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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2013
This is the kind of thing that all too often makes it so aggravating to watch the Baltimore Ravens when CBS is doing the telecast. It was late in the third quarter Sunday and a ferocious pass rush by the Ravens resulted in a sack of Cleveland Browns quarterback Brandon Weeden. As the linemen were unpiling with 29 seconds left in the quarter, a graphic flashed on the bottom of the screen that read, “Ravens: 4 sacks for 28 yards.” Two seconds later, play-by-play announcer Marv Albert told viewers, “A total of three sacks now for the Ravens.” Come on, Marv.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2013
It doesn't happen often, but in Sunday's game, the guys in the CBS broadcast booth got it mostly right in their "keys to the game" talking points just before kickoff. Give them credit for that in their call of the Ravens' 26-23 victory over the Miami Dolphins. “Gone are Ray Lewis, Ed Reed and other key members of the Ravens defensive unit,” play-by-play announcer Marv Albert said. “The question is: what can Baltimore do against a Miami offensive line that has really struggled ... allowing 18 sacks ... a league high?
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SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2001
OAKLAND, Calif. - Ravens defensive tackle Tony Siragusa is stunned that after 19 games this season, teams still haven't learned. Attempting to run the ball on the Ravens is a fruitless venture. Yet teams still try, and Siragusa expects the New York Giants, who will face the Ravens in Super Bowl XXXV, will try to establish the run also. "Everybody [tries to run], which amazes me," Siragusa said. "Why you going to try and run on us? You can't run the ball on us. I mean, how many weeks are we into the season?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2013
This is the kind of thing that all too often makes it so aggravating to watch the Baltimore Ravens when CBS is doing the telecast. It was late in the third quarter Sunday and a ferocious pass rush by the Ravens resulted in a sack of Cleveland Browns quarterback Brandon Weeden. As the linemen were unpiling with 29 seconds left in the quarter, a graphic flashed on the bottom of the screen that read, “Ravens: 4 sacks for 28 yards.” Two seconds later, play-by-play announcer Marv Albert told viewers, “A total of three sacks now for the Ravens.” Come on, Marv.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2003
SAN DIEGO - The NFL's best bodyguards sometimes need protection from one another. Whether it's squabbling over food or arguing about the best seat in the meeting room, the Oakland Raiders' offensive line is a clash of attitudes off the field. But put a bunch of pass rushers in front of these Raiders and they jell to form a 1,600-pound wall. "We're sort of like a dysfunctional family," right tackle Lincoln Kennedy said. "Aside from game day, we can't get along with each other. We're fighting like little brothers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
I cannot remember watching a football telecast and learning less than I did from the CBS crew Sunday in the Baltimore Ravens 25-15 win over the Cleveland Browns. And the reason for that is simple: Rich Gannon is almost as lazy in his commitment to explaining what's happening on the field as my other favorite CBS Sports analyst, Dan Dierdorf. In fairness, Gannon didn't have stretches where he seemed to be asleep or totally out of it as Dierdorf does, but I can't think of anyone in any booth covering football, or baseball or basketball, for that matter, who seemed less interested in taking me inside the game than Gannon was with the Ravens on Sunday.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2003
OAKLAND, Calif. - As the Tennessee Titans attempt to pull off the improbable, the Oakland Raiders will try to hold off the inevitable. An aging roster and a pending salary cap purge have become sources of motivation - and perhaps desperation - for the favored Raiders heading into today's AFC championship game at Network Associates Coliseum. Having the oldest team in the league as well as looking at a record $50 million over next season's cap, Oakland knows it will either make history or become history.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2000
Rich Gannon has gone from out of football to the top of the sport. The Oakland Raiders journeyman quarterback has finally found a home after 12 years in the league, turning around a once-storied franchise as well as his career. In 1994, Gannon was out of the league and at his home in Minnesota, building a toy train layout in his basement and shoveling snow. Six seasons later, he has propelled the Raiders to an 11-4 record and their first playoff berth since 1993. Why has Gannon, after twice being traded and twice cast adrift, become a leading candidate for NFL Most Valuable Player?
