for a time, then the movie begins to bore again, primarily because the characters are boring.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 17, 2006
Fast Food Nation shouldn't cause audiences to lose their lunch, but it may make them wonder where it's been. Fast Food Nation (Fox Searchlight) Starring Greg Kinnear, Catalina Sandino Moreno, Ashley Johnson. Directed by Richard Linklater. Rated R. Time 106 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 22, 1993
There's an old Chinese curse that says: "May you live in the '70s."Well, maybe there's not, but there should be. So now we have a movie that takes us back to . . . disco . . . platform shoes . . . marijuana . . . Watergate. One question it never answers: Why?Another question it never answers: Who cares?"Dazed and Confused" is being called the "American Graffiti" of the '70s, primarily by the people who have money invested in it. And it has superficial similarities: It's one of those magic-night numbers, where a disparate mob of teen-agers, liberated from ++ their last day of school, wanders through an eventide that seems last a million years, meeting, combining and recombining, having adventures, getting high or getting drunk or getting high and getting drunk, falling in love, falling out of love . . . you get the picture.
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