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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2005
LEXINGTON, N.C. - For generations, farmers in the Yadkin Valley have grown tobacco. But the demand for that plant has dropped, so many are turning to another green, leafy crop - grapes. As in the wine-making kind. And if the image of Tobacco Road morphing into Winery Way sets North Carolina stereotypes on their ear, consider this: The valley's biggest wine producer, a man who lives in a Tuscan-inspired estate, packs impeccable good ol' boy credentials. Richard Childress, 59, once made early-morning moonshine runs, raced stock cars and owned NASCAR's most famous car, the No. 3 of the late seven-time champion Dale Earnhardt.
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SPORTS
November 23, 2011
The iconic No. 3 may be back in the Sprint Cup starting lineup one day, a possibility that may send some NASCAR fans into an emotional tizzy. That number belonged to Dale Earnhardt , the late, great Intimidator on the NASCAR circuit. Would it be disrespectful for another driver to drive a car with that number? We may find out soon enough. Austin Dillon — the grandson of Richard Childress — already is set to drive a No. 3 Chevy in the Nationwide Series next season.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - Richard Childress walks through the garage alone. He never really thought it would be like this - never spent any time considering how he and his race team would operate without his longtime friend and driver, Dale Earnhardt. Oh, the two of them had talked about it a few years back when they were on a hunting trip in New Mexico and Childress had "wrecked his horse" and cracked his head while falling off the side of a mountain. They had told each other at the time that if anything happened to one, the other was to continue with the business.
SPORTS
By Tribune Newspapers | July 31, 2011
— When the news broke in early June, the public vitriol aimed at NASCAR driver Kyle Busch burst into view. Reports had surfaced that NASCAR team owner Richard Childress, fed up with Busch running into this drivers in recent races, grabbed Busch in the Kansas Speedway garage and punched him. NASCAR then levied a $150,000 fine on Childress. But in the court of public opinion, it was Childress, 65, who was presumed innocent and the temperamental Busch, 26, who had it coming.
SPORTS
By Ed Hinton and Ed Hinton,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 16, 2007
FORT WORTH, Texas -- Jeff Burton had subtly called his shot two days earlier. "I think it's cool there hasn't been a repeat winner," Burton had said Friday of quirky Texas Motor Speedway, which had produced 12 different winners in its first 12 Nextel Cup races. "I think it would be even cooler if we could stop that this weekend." His tone made that more than wishful thinking. Burton had won the first race here, in 1997. And somehow he exuded a sense he would win again a decade later. By Saturday his team owner, Richard Childress, caught the notion.
SPORTS
By George Diaz | June 15, 2011
Now that Kevin Harvick and Kyle Busch are out of probationary prison, it's Game On again. Although Busch wants to move forward and symbolically sign some kind of truce and drive nice, Harvick is ready to rumble again. "He knows he has one coming," Harvick said after finishing fifth at Pocono on Sunday, only two spots behind Busch. The two got tangled up briefly when Harvick forced Busch down the track early in the race. "I just wanted him to think about it," Harvick said.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2002
DOVER, Del. - Richard Childress, who owns three Winston Cup cars, is swapping crew chiefs and crews on those driven by Kevin Harvick and Robby Gordon. "We've just got to make changes," said Childress, whose teams are a disappointing 33rd and 29th in points, respectively. "It's time. When things don't happen right and you're not performing. We're in the performance business. I think this could be our best fix." This is not the first time Childress has swapped the top mechanics. In 1998, he flopped the crew chiefs on the Dale Earnhardt and Mike Skinner cars.
SPORTS
By SANDRA McKEE | May 25, 2003
Robby Gordon. Remember when no one respected him, liked him or gave him a chance at being a successful big-time Winston Cup or Indy Car driver? He was too pigheaded - or hardheaded. He was too arrogant. Too much of a know-it-all. But today, Gordon goes into the Indianapolis 500 as the outside pole-sitter and a favorite to win the race. And when he has finished there, he'll head to Concord, N.C., to compete in the Coca-Cola 600. His chances of winning there aren't bad, either. When did Robby Gordon go from persona non grata to respected competitor?
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2001
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - Car owner Richard Childress and Dale Earnhardt had been a team for 17 years and one race. And they had planned to be a team for at least five more years. But Sunday in the Daytona 500, the race in which they loved to chase victory more than any other, Earnhardt crashed into the fourth-turn wall and the dynasty they had spent decades building came to a sudden halt. "Dale was my friend," Childress said in a statement. "We hunted and raced together. We laughed and cried together.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2004
WELCOME, N.C. - Kerry Earnhardt can't keep his hand off the smooth finish of the black Chevrolet sitting in the garage at Richard Childress Racing. And the very sight of this combination - an Earnhardt, a black Chevy and a car owner named Richard Childress - is enough to generate both deja vu and anticipation. You see the name Earnhardt printed above the driver's-side window and the No. 33 on the car door and you look twice, to make sure it is 33 and not No. 3, the number made famous by the late seven-time Winston Cup champion Dale Earnhardt, who teamed with Childress for six of those titles.
SPORTS
By George Diaz | June 15, 2011
Now that Kevin Harvick and Kyle Busch are out of probationary prison, it's Game On again. Although Busch wants to move forward and symbolically sign some kind of truce and drive nice, Harvick is ready to rumble again. "He knows he has one coming," Harvick said after finishing fifth at Pocono on Sunday, only two spots behind Busch. The two got tangled up briefly when Harvick forced Busch down the track early in the race. "I just wanted him to think about it," Harvick said.
