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August 26, 1991
COMMACK, N.Y. -- Ivan Lendl ended a six-month victory drought just in time for the U.S. Open, defeating top seed Stefan Edberg, 6-3, 6-2, in the Norstar Bank Hamlet Challenge Cup yesterday.Lendl, who had been slow in recovering from surgery to his right hand in May, needed 1 hour, 21 minutes to dispose of Edberg, ranked second in the world.It was the fifth Hamlet title for Lendl, who was cautious about what the victory might mean for his chances in the U.S. Open, which will begin today."Winning breeds winning," said Lendl, ranked fifth in the world, his lowest position in 10 years.
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By Lisa Dillman and Lisa Dillman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2003
WIMBLEDON, England - You would expect the line - or the queue, as they say around here - of willing-and-able coaches to stretch into the distance when word went out that 20-year-old Andy Roddick was searching for a replacement after recently parting with Tarik Benhabiles. So, Roddick called the home of the guy at the top of the list. And promptly heard the dial tone. They always say rejection is only a phone call away. Kidding aside, the 6-year-old daughter of Brad Gilbert does what kids often do when they pick up the phone and Mom or Dad isn't home.
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SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 1996
PARIS -- Pete Sampras survived the inquisition and the two-sets-to-none scare Jim Courier supplied, but his counterpart at the head of the women's draw, the three-time champion Monica Seles, did the unthinkable and lost because she played scared.Back in Paris for the French Open, which she ruled from 1990 to '92, for the first time since she was stabbed by a deranged German in April 1993, Seles had reverted to her customary invincibility until yesterday. And her sudden vulnerability took her completely by surprise.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 3, 2002
WIMBLEDON, England - He used to change his hair color like other guys changed their shirts, used to skip practice, used to have an attitude, used to carry a label as a flashy tennis player of promise. But Xavier Malisse of Belgium never really found any tennis success until he decided to get serious about his sport. And yesterday, the 21-year-old, ponytailed swashbuckler packed his revived career into a one-set showdown with Britain's Greg Rusedski. On Centre Court, facing a crowd of flag-waving British fans, Malisse was trying to close out a match that was tied at two sets apiece when darkness descended Monday.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1996
WIMBLEDON, England -- Pete Sampras looked at Richard Krajicek across the net on his favorite court, Centre Court at Wimbledon, before the second-set tiebreaker, noted his opponent's loose, confident body language, and felt an unfamiliar tension.Here he was, the three-time defending champion, having been unable to take advantage of five break-point opportunities in the second set of this quarterfinal match that would drag on over two days.One chance, in particular, worried him. He had had set point at 5-5 and missed a backhand, a shot he normally doesn't miss, by less than an inch; missed it by so little that he thought it was in. But the line judge said no, it was wide.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 25, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- They sure don't mind rushing along the new teen-agers at Wimbledon.Yesterday, 16-year-old Anna Kournikova of Russia, unseeded but hardly unknown, made her Wimbledon debut in a little out of the way spot known as Centre Court.She beat Chanda Rubin, 6-1, 6-1, and then faced the ravenous British tabloid reporters.The reporters tried to lure her into all sorts of controversies.Did she talk trash about the play of another top teen, Venus Williams?"I never say anything about players," she said.
SPORTS
April 8, 1991
Top-seeded Agassi wins 2nd PrudentialTop-seeded Andre Agassi overcame blistering midday heat and the power game of Derrick Rostagno for a 6-2, 1-6, 6-3 victory yesterday in the final of the Prudential Securities Tennis Classic.Agassi earned $32,400 with his first tournament victory of the year. Agassi won the event in 1989.The first set was a rout for Agassi, who belted the ball crisply past, around and through Rostagno, picking up service breaks in the fifth and seventh games. Fourth-seeded Rostagno, 25, seemed to flounder in the 100-plus degree courtside temperatures, making numerous unforced errors.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 3, 2002
WIMBLEDON, England - He used to change his hair color like other guys changed their shirts, used to skip practice, used to have an attitude, used to carry a label as a flashy tennis player of promise. But Xavier Malisse of Belgium never really found any tennis success until he decided to get serious about his sport. And yesterday, the 21-year-old, ponytailed swashbuckler packed his revived career into a one-set showdown with Britain's Greg Rusedski. On Centre Court, facing a crowd of flag-waving British fans, Malisse was trying to close out a match that was tied at two sets apiece when darkness descended Monday.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1996
NEW YORK -- Richard Krajicek's first serve in yesterday's match was supposed to send Stefan Edberg a message. Instead, it was Krajicek who got the message."
