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By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 15, 1993
Richard Harris will repeat his award-winning performance in the title role of Luigi Pirandello's "Henry IV" at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre Nov. 2-28, Hope Quackenbush, managing director, has announced.Harris won London's 1990 Evening Standard Award for his portrayal of Pirandello's deluded protagonist, a wealthy Italian who hits his head and awakens believing that he is Germany's medieval monarch, Henry IV. The actor last appeared in Baltimore starring in "Camelot" in 1986.Directed by Val May, this production of "Henry IV" will make its American premiere in Baltimore and then continue on a national tour.
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NEWS
November 26, 2009
November 18, 2009 RICHARD. Visitation 2140 N. Fulton Avenue Sunday 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Family will receive friends Monday at the chapel at 12:00 p.m. funeral to follow at 12:30 p.m.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 26, 2002
For Richard Harris, control was everything. If only because he constantly seemed on the verge of losing it. Whether onstage as King Arthur in Camelot, onscreen as an English aristocrat turned American Indian in A Man Called Horse, or on record as the breathless crooner of Jimmy Webb's bizarre "MacArthur Park," certainly one of the most recklessly overwrought songs of the 1960s, Harris was a force of nature constantly pushing his own limits. Sometimes the results were exhilarating, sometimes they were embarrassing.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 29, 2007
CAMELOT -- Acorn / $29.99 With a new revival of Lerner and Loewe's Arthurian musical, Camelot, scheduled to play the Hippodrome Theatre next season, the release of the DVD version of the 1981 Broadway revival seemed like a good way to become reacquainted with this sumptuous work. Originally broadcast on HBO in 1983, this DVD is essentially an archival recording of the stage production that starred Richard Harris, re-creating his 1967 movie role. The liner notes by Harris' co-star, Meg Bussert, explain that the taping was done over several days and included some re-staging specifically for the cameras.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1996
It's impossible to walk away from "Cry, The Beloved Country" without being impressed by everyone and everything associated with it. Which is not something you can say about many Hollywood films these days.Of course, this isn't a Hollywood film, but rather the first film to come out of post-apartheid South Africa. So Tinseltown's image is safe.As is South Africa's future, if the film's twin themes of nobility and reconciliation are indeed reflective of the country that produced it. In bringing Alan Paton's acclaimed 1948 novel to the screen, director Darrell James Roodt and screenwriter Ronald Harwood concentrate on one simple message: People can live together better by practicing respect and tolerance than by embracing hate and belligerence.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 25, 2002
Alexandre Dumas' 1844 page-turner The Count of Monte Cristo might be an indestructible story. It stirred movie and TV audiences when done with diverse casting choices from Robert Donat to Richard Chamberlain and Gerard Depardieu, with remarkably different adaptations ranging from the fable-like to the historical and political. And it clicks again in this well-paced action-movie version, graced with a heartfelt performance from Jim Caviezel as Edmond Dantes, the self-made Count; a rip-roaring roguish turn from the knowing - almost all-knowing - Guy Pearce (Memento)
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 28, 2002
Here's a description from page eight of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, the first Potter book. "He was tall, thin and very old, judging by the silver of his hair and beard, which were both long enough to tuck into his belt. He was wearing long robes, a purple cloak that swept the ground, and high-heeled buckled boots. His blue eyes were light, bright and sparkling behind half-moon spectacles. And his nose was very long and crooked, as though it had been broken at least twice.
NEWS
September 22, 2005
On September 19, 2005, ORA, beloved mother of Richard Harris, Marian Harris and Betty Mc Cardell. She is also survived by 11 grandchildren, 3 sisters, 4 brothers, nieces, nephews and other relatives. Friends may visit the JAMES A. MORTON & SONS FUNERAL HOMES, INC., 1701 Laurens Street, Thursday 2 to 7 P.M. Funeral Services Friday at Calvary Baptist Church, 3911 Garrison Blvd. The family will receive friends 10:30 to 11:30 A.M. Funeral Services at 11:30.
NEWS
September 12, 2003
On September 9, 2003 CHARLES P. HARRIS; dear father of Charlene Harris-Newton and loving brother of Louise Johnson and Richard Harris; also survived by grandchildren Guy and Aiyana Newton. The family will receive friends from 3 to 5 P.M. on Sunday at the JOSEPH L. RUSS FUNERAL HOME 2222 W. North Ave. A Wake will be held at the New Psalmist Baptist Church, 4501 M-l Old Frederick Rd., from 11 to 11:30 A.M. on Monday when funeral service will begin.
NEWS
January 21, 2006
On January 20, 2006, LEROY N. HARRIS, SR.; beloved husband of the late Kathleen T. Harris (nee Simkins); son of the late Theodore R. and Anna K. Eckenrode Harris; devoted father of Leroy N. Harris, Jr., Neal J. Harris, David L. Harris, Robert A. Harris, Eleanor K. Mummaugh, Laura A. Rush and Janie L. Bennett; brother of Richard Harris. Also survived by 17 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. Service at the Eline Funeral Home, 934 S. Main Street, Hampstead, on Tuesday, at 10 A.M. Interment in the Falls Road United Methodist Church Cemetery.
