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Richard Ben Cramer

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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 10, 2013
An old reporter often begins his daily routine by turning to the newspaper's obituary page with mild trepidation, fearing another friend has gone to that great newsroom in the sky. So it was this week in reading of the death in Baltimore, at only 62, of Richard Ben Cramer, arguably the best writer of a presidential campaign chronicle ever. That would be his 1,047-page opus of one of the less memorable contests, in 1988, among six less-than-heroic candidates: Republicans George H.W. Bush, the eventual winner, and Bob Dole; and Democrats Michael Dukakis, the eventual party nominee, Richard Gephardt, Joe Biden and Gary Hart.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
A memorial service for Richard Ben Cramer, 62, a former Baltimore Sun reporter, Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent and acclaimed biographer who died Jan. 7, will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday at Washington College's Gibson Center for the Arts in Chestertown. Gov. Martin O'Malley said Sunday he planned to attend the service, and had also ordered the State House flag in Annapolis to be flown at half mast. The governor called Mr. Cramer "a great American, great Marylander and a dear friend," and said in a statement that, “Richard's work as a gifted writer and deeply principled journalist made our republic a better place; made us a stronger, more compassionate, and more understanding people.
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FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2000
CHESTERTOWN - Here on the Eastern Shore, of all places, a different Joe DiMaggio has taken shape. He emerged from a small wooden house in a room furnished with a desk, computer, a few books, lots of files and one of those digital-age chairs that looks like a cross between a giant straw hat and a wire sculpture. Richard Ben Cramer sat in the chair for a few years of writing after a few years of reporting and has given new meaning to Paul Simon's lyric: "Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio?"
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 10, 2013
An old reporter often begins his daily routine by turning to the newspaper's obituary page with mild trepidation, fearing another friend has gone to that great newsroom in the sky. So it was this week in reading of the death in Baltimore, at only 62, of Richard Ben Cramer, arguably the best writer of a presidential campaign chronicle ever. That would be his 1,047-page opus of one of the less memorable contests, in 1988, among six less-than-heroic candidates: Republicans George H.W. Bush, the eventual winner, and Bob Dole; and Democrats Michael Dukakis, the eventual party nominee, Richard Gephardt, Joe Biden and Gary Hart.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael E. Waller and By Michael E. Waller,Sun Staff | October 22, 2000
"Joe DiMaggio, The Hero's Life," by Richard Ben Cramer. Simon & Schuster. 560 pages. $28. In 6,821 at bats in 13 years as a New York Yankee, Joe DiMaggio hit 361 home runs and struck out only 369 times, an awesome achievement recited repeatedly by knowledgeable baseball fans as the ultimate proof of his greatness. In his 84 years at the game of real life, DiMaggio hit few home runs and struck out countless times, a tragedy covered up for years by the DiMaggio Myth Machine. That's the core of Richard Ben Cramer's gripping character study, "Joe DiMaggio, The Hero's Life."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
A memorial service for Richard Ben Cramer, 62, a former Baltimore Sun reporter, Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent and acclaimed biographer who died Jan. 7, will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday at Washington College's Gibson Center for the Arts in Chestertown. Gov. Martin O'Malley said Sunday he planned to attend the service, and had also ordered the State House flag in Annapolis to be flown at half mast. The governor called Mr. Cramer "a great American, great Marylander and a dear friend," and said in a statement that, “Richard's work as a gifted writer and deeply principled journalist made our republic a better place; made us a stronger, more compassionate, and more understanding people.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 8, 2013
Richard Ben Cramer had the gift of a great writer: an agile mind that generated entertaining books and magazine articles in topics as disparate as Middle East politics and baseball. The Chestertown, Md., resident, who died Monday at age 62, "had raw talent for writing and reporting and was just so damn good," said Tom Horton, a former Baltimore Sun colleague said in an obituary. "He was born to be a journalist and a writer. " His books ranged from "Joe DiMaggio: The Hero's Life," a biography of the Yankee outfielder to "What It Takes: The Way to the White House, a look at the 1988 presidential campaign," to "How Israel Lost: The Four Questions," which wrestled with the decades-long conflict between the young country and Palestinians.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Richard Ben Cramer, a former Baltimore Sun reporter who later became a Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent for The Philadelphia Inquirer and an acclaimed author chronicling the lives of politicians and legendary sports figures, died Monday of lung cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Mr. Cramer, who was 62, lived in Chestertown. "Richard's work as a gifted writer and deeply principled journalist made our Republic a better place; made us a stronger, more compassionate, and more understanding people," Gov. Martin J. O'Malley, a friend, said in a statement released Tuesday.
