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Richard Hamilton

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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 26, 1999
Edward Hamilton was a steel worker who knew how to handle a pool stick. His grandson Richard knew how to handle a basketball. Neither would talk about his gifts much, especially last summer, when the two would sit together in front of the television wondering what the fall would bring.Richard Hamilton was worried about the foot he had broken in July at the USA Basketball tryouts for the world championships. The broken foot, in which a screw was implanted, kept him from traveling on a tour with his Connecticut teammates.
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SPORTS
By Ailene Voisin and Ailene Voisin,SACRAMENTO BEE | July 21, 2005
THE MAN has taken a few too many basketballs to the temple. Surely that explains it. Larry Brown, who is widely regarded as the premier coach in the NBA, has orchestrated one of the most unnecessary and implausible breakups in modern league history. He is leaping off the assembly line, gunning the engine, divorcing the Detroit Pistons after two wildly fulfilling seasons. He wins one title and almost wins two. He wins over minds, if not always hearts, and yet it isn't enough. He wants more.
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SPORTS
November 10, 1998
The Associated Press' 1998-99 preseason All-America team,selected by a 72-member national media panel:Player ............ School .... PosRichard Hamilton .. UConn ...... FMateen Cleaves .... Mich. St. .. GElton Brand ....... Duke ....... CLee Nailon ........ TCU ........ FAndre Miller ...... Utah ....... GOthers receiving votes (in alphabetical order): Ed Cota, N. Carolina; Baron Davis, UCLA; Khalid El-Amin, Connecticut; Obinna Ekezie, Maryland; Evan Eschmeyer, Northwestern; Jumaine Jones, Georgia; Trajan Langdon, Duke; Arthur Lee, Stanford; Todd MacCullough, Washington; Mike Madsen, Stanford; BJ McKie, S. Carolina; Lamar Odom, Rhode Isl.; Scott Padgett, Kentucky; James Posey, Xavier; Laron Profit, Maryland; Omar Sneed, Memphis; Wally Szczerbiak, Miami, Ohio; Jason Terry, Arizona; Jamel Thomas, Providence; Kenny Thomas, N. Mexico; Tim Young, Stanford.
NEWS
May 19, 2005
On May 16, 2005, CALVIN HAROLD, of Reisterstown, devoted husband of Sharon Hamilton (nee Seipp), beloved father of Brad Hamilton and Tech Sgt. Dawn Langston and husband David, step-father of W. Scott Senseney and wife Wendy, son-in-law of Romaine Seipp, brother of Marymagdalen Hamilton, Catherine Didas, Ann Houchin, Amy Myers, Patrick Hamilton, Patricia Casper, Richard Hamilton, Francis Hamilton and Mary Frances Tyrrell, grandfather of Brylea Luff, Shane...
NEWS
May 19, 2005
On May 16, 2005, CALVIN HAROLD, of Reisterstown, devoted husband of Sharon Hamilton (nee Seipp), beloved father of Brad Hamilton and Tech Sgt. Dawn Langston and husband David, step-father of W. Scott Senseney and wife Wendy, son-in-law of Romaine Seipp, brother of Marymagdalen Hamilton, Catherine Didas, Ann Houchin, Amy Myers, Patrick Hamilton, Patricia Casper, Richard Hamilton, Francis Hamilton and Mary Frances Tyrrell, grandfather of Brylea Luff, Shane...
