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Richard Dreyfuss

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NEWS
By John Rivera and Suzanne Loudermilk and John Rivera and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
Baltimore's Jewish community gathered last night at several vigils to reflect, pray and denounce the violence that took the life of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who was buried earlier in the day.At the Chizuk Amuno Congregation in Baltimore County, a night that was to be a fund-raiser for the Associated Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore was turned into "A Gathering for Peace." Actor Richard Dreyfuss, who was to be the keynote speaker for the fund-raiser, reflected on Mr. Rabin, whom he had met on several occasions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
Watching "Leaves of Grass," a funny, intricate pinwheel of a movie about a classics professor and his marijuana-growing twin, you get caught up in the joy that Edward Norton had playing both these roles. Norton sparks writer-director Tim Blake Nelson's whole inspired ensemble — including Nelson himself, who plays the pot farmer's partner. Making sure to cram a press call in right before he interviewed Bruce Springsteen on Tuesday at the Toronto International Film Festival, Norton said he cottoned to Nelson's script "because I thought it was very original and I laughed a lot when I read it. " It's a thinking man's — and feeling man's — " Pineapple Express.
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NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | November 6, 1994
"Silent Fall,'' filmed in Talbot County, doesn't seem headed for blockbuster status. But the new murder mystery starring Baltimorean Ben Faulkner as an autistic child and Richard Dreyfuss as the psychiatrist who tries to learn what the boy witnessed, might contain surprises for some people in the film community.Sara Engram is editorial-page director of The Evening Sun.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 18, 2008
For months now, people have been saying to me, "Do you really think they're gone?" "Is it finally over?" "Is the coast clear?" The questions have been in response to Sen. Barack Obama's supposedly yeoman service in putting an end to the Clintons in public life. My response to those who believe our long national nightmare is over has always been: "Have you seen no monster movies?" Freddy Krueger always comes back. Jason re-emerges from the pond one more time. Dracula had so many comebacks that nobody was surprised to see him hanging with Abbott and Costello.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1996
It's a night for comparisons, as TV offers you the chance to evaluate movie versions of "Little Women" made 60 years apart and performances by Richard Dreyfuss before and after he became famous."
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 17, 1991
So, ''What About Bob?''Well, it isn't much of a film. It ranks somewhere down there with ''Nothing But Trouble,'' a very recent mishap that made poor use of Chevy Chase, Demi Moore and Dan Aykroyd.''What About Bob?'' is a little better than "Trouble," but not that much. It is too predictable and deals with a situation that is more irritating than amusing.To be fair, some members of the preview audience thought the film especially funny and said so. Well.Richard Dreyfuss and Bill Murray star.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 17, 1992
It's a pity that a fine building that housed a 1920s automobile dealership and that was seen in the film "Tin Men" is being demolished.The building, or what's left of it is in the 200 block of W. 29th St. The street outside the building's side entrance on Remington Avenue was the site where Richard Dreyfuss' car plowed into Danny DeVito's Cadillac in the movie. Earlier this week, the wrecking ball began its work on the building. What's left are tons of old steel and piles of masonry.The building was one of those magical and quirky buildings that architects loved to design 70 years ago. It was all imagination: an overhanging Spanish tile roof, tons of imitation Granada plaster and Seville wrought iron balconies.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 25, 2000
"Grumpy Old Goodfellas" it ain't. And that's despite the best efforts of "The Crew" to exploit prostate jokes and bleak mob humor for laughs. Richard Dreyfuss plays the leader of an aging mob crew who, with their best whacks behind them, have retired to Miami to watch thong-clad beauties and rail against the young, tan wannabes who are driving up prices in their apartment building. Once young, handsome and dangerous, the crew is now reduced to living like the schmoes they used to disparage: Bobby Bartellemeo (Dreyfuss)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | November 15, 1997
Hot on the heels of its triumph with "Cinderella," "The Wonderful World of Disney" takes on "Oliver Twist" (7 p.m.-9 p.m. tomorrow, WMAR, Channel 2) with much of the same exuberance, magic and charm.Just as Whitney Houston did in "Cinderella," Richard Dreyfuss both stars and serves as an executive producer in this production. His performance as Fagin is a magic act in that he manages to make this ancient tutor to a band of child pickpockets in Dickens' London both menacing and likable in a flim-flam-man kind of way.Almost as impressive are the performances of Elijah Wood as the Artful Dodger and Alex Trench as Oliver.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 1, 1991
'Once Around'Starring Holly Hunter and Richard Dreyfuss.Directed by Lasse Hallstrom.Released by Universal.Rated R.*** The best thing that can be said about "Once Around" is also the worst: At no point do you know what's going to happen next.This is good because it means that the movie refuses to concede to formula as it churns along, and that it stays doggedly fresh.This is bad because it means the movie never really makes up its own mind what it's about.There are whiffs and gleams of theme now and then but just when the story seems to settle down to explore them, they skitter away with a giggle, like elves, and the film lurches ahead in some amusing but furtive new direction.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 25, 2000