SPORTS
October 6, 2010
Clint Bowyer and Richard Childress Racing lost their final appeal Tuesday on the penalties, including a 150-point deduction, they received following their victory in the Chase opener at New Hampshire. NASCAR had voted 3-0 against RCR's initial appeal last week. Team owner Richard Childress insisted he had proof Bowyer's car was out of tolerance because of a push from a wrecker after running out of gas following the victory burnout. But that proved pointless. "After reviewing all the data, presentation and factors involved, I am ruling NASCAR was correct in its decision to levy penalties," said John Middlebrook, the National Stock Car Racing chief appellate officer who presided over the hearing.
SPORTS
By Tania Ganguli On auto racing | February 24, 2010
Did you miss it amid the griping that Jimmie Johnson was back at it? Did the real change from last season to this one escape you? There they were, racing right up with Hendrick Motorsports - the three Richard Childress Racing cars that had all but disappeared from the NASCAR scene last season. Kevin Harvick finished second in Sunday's Auto Club 500, Jeff Burton third and Clint Bowyer eighth as Johnson won the race. But two races in, Harvick leads the points standings. The RCR teams mostly made news last season when something went wrong.
SPORTS
By Ed Hinton and Ed Hinton,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 16, 2007
FORT WORTH, Texas -- Jeff Burton had subtly called his shot two days earlier. "I think it's cool there hasn't been a repeat winner," Burton had said Friday of quirky Texas Motor Speedway, which had produced 12 different winners in its first 12 Nextel Cup races. "I think it would be even cooler if we could stop that this weekend." His tone made that more than wishful thinking. Burton had won the first race here, in 1997. And somehow he exuded a sense he would win again a decade later. By Saturday his team owner, Richard Childress, caught the notion.
BUSINESS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2005
LEXINGTON, N.C. - For generations, farmers in the Yadkin Valley have grown tobacco. But the demand for that plant has dropped, so many are turning to another green, leafy crop - grapes. As in the wine-making kind. And if the image of Tobacco Road morphing into Winery Way sets North Carolina stereotypes on their ear, consider this: The valley's biggest wine producer, a man who lives in a Tuscan-inspired estate, packs impeccable good ol' boy credentials. Richard Childress, 59, once made early-morning moonshine runs, raced stock cars and owned NASCAR's most famous car, the No. 3 of the late seven-time champion Dale Earnhardt.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2004
DOVER, Del. - Nextel Cup driver Jeremy Mayfield won the pole for tomorrow's MBNA America 400 and emerged from his No. 19 Dodge with a bright orange T-shirt just visible under his driver's suit. "I want you," was all that could be seen. What's that you're wearing, he was asked. "It's just a funny little joke," Mayfield said as he unzipped the top of his suit and pulled it open to reveal the rest of the message: "I want you ... to stay far, far away from me," "You probably know who the `you' is," said Mayfield, who was caught up in a wreck last weekend that was intentionally caused by Robby Gordon, who drives the orange No. 31 Chevrolet owned by Richard Childress.
SPORTS
By SANDRA McKEE and SANDRA McKEE,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- Mike Skinner was walking toward the Winston Cup garage when a woman stopped him for an autograph."Excuse, me, Terry," she said. "Could you sign this?"The smile lines around Mike Skinner's eyes creased, and a grin appeared beneath his Labonte-like mustache."I'm not Terry Labonte," he said. "I'm taller and not as rich, but I'll sign it for you."And this was after Mike Skinner, the Winston Cup rookie driving for car owner Richard Childress, had won the pole for Sunday's Daytona 500 with a 189.813 mph run in his Chevrolet.
SPORTS
November 23, 2011
The iconic No. 3 may be back in the Sprint Cup starting lineup one day, a possibility that may send some NASCAR fans into an emotional tizzy. That number belonged to Dale Earnhardt , the late, great Intimidator on the NASCAR circuit. Would it be disrespectful for another driver to drive a car with that number? We may find out soon enough. Austin Dillon — the grandson of Richard Childress — already is set to drive a No. 3 Chevy in the Nationwide Series next season.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2004
WELCOME, N.C. - Kerry Earnhardt can't keep his hand off the smooth finish of the black Chevrolet sitting in the garage at Richard Childress Racing. And the very sight of this combination - an Earnhardt, a black Chevy and a car owner named Richard Childress - is enough to generate both deja vu and anticipation. You see the name Earnhardt printed above the driver's-side window and the No. 33 on the car door and you look twice, to make sure it is 33 and not No. 3, the number made famous by the late seven-time Winston Cup champion Dale Earnhardt, who teamed with Childress for six of those titles.
SPORTS
By SANDRA McKEE | May 25, 2003
Robby Gordon. Remember when no one respected him, liked him or gave him a chance at being a successful big-time Winston Cup or Indy Car driver? He was too pigheaded - or hardheaded. He was too arrogant. Too much of a know-it-all. But today, Gordon goes into the Indianapolis 500 as the outside pole-sitter and a favorite to win the race. And when he has finished there, he'll head to Concord, N.C., to compete in the Coca-Cola 600. His chances of winning there aren't bad, either. When did Robby Gordon go from persona non grata to respected competitor?
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