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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 2, 2004
Richard Avedon, the New York photographer whose signature pictures of glamorous models romping in high couture clothing revolutionized the fashion industry and helped set American style for more than five decades, died yesterday. He was 81. Avedon, who during his long career worked for such trendy magazines as Vogue, Harper's Bazaar and The New Yorker, died at Methodist Hospital in San Antonio, Texas, after suffering a brain hemorrhage last month while on assignment. He had been working on a project for The New Yorker called "On Democracy," which had taken him around the country for several months shooting politicians, delegates and ordinary people along the campaign trail.
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By LAURA VOZZELLA and LAURA VOZZELLA,laura.vizzella@baltsun.com | January 7, 2009
In the middle of a soggy Washington spectacle, there stood Kurt Schmoke, steady legal hand and umbrella-holder. The former Baltimore mayor and current Howard University Law School dean is part of the legal team representing Roland Burris, the man who claims to be Illinois' junior senator but has so far failed to convince the secretary of the Senate, who rejected his credentials yesterday. Having not been seated, Burris opted to stand - in front of reporters, outside the Capitol, in the rain.
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FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 9, 1993
WASHINGTON -- From postmaster to president, photographer Richard Avedon has enjoyed a brilliant career capturing the familiar and sometimes not so memorable faces of this country's recent political history.On an assignment for Rolling Stone magazine in 1976, Mr. Avedon set out to photograph the candidates running for the nation's highest office in the first post-Watergate election.He didn't stop with Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter, however. It soon included policy shapers from migrant farm fields to Capitol Hill.
NEWS
By Tim Swift | September 7, 2008
JAZZ "Soul Progressin'": by Lafayette Gilchrist: Taking inspiration from hip-hop, funk and soul, the Baltimore-based jazz pianist has been steadily earning a name for himself nationally. Entertainment Weekly called him "the heir to Thelonious Monk," and many others regard him as one of jazz music's rising young stars. He continues to live up to the hype with his new high-energy album Soul Progressin'. Out Tuesday, the CD will be followed by a series of live shows including one Saturday at the Creative Alliance.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | September 30, 2007
FUNNY FACE 50th ANNIVERSARY EDITION Paramount / $14.99 Funny Face offers an object lesson in beauty, class and charisma, courtesy of an actress who had all three in abundance. Already in 1957, at age 24 and with just three major films behind her, Audrey Hepburn was a Hollywood original, a glamorous pixie who somehow retained a regal bearing that engendered respect and a gaminelike quality that made men and women alike adore her. Paired here with Fred Astaire, she plays a beatnik-ish bookstore clerk who, reluctantly, becomes the new face of a fashion line.
NEWS
By Tim Swift | September 7, 2008
JAZZ "Soul Progressin'": by Lafayette Gilchrist: Taking inspiration from hip-hop, funk and soul, the Baltimore-based jazz pianist has been steadily earning a name for himself nationally. Entertainment Weekly called him "the heir to Thelonious Monk," and many others regard him as one of jazz music's rising young stars. He continues to live up to the hype with his new high-energy album Soul Progressin'. Out Tuesday, the CD will be followed by a series of live shows including one Saturday at the Creative Alliance.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA and LAURA VOZZELLA,laura.vizzella@baltsun.com | January 7, 2009
In the middle of a soggy Washington spectacle, there stood Kurt Schmoke, steady legal hand and umbrella-holder. The former Baltimore mayor and current Howard University Law School dean is part of the legal team representing Roland Burris, the man who claims to be Illinois' junior senator but has so far failed to convince the secretary of the Senate, who rejected his credentials yesterday. Having not been seated, Burris opted to stand - in front of reporters, outside the Capitol, in the rain.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 1999
Dogfish dudeSam Calagione isn't known for his wardrobe. He's known for his beer.The founder of Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, makers of popular Delaware craft beers, usually wears nothing fancier than a dirty T-shirt, khakis and a pair of low-top Chuck Taylors to work at his brew pub in Rehoboth Beach and his microbrewery in Lewes.So the fact that Calagione (left) appears in a national advertising campaign for Slates clothing shot by famed fashion photographer Richard Avedon certainly seems like a leap, especially to Calagione.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | July 3, 1994
We are all top fashion models! A hundred years ago, Walt Whitman claimed that the very ordinariness of people made them part of the "divine average." Twenty-odd years ago, Andy Warhol, master of numb mediocrity, could predict that someday advances in the media would mean that everyone would have 15 minutes of fame -- which is, of course, worse than oblivion.But Richard Avedon, perhaps the greatest contemporary American photographer, knows that we are all top fashion models. We are not average.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | December 12, 1993