"Grumpy Old Goodfellas" it ain't. And that's despite the best efforts of "The Crew" to exploit prostate jokes and bleak mob humor for laughs. Richard Dreyfuss plays the leader of an aging mob crew who, with their best whacks behind them, have retired to Miami to watch thong-clad beauties and rail against the young, tan wannabes who are driving up prices in their apartment building. Once young, handsome and dangerous, the crew is now reduced to living like the schmoes they used to disparage: Bobby Bartellemeo (Dreyfuss)
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOE GROSSBERG and JOE GROSSBERG,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 9, 1998
Have you ever read a novel so engaging that you actually pictured yourself in it? Well, dress like a character in one of science fiction writer Harry Turtledove's works, and you just might win the chance to enjoy breakfast with the guest of honor at Balticon 32, one of the area's largest annual science-fiction conventions.It was over a breakfast of bacon and eggs that Turtledove came up with the idea for one of his quirkier short stories. As he recalls, "I thought, 'This tastes good. I wish to heaven it was kosher.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | November 15, 1997
Hot on the heels of its triumph with "Cinderella," "The Wonderful World of Disney" takes on "Oliver Twist" (7 p.m.-9 p.m. tomorrow, WMAR, Channel 2) with much of the same exuberance, magic and charm.Just as Whitney Houston did in "Cinderella," Richard Dreyfuss both stars and serves as an executive producer in this production. His performance as Fagin is a magic act in that he manages to make this ancient tutor to a band of child pickpockets in Dickens' London both menacing and likable in a flim-flam-man kind of way.Almost as impressive are the performances of Elijah Wood as the Artful Dodger and Alex Trench as Oliver.
NEWS
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 1996
"I'm Losing You," by Bruce Wagner. 356 pages. Villard Books. $23.Nowadays, the saying goes, all Americans have two professions, their own and show business.True, a lot of us read Movieline in the beauty parlor, or know someone who knows Brad Pitt, or have an opinion about Jim Carrey. But this national passion for star-tracking has led those who actually do work in the film business to a grand misconception: that anyone beyond themselves finds people in the entertainment industry - and I refer not to movie stars but to agents, producers, screenwriters, "development girls" and the like - in any way entertaining.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1996
It's a night for comparisons, as TV offers you the chance to evaluate movie versions of "Little Women" made 60 years apart and performances by Richard Dreyfuss before and after he became famous."
FEATURES
By David Rosenthal and David Rosenthal,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1996
MONTREAL -- They come from the fashionable west end, and from the western provinces, making a pilgrimage of sorts.Back to the old neighborhood, back for a taste found nowhere but Mile End.Bagels.White seed or black seed. Or, these days, cannelle (cinnamon) et raisin.But always made the old way, rolled thin by hand and baked in wood-burning ovens that provide a distinctive flavor."Whether you're French or English, bagels are Montreal food. They're a bridge, a meeting point," says Michel Zampa, a former Mile End resident who recalls buying dozens of bagels and putting them on a bus bound for relatives hundreds of miles west, in Windsor, Ontario.
NEWS
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 1996
"I'm Losing You," by Bruce Wagner. 356 pages. Villard Books. $23.Nowadays, the saying goes, all Americans have two professions, their own and show business.True, a lot of us read Movieline in the beauty parlor, or know someone who knows Brad Pitt, or have an opinion about Jim Carrey. But this national passion for star-tracking has led those who actually do work in the film business to a grand misconception: that anyone beyond themselves finds people in the entertainment industry - and I refer not to movie stars but to agents, producers, screenwriters, "development girls" and the like - in any way entertaining.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOE GROSSBERG and JOE GROSSBERG,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 9, 1998
Have you ever read a novel so engaging that you actually pictured yourself in it? Well, dress like a character in one of science fiction writer Harry Turtledove's works, and you just might win the chance to enjoy breakfast with the guest of honor at Balticon 32, one of the area's largest annual science-fiction conventions.It was over a breakfast of bacon and eggs that Turtledove came up with the idea for one of his quirkier short stories. As he recalls, "I thought, 'This tastes good. I wish to heaven it was kosher.
NEWS
By John Rivera and Suzanne Loudermilk and John Rivera and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
Baltimore's Jewish community gathered last night at several vigils to reflect, pray and denounce the violence that took the life of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who was buried earlier in the day.At the Chizuk Amuno Congregation in Baltimore County, a night that was to be a fund-raiser for the Associated Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore was turned into "A Gathering for Peace." Actor Richard Dreyfuss, who was to be the keynote speaker for the fund-raiser, reflected on Mr. Rabin, whom he had met on several occasions.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | November 6, 1994
"Silent Fall,'' filmed in Talbot County, doesn't seem headed for blockbuster status. But the new murder mystery starring Baltimorean Ben Faulkner as an autistic child and Richard Dreyfuss as the psychiatrist who tries to learn what the boy witnessed, might contain surprises for some people in the film community.Sara Engram is editorial-page director of The Evening Sun.
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