SPORTS
By Lisa Dillman and Lisa Dillman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2003
WIMBLEDON, England - You would expect the line - or the queue, as they say around here - of willing-and-able coaches to stretch into the distance when word went out that 20-year-old Andy Roddick was searching for a replacement after recently parting with Tarik Benhabiles. So, Roddick called the home of the guy at the top of the list. And promptly heard the dial tone. They always say rejection is only a phone call away. Kidding aside, the 6-year-old daughter of Brad Gilbert does what kids often do when they pick up the phone and Mom or Dad isn't home.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 25, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- They sure don't mind rushing along the new teen-agers at Wimbledon.Yesterday, 16-year-old Anna Kournikova of Russia, unseeded but hardly unknown, made her Wimbledon debut in a little out of the way spot known as Centre Court.She beat Chanda Rubin, 6-1, 6-1, and then faced the ravenous British tabloid reporters.The reporters tried to lure her into all sorts of controversies.Did she talk trash about the play of another top teen, Venus Williams?"I never say anything about players," she said.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1996
NEW YORK -- Richard Krajicek's first serve in yesterday's match was supposed to send Stefan Edberg a message. Instead, it was Krajicek who got the message."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1996
WIMBLEDON, England -- Pete Sampras looked at Richard Krajicek across the net on his favorite court, Centre Court at Wimbledon, before the second-set tiebreaker, noted his opponent's loose, confident body language, and felt an unfamiliar tension.Here he was, the three-time defending champion, having been unable to take advantage of five break-point opportunities in the second set of this quarterfinal match that would drag on over two days.One chance, in particular, worried him. He had had set point at 5-5 and missed a backhand, a shot he normally doesn't miss, by less than an inch; missed it by so little that he thought it was in. But the line judge said no, it was wide.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 1996
PARIS -- Pete Sampras survived the inquisition and the two-sets-to-none scare Jim Courier supplied, but his counterpart at the head of the women's draw, the three-time champion Monica Seles, did the unthinkable and lost because she played scared.Back in Paris for the French Open, which she ruled from 1990 to '92, for the first time since she was stabbed by a deranged German in April 1993, Seles had reverted to her customary invincibility until yesterday. And her sudden vulnerability took her completely by surprise.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1996
PARIS -- Wearing the little black tennis dress that has launched a thousand wolf whistles and raised more than a thousand eyebrows among the sport's fashion police, a quite contrary Mary Pierce, the next-to-last French Open hope of her not-so-native France, was whistled off Center Court yesterday in a hail of derisive jeers.The 12th-seeded Pierce was upset, 6-4, 6-2, by Germany's Barbara Rittner.Ranked 82d in the world and a loser to Pierce in all four of their previous meetings, Rittner managed to ignore the Pierce decolletage -- which has proven a great distraction and anirreverent marketing device for its maker, Nike -- and the Pierce agenda.
SPORTS
August 26, 1991
COMMACK, N.Y. -- Ivan Lendl ended a six-month victory drought just in time for the U.S. Open, defeating top seed Stefan Edberg, 6-3, 6-2, in the Norstar Bank Hamlet Challenge Cup yesterday.Lendl, who had been slow in recovering from surgery to his right hand in May, needed 1 hour, 21 minutes to dispose of Edberg, ranked second in the world.It was the fifth Hamlet title for Lendl, who was cautious about what the victory might mean for his chances in the U.S. Open, which will begin today."Winning breeds winning," said Lendl, ranked fifth in the world, his lowest position in 10 years.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1996
PARIS -- Wearing the little black tennis dress that has launched a thousand wolf whistles and raised more than a thousand eyebrows among the sport's fashion police, a quite contrary Mary Pierce, the next-to-last French Open hope of her not-so-native France, was whistled off Center Court yesterday in a hail of derisive jeers.The 12th-seeded Pierce was upset, 6-4, 6-2, by Germany's Barbara Rittner.Ranked 82d in the world and a loser to Pierce in all four of their previous meetings, Rittner managed to ignore the Pierce decolletage -- which has proven a great distraction and anirreverent marketing device for its maker, Nike -- and the Pierce agenda.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 3, 1998
WIMBLEDON, England -- So, here's the forecast for today's men's semifinals at Wimbledon: tennis thunder followed by British lightning.No. 14-seed Goran Ivanisevic and No. 9 Richard Krajicek, two big-serving bashers who never pass up the chance to score an ace, will meet in one semifinal.And the other match will pit local favorite Tim Henman, the No. 12 seed and great British hope, in an against-all-odds confrontation with No. 1 seed and four-time Wimbledon champion Pete Sampras.The matches provide a study in contrasts and temperaments.
SPORTS
April 8, 1991
Top-seeded Agassi wins 2nd PrudentialTop-seeded Andre Agassi overcame blistering midday heat and the power game of Derrick Rostagno for a 6-2, 1-6, 6-3 victory yesterday in the final of the Prudential Securities Tennis Classic.Agassi earned $32,400 with his first tournament victory of the year. Agassi won the event in 1989.The first set was a rout for Agassi, who belted the ball crisply past, around and through Rostagno, picking up service breaks in the fifth and seventh games. Fourth-seeded Rostagno, 25, seemed to flounder in the 100-plus degree courtside temperatures, making numerous unforced errors.
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