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2000
WASHINGTON - The Washington Wizards threw out the conventional game plan last night, curbing their reliance on their Big Three, hitting their free throws, particularly in crunch time and playing exceptional defense. In return, they were rewarded with a come-from-behind, 107-100 win over the Milwaukee Bucks at MCI Center, before a surprisingly boisterous crowd of 13,157. "It's been unfortunate for us that we've had to endure someone else stepping up that was a non-starter or a non-main player that has made the difference in the games that we've lost," Washington coach Leonard Hamilton said.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - Who said things were supposed to make sense in the NBA? The Charlotte Hornets, one of the Eastern Conference's best teams, hit nine of 15 three-pointers last night at MCI Center, while the Washington Wizards, one of the league's worst teams, hit none. The Hornets brought in one of the league's talented, if unheralded, backcourts in Baron Davis and David Wesley, while the Wizards not only were without both of their regular starting point guards, but had Richard Hamilton, their makeshift playmaker, foul out with less than two minutes to go. So, of course, in a truth-is-stranger-than-fiction outcome, the Wizards won. Juwan Howard's baseline turnaround with 1.8 seconds left lifted Washington to a 97-95 victory, its second straight, before a crowd of 11,579 that included a rare appearance by president of basketball operations Michael Jordan.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2001
WASHINGTON - There are probably worse ways to lose a game than the fashion in which the Washington Wizards dropped last night's 100-96 decision to the Orlando Magic, but none that immediately come to mind. The Wizards led by 10 points with 7:03 to go, then went scoreless for more than five minutes on the back end of the fourth quarter, as their five-game winning streak went up in smoke. "It's one of those games that you always think about, and you try to figure out what happened" said Washington coach Leonard Hamilton.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | January 15, 2005
WIZARDS FANS are leaving their No. 23 jerseys home in the closet this season. They're asking a simple question: Michael Who? Eighteen months A.J. (After Jordan), the Wizards are one of the surprises in an NBA where the Lakers are no longer a dynasty, the Timberwolves have fallen off as Western Conference powers, where the Nets are light-years away from their twin Eastern Conference titles. A lot can change in 18 months, including the future of a franchise that traded Michael Jordan for coach Eddie Jordan, then brought in Ernie Grunfeld to the front office to do for Washington what he did in New York and Milwaukee: win, but more than just win. "I don't know what happened before I got here.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
CLEVELAND - The arena is different, as the Cleveland Cavaliers have moved downtown from Richfield Coliseum to Gund Arena. And the uniform of the tormentor has changed, from that of the Chicago Bulls to the Washington Wizards. But some things don't change: Michael Jordan always beats the Cavaliers. He did it last night by nailing a 15-foot jumper at the buzzer to give Washington a 93-92 win before a stunned sellout crowd. Unlike the last time he broke Cleveland's heart, with a buzzer-beater over Craig Ehlo to knock the Cavaliers out of the 1989 playoffs, followed by repeated punching of the air, Jordan merely held his fist at about cheek level, as if he had fully well expected the improbable to become fact.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | January 15, 2005
WIZARDS FANS are leaving their No. 23 jerseys home in the closet this season. They're asking a simple question: Michael Who? Eighteen months A.J. (After Jordan), the Wizards are one of the surprises in an NBA where the Lakers are no longer a dynasty, the Timberwolves have fallen off as Western Conference powers, where the Nets are light-years away from their twin Eastern Conference titles. A lot can change in 18 months, including the future of a franchise that traded Michael Jordan for coach Eddie Jordan, then brought in Ernie Grunfeld to the front office to do for Washington what he did in New York and Milwaukee: win, but more than just win. "I don't know what happened before I got here.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Michael Jordan said the other day that his Washington Wizards teammate Popeye Jones deserved to be heading to Philadelphia for Sunday's NBA All-Star Game as much as he did. Given that Jones is usually a third or fourth offensive option at best, Jordan's declaration may have seemed like hyperbole, but the veteran power forward played like an All-Star physically and mentally last night, helping the Wizards to a 108-101 win over the Sacramento Kings...