This is the year of crafts. Unless it's the year of California wine. Or the year of celebrity photography, baseball nostalgia or the book made into a movie made into a book about the making of the movie.A case could be made for any of those titles, from the looks of this year's gift books -- those lavish, expensive tomes so easily wrapped and beribboned and placed under the tree en route to the coffee table. Here are some that caught our eye from the tonnage published in time for the holidays.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | September 30, 2007
FUNNY FACE 50th ANNIVERSARY EDITION Paramount / $14.99 Funny Face offers an object lesson in beauty, class and charisma, courtesy of an actress who had all three in abundance. Already in 1957, at age 24 and with just three major films behind her, Audrey Hepburn was a Hollywood original, a glamorous pixie who somehow retained a regal bearing that engendered respect and a gaminelike quality that made men and women alike adore her. Paired here with Fred Astaire, she plays a beatnik-ish bookstore clerk who, reluctantly, becomes the new face of a fashion line.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 2, 2004
Richard Avedon, the New York photographer whose signature pictures of glamorous models romping in high couture clothing revolutionized the fashion industry and helped set American style for more than five decades, died yesterday. He was 81. Avedon, who during his long career worked for such trendy magazines as Vogue, Harper's Bazaar and The New Yorker, died at Methodist Hospital in San Antonio, Texas, after suffering a brain hemorrhage last month while on assignment. He had been working on a project for The New Yorker called "On Democracy," which had taken him around the country for several months shooting politicians, delegates and ordinary people along the campaign trail.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 1999
Dogfish dudeSam Calagione isn't known for his wardrobe. He's known for his beer.The founder of Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, makers of popular Delaware craft beers, usually wears nothing fancier than a dirty T-shirt, khakis and a pair of low-top Chuck Taylors to work at his brew pub in Rehoboth Beach and his microbrewery in Lewes.So the fact that Calagione (left) appears in a national advertising campaign for Slates clothing shot by famed fashion photographer Richard Avedon certainly seems like a leap, especially to Calagione.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | July 3, 1994
We are all top fashion models! A hundred years ago, Walt Whitman claimed that the very ordinariness of people made them part of the "divine average." Twenty-odd years ago, Andy Warhol, master of numb mediocrity, could predict that someday advances in the media would mean that everyone would have 15 minutes of fame -- which is, of course, worse than oblivion.But Richard Avedon, perhaps the greatest contemporary American photographer, knows that we are all top fashion models. We are not average.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | December 12, 1993
This is the year of crafts. Unless it's the year of California wine. Or the year of celebrity photography, baseball nostalgia or the book made into a movie made into a book about the making of the movie.A case could be made for any of those titles, from the looks of this year's gift books -- those lavish, expensive tomes so easily wrapped and beribboned and placed under the tree en route to the coffee table. Here are some that caught our eye from the tonnage published in time for the holidays.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 9, 1993
WASHINGTON -- From postmaster to president, photographer Richard Avedon has enjoyed a brilliant career capturing the familiar and sometimes not so memorable faces of this country's recent political history.On an assignment for Rolling Stone magazine in 1976, Mr. Avedon set out to photograph the candidates running for the nation's highest office in the first post-Watergate election.He didn't stop with Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter, however. It soon included policy shapers from migrant farm fields to Capitol Hill.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | October 13, 2007
Leave aside for the moment whether Annie Leibovitz is a great artist and focus instead on what she undoubtedly is: a terrific celebrity portrait photographer - maybe, in the post-Richard Avedon era, the best there is. After seeing Annie Leibovitz: A Photographer's Life, 1990-2005, the 15-year retrospective of Leibovitz's commercial and personal work that opens today at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, I've got to confess I'm tired of hearing people...
TRAVEL
October 19, 2008
Corcoran Gallery of Art Where:: 500 17th St. N.W., Washington When:: Through Jan. 25 What:: Richard Avedon: Portraits of Power. Exhibit shows the artist's work on the subjects of politics and power. Composed of more than 200 images of government, media, business and labor officials, along with photographs of artists, activists and ordinary citizens caught up in national debates. How much: : Tickets are $14, $12 for seniors and military members, $10 for students with ID. Free for museum members and children ages 6 and younger.
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