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1998
Throw your best stuff, Richard Ben Cramer, you with the Pulitzer Prize and the big book contract. Bring on the face-high fastball, or maybe the wicked curve that always buckles their knees.This isn't covering the Afghanistan war, you know. This this isn't chasing presidential candidate Bob Dole -- "the Bobster," you tagged him -- through the snows of New Hampshire. This time you have taken on Joe DiMaggio, and the great DiMaggio never loses. You said so yourself."It didn't matter what game he was in, he was the best player on the field, and he was going to beat you somehow," Cramer says.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1996
Hear about this year's presidential campaign from the experts at Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus in a five-part course.This third annual media forum, on "Campaign '96: Candidates and the Issues," is a five-week series that looks at political issues. The series opens Wednesday with "Our Presidential Party," a viewing of the first presidential debate with Jeff Fager, "CBS Evening News" executive producer, and Benjamin Ginsberg, a political science professor and director of JHU's Washington Center for the Study of American Government.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Richard Ben Cramer, a former Baltimore Sun reporter who later became a Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent for The Philadelphia Inquirer and an acclaimed author chronicling the lives of politicians and legendary sports figures, died Monday of lung cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Mr. Cramer, who was 62, lived in Chestertown. "Richard's work as a gifted writer and deeply principled journalist made our Republic a better place; made us a stronger, more compassionate, and more understanding people," Gov. Martin J. O'Malley, a friend, said in a statement released Tuesday.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 8, 2013
Richard Ben Cramer had the gift of a great writer: an agile mind that generated entertaining books and magazine articles in topics as disparate as Middle East politics and baseball. The Chestertown, Md., resident, who died Monday at age 62, "had raw talent for writing and reporting and was just so damn good," said Tom Horton, a former Baltimore Sun colleague said in an obituary. "He was born to be a journalist and a writer. " His books ranged from "Joe DiMaggio: The Hero's Life," a biography of the Yankee outfielder to "What It Takes: The Way to the White House, a look at the 1988 presidential campaign," to "How Israel Lost: The Four Questions," which wrestled with the decades-long conflict between the young country and Palestinians.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael E. Waller and By Michael E. Waller,Sun Staff | October 22, 2000
"Joe DiMaggio, The Hero's Life," by Richard Ben Cramer. Simon & Schuster. 560 pages. $28. In 6,821 at bats in 13 years as a New York Yankee, Joe DiMaggio hit 361 home runs and struck out only 369 times, an awesome achievement recited repeatedly by knowledgeable baseball fans as the ultimate proof of his greatness. In his 84 years at the game of real life, DiMaggio hit few home runs and struck out countless times, a tragedy covered up for years by the DiMaggio Myth Machine. That's the core of Richard Ben Cramer's gripping character study, "Joe DiMaggio, The Hero's Life."
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2000
CHESTERTOWN - Here on the Eastern Shore, of all places, a different Joe DiMaggio has taken shape. He emerged from a small wooden house in a room furnished with a desk, computer, a few books, lots of files and one of those digital-age chairs that looks like a cross between a giant straw hat and a wire sculpture. Richard Ben Cramer sat in the chair for a few years of writing after a few years of reporting and has given new meaning to Paul Simon's lyric: "Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio?"
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1998
Throw your best stuff, Richard Ben Cramer, you with the Pulitzer Prize and the big book contract. Bring on the face-high fastball, or maybe the wicked curve that always buckles their knees.This isn't covering the Afghanistan war, you know. This this isn't chasing presidential candidate Bob Dole -- "the Bobster," you tagged him -- through the snows of New Hampshire. This time you have taken on Joe DiMaggio, and the great DiMaggio never loses. You said so yourself."It didn't matter what game he was in, he was the best player on the field, and he was going to beat you somehow," Cramer says.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | September 21, 1992
In a harmonic literary convergence, over 330 writers on campuses and in cafes across the country will read from their work tomorrow to raise money and awareness in the battle against hunger, homelessness and illiteracy."
FEATURES
January 4, 2002
Five Maryland journalists, including three Sun reporters, will be honored at a public ceremony Sunday for their writing in the arts and humanities. The Emmart Memorial Award was established 27 years ago by friends and admirers of A.D. Emmart, an associate editor of the Sunpapers, after his death. Emmart a reporter, foreign correspondent, editorial writer and arts critic for The Sun. He was also editorial page editor of the Evening Sun. The award recognizes distinguished examples of journalism in the humanities from general-readership publications in Maryland.
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