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
SAN DIEGO -- Dogged perseverance will be rewarded tonight. The only question is whose. Will Super Bowl XXXVII be the fulfillment of Rich Gannon's 14-year odyssey, spanning five NFL teams and countless crossroads? Or will it be the culmination of Brad Johnson's nine-year journey through the same jungle with three different teams and a similar number of tribulations? Two quarterbacks, one ring. Destiny waits for one of them at Qualcomm Stadium, where the Oakland Raiders, led by Gannon, chase their fourth Super Bowl championship, and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, led by Johnson, seek their first.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
Maybe there is a TV Santa Claus. CBS Sports televised the Baltimore Ravens against the Cleveland Browns on Christmas Eve, and the network didn't force local viewers to endure Greg Gumbel and Dan Dierdorf in the booth. Happy holidays to you, too, Sean McManus, former Baltimore resident and current president of CBS Sports. Thanks for having a little mercy on us. I'm not saying the broadcast team CBS gave us, Spero Dedes and Rich Gannon, was great guns. But it was better than we have been getting lately on the home of “Hawaii Five-O” and the 10,000 other prime-time shows I saw endless promos for on Saturday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
I cannot remember watching a football telecast and learning less than I did from the CBS crew Sunday in the Baltimore Ravens 25-15 win over the Cleveland Browns. And the reason for that is simple: Rich Gannon is almost as lazy in his commitment to explaining what's happening on the field as my other favorite CBS Sports analyst, Dan Dierdorf. In fairness, Gannon didn't have stretches where he seemed to be asleep or totally out of it as Dierdorf does, but I can't think of anyone in any booth covering football, or baseball or basketball, for that matter, who seemed less interested in taking me inside the game than Gannon was with the Ravens on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
Maybe there is a TV Santa Claus. CBS Sports televised the Baltimore Ravens against the Cleveland Browns on Christmas Eve, and the network didn't force local viewers to endure Greg Gumbel and Dan Dierdorf in the booth. Happy holidays to you, too, Sean McManus, former Baltimore resident and current president of CBS Sports. Thanks for having a little mercy on us. I'm not saying the broadcast team CBS gave us, Spero Dedes and Rich Gannon, was great guns. But it was better than we have been getting lately on the home of “Hawaii Five-O” and the 10,000 other prime-time shows I saw endless promos for on Saturday afternoon.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
SAN DIEGO -- Dogged perseverance will be rewarded tonight. The only question is whose. Will Super Bowl XXXVII be the fulfillment of Rich Gannon's 14-year odyssey, spanning five NFL teams and countless crossroads? Or will it be the culmination of Brad Johnson's nine-year journey through the same jungle with three different teams and a similar number of tribulations? Two quarterbacks, one ring. Destiny waits for one of them at Qualcomm Stadium, where the Oakland Raiders, led by Gannon, chase their fourth Super Bowl championship, and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, led by Johnson, seek their first.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2003
SAN DIEGO - The NFL's best bodyguards sometimes need protection from one another. Whether it's squabbling over food or arguing about the best seat in the meeting room, the Oakland Raiders' offensive line is a clash of attitudes off the field. But put a bunch of pass rushers in front of these Raiders and they jell to form a 1,600-pound wall. "We're sort of like a dysfunctional family," right tackle Lincoln Kennedy said. "Aside from game day, we can't get along with each other. We're fighting like little brothers.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2003
OAKLAND, Calif. - As the Tennessee Titans attempt to pull off the improbable, the Oakland Raiders will try to hold off the inevitable. An aging roster and a pending salary cap purge have become sources of motivation - and perhaps desperation - for the favored Raiders heading into today's AFC championship game at Network Associates Coliseum. Having the oldest team in the league as well as looking at a record $50 million over next season's cap, Oakland knows it will either make history or become history.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2001
OAKLAND, Calif. - Ravens defensive tackle Tony Siragusa is stunned that after 19 games this season, teams still haven't learned. Attempting to run the ball on the Ravens is a fruitless venture. Yet teams still try, and Siragusa expects the New York Giants, who will face the Ravens in Super Bowl XXXV, will try to establish the run also. "Everybody [tries to run], which amazes me," Siragusa said. "Why you going to try and run on us? You can't run the ball on us. I mean, how many weeks are we into the season?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2013
It doesn't happen often, but in Sunday's game, the guys in the CBS broadcast booth got it mostly right in their "keys to the game" talking points just before kickoff. Give them credit for that in their call of the Ravens' 26-23 victory over the Miami Dolphins. “Gone are Ray Lewis, Ed Reed and other key members of the Ravens defensive unit,” play-by-play announcer Marv Albert said. “The question is: what can Baltimore do against a Miami offensive line that has really struggled ... allowing 18 sacks ... a league high?
SPORTS
October 27, 2002
The number 5 Consecutive 300-yard passing games by Raiders QB Rich Gannon The quote "It's coming for all of us. I'm going to be a pitiful man when that day comes for me. I'm going to go kicking and screaming." Eagles defensive end Hugh Douglas, after veteran Michael Sinclair was released last week
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2000
Rich Gannon has gone from out of football to the top of the sport. The Oakland Raiders journeyman quarterback has finally found a home after 12 years in the league, turning around a once-storied franchise as well as his career. In 1994, Gannon was out of the league and at his home in Minnesota, building a toy train layout in his basement and shoveling snow. Six seasons later, he has propelled the Raiders to an 11-4 record and their first playoff berth since 1993. Why has Gannon, after twice being traded and twice cast adrift, become a leading candidate for NFL Most Valuable Player?
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