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
CLEVELAND - The arena is different, as the Cleveland Cavaliers have moved downtown from Richfield Coliseum to Gund Arena. And the uniform of the tormentor has changed, from that of the Chicago Bulls to the Washington Wizards. But some things don't change: Michael Jordan always beats the Cavaliers. He did it last night by nailing a 15-foot jumper at the buzzer to give Washington a 93-92 win before a stunned sellout crowd. Unlike the last time he broke Cleveland's heart, with a buzzer-beater over Craig Ehlo to knock the Cavaliers out of the 1989 playoffs, followed by repeated punching of the air, Jordan merely held his fist at about cheek level, as if he had fully well expected the improbable to become fact.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2002
WASHINGTON - It's nearly mid-January, and in recent seasons, that has usually meant that the Washington Wizards have started firming up mid-April tee times and making other off-season plans. But for now, with an 18-14 record heading into tonight's game in Milwaukee against the Central Division-leading Bucks, it's not so crazy to place Wizards and playoffs in the same sentence, and no one is happier about that than point guard Chris Whitney. Whitney, in his seventh year in Washington, has seen virtually every misery that has been visited on the franchise, going back to when the team still played in Landover and was known as the Bullets.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2001
WASHINGTON - There are probably worse ways to lose a game than the fashion in which the Washington Wizards dropped last night's 100-96 decision to the Orlando Magic, but none that immediately come to mind. The Wizards led by 10 points with 7:03 to go, then went scoreless for more than five minutes on the back end of the fourth quarter, as their five-game winning streak went up in smoke. "It's one of those games that you always think about, and you try to figure out what happened" said Washington coach Leonard Hamilton.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - Who said things were supposed to make sense in the NBA? The Charlotte Hornets, one of the Eastern Conference's best teams, hit nine of 15 three-pointers last night at MCI Center, while the Washington Wizards, one of the league's worst teams, hit none. The Hornets brought in one of the league's talented, if unheralded, backcourts in Baron Davis and David Wesley, while the Wizards not only were without both of their regular starting point guards, but had Richard Hamilton, their makeshift playmaker, foul out with less than two minutes to go. So, of course, in a truth-is-stranger-than-fiction outcome, the Wizards won. Juwan Howard's baseline turnaround with 1.8 seconds left lifted Washington to a 97-95 victory, its second straight, before a crowd of 11,579 that included a rare appearance by president of basketball operations Michael Jordan.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2002
WASHINGTON - It's nearly mid-January, and in recent seasons, that has usually meant that the Washington Wizards have started firming up mid-April tee times and making other off-season plans. But for now, with an 18-14 record heading into tonight's game in Milwaukee against the Central Division-leading Bucks, it's not so crazy to place Wizards and playoffs in the same sentence, and no one is happier about that than point guard Chris Whitney. Whitney, in his seventh year in Washington, has seen virtually every misery that has been visited on the franchise, going back to when the team still played in Landover and was known as the Bullets.
SPORTS
By Ailene Voisin and Ailene Voisin,SACRAMENTO BEE | July 21, 2005
THE MAN has taken a few too many basketballs to the temple. Surely that explains it. Larry Brown, who is widely regarded as the premier coach in the NBA, has orchestrated one of the most unnecessary and implausible breakups in modern league history. He is leaping off the assembly line, gunning the engine, divorcing the Detroit Pistons after two wildly fulfilling seasons. He wins one title and almost wins two. He wins over minds, if not always hearts, and yet it isn't enough. He wants more.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2000
WASHINGTON - The Washington Wizards threw out the conventional game plan last night, curbing their reliance on their Big Three, hitting their free throws, particularly in crunch time and playing exceptional defense. In return, they were rewarded with a come-from-behind, 107-100 win over the Milwaukee Bucks at MCI Center, before a surprisingly boisterous crowd of 13,157. "It's been unfortunate for us that we've had to endure someone else stepping up that was a non-starter or a non-main player that has made the difference in the games that we've lost," Washington coach Leonard Hamilton said.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 26, 1999
Edward Hamilton was a steel worker who knew how to handle a pool stick. His grandson Richard knew how to handle a basketball. Neither would talk about his gifts much, especially last summer, when the two would sit together in front of the television wondering what the fall would bring.Richard Hamilton was worried about the foot he had broken in July at the USA Basketball tryouts for the world championships. The broken foot, in which a screw was implanted, kept him from traveling on a tour with his Connecticut teammates.
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