NEWS
February 20, 2006
Donald Harris, a speech pathologist in the Baltimore public school system, died Feb. 13 while jogging. He was 54 and suffered from hardening of the arteries, his family said. Mr. Harris, who lived in Baltimore, was the seventh of 11 children. He was educated in the Baltimore County public school system, where he developed a love of track and field and graduated from Hereford High. He graduated from Towson University and earned a master's degree in speech pathology at the University of the District of Columbia.
NEWS
January 21, 2006
On January 20, 2006, LEROY N. HARRIS, SR.; beloved husband of the late Kathleen T. Harris (nee Simkins); son of the late Theodore R. and Anna K. Eckenrode Harris; devoted father of Leroy N. Harris, Jr., Neal J. Harris, David L. Harris, Robert A. Harris, Eleanor K. Mummaugh, Laura A. Rush and Janie L. Bennett; brother of Richard Harris. Also survived by 17 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. Service at the Eline Funeral Home, 934 S. Main Street, Hampstead, on Tuesday, at 10 A.M. Interment in the Falls Road United Methodist Church Cemetery.
NEWS
September 22, 2005
On September 19, 2005, ORA, beloved mother of Richard Harris, Marian Harris and Betty Mc Cardell. She is also survived by 11 grandchildren, 3 sisters, 4 brothers, nieces, nephews and other relatives. Friends may visit the JAMES A. MORTON & SONS FUNERAL HOMES, INC., 1701 Laurens Street, Thursday 2 to 7 P.M. Funeral Services Friday at Calvary Baptist Church, 3911 Garrison Blvd. The family will receive friends 10:30 to 11:30 A.M. Funeral Services at 11:30.
NEWS
September 12, 2003
On September 9, 2003 CHARLES P. HARRIS; dear father of Charlene Harris-Newton and loving brother of Louise Johnson and Richard Harris; also survived by grandchildren Guy and Aiyana Newton. The family will receive friends from 3 to 5 P.M. on Sunday at the JOSEPH L. RUSS FUNERAL HOME 2222 W. North Ave. A Wake will be held at the New Psalmist Baptist Church, 4501 M-l Old Frederick Rd., from 11 to 11:30 A.M. on Monday when funeral service will begin.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 28, 2002
Here's a description from page eight of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, the first Potter book. "He was tall, thin and very old, judging by the silver of his hair and beard, which were both long enough to tuck into his belt. He was wearing long robes, a purple cloak that swept the ground, and high-heeled buckled boots. His blue eyes were light, bright and sparkling behind half-moon spectacles. And his nose was very long and crooked, as though it had been broken at least twice.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 26, 2002
For Richard Harris, control was everything. If only because he constantly seemed on the verge of losing it. Whether onstage as King Arthur in Camelot, onscreen as an English aristocrat turned American Indian in A Man Called Horse, or on record as the breathless crooner of Jimmy Webb's bizarre "MacArthur Park," certainly one of the most recklessly overwrought songs of the 1960s, Harris was a force of nature constantly pushing his own limits. Sometimes the results were exhilarating, sometimes they were embarrassing.
NEWS
February 20, 2006
Donald Harris, a speech pathologist in the Baltimore public school system, died Feb. 13 while jogging. He was 54 and suffered from hardening of the arteries, his family said. Mr. Harris, who lived in Baltimore, was the seventh of 11 children. He was educated in the Baltimore County public school system, where he developed a love of track and field and graduated from Hereford High. He graduated from Towson University and earned a master's degree in speech pathology at the University of the District of Columbia.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 29, 2007
CAMELOT -- Acorn / $29.99 With a new revival of Lerner and Loewe's Arthurian musical, Camelot, scheduled to play the Hippodrome Theatre next season, the release of the DVD version of the 1981 Broadway revival seemed like a good way to become reacquainted with this sumptuous work. Originally broadcast on HBO in 1983, this DVD is essentially an archival recording of the stage production that starred Richard Harris, re-creating his 1967 movie role. The liner notes by Harris' co-star, Meg Bussert, explain that the taping was done over several days and included some re-staging specifically for the cameras.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 25, 2002
Alexandre Dumas' 1844 page-turner The Count of Monte Cristo might be an indestructible story. It stirred movie and TV audiences when done with diverse casting choices from Robert Donat to Richard Chamberlain and Gerard Depardieu, with remarkably different adaptations ranging from the fable-like to the historical and political. And it clicks again in this well-paced action-movie version, graced with a heartfelt performance from Jim Caviezel as Edmond Dantes, the self-made Count; a rip-roaring roguish turn from the knowing - almost all-knowing - Guy Pearce (Memento)
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