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NEWS
October 15, 1990
If "budget is policy," as the Nixon era's Roy Ash used to say, then taxes are raw, rough politics. There is plenty of the latter in the continuing struggle for a deficit-cutting package before the Nov. 6 general election. Incumbents are fearful of a voter backlash that could terminate their careers and harm their respective parties.Because there are more Democrats than Republicans in Congress, Democrats have long been worried they have the most to lose in wide-scale public revulsion to government gridlock.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Adam Marton, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
Baltimore health officials have been staring at a daunting statistic for years: life expectancy in the richest neighborhoods is 20 years longer than in the poorest ones. But a plan unveiled recently aims to battle the intractable health problems causing the gap, including high rates of HIV infection, heart disease and violence.   An interactive map  created by The Baltimore Sun using city data illustrates many of the stark differences between city neighborhoods:   The median income for Roland Park is 90,000 while in Upton it is 13,000.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Despite a growing economy, another 1.3 million people fell below the poverty line last year and the economic divide between rich and poor Americans continued to swell unexpectedly, according to the Census Bureau.Altogether, 39.3 million Americans, or 15.1 percent of the population, lived in poverty in 1993, up from 14.8 percent in 1992 and the highest rate since 1983, when the economy was emerging from its deepest recession since World War II.Maryland fared better than many states.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 28, 2012
The shad, America's founding fish, has started its annual run up the Chesapeake Bay and into the Susquehanna River, and here in Maryland, Land of Pleasant Living, there's been a run of foolish facts, too. My email box has been full of them lately, a sudden spring run stirred to life by recent columns on Maryland's many millionaires and the wild idea that they should pay income taxes at a higher rate than the rest of us. "Your commentary this...
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Staff Writer | November 8, 1993
PETIONVILLE, Haiti -- This place high on a mountainside overlooking Port-au-Prince is one of the few communities shared by Haiti's rich and poor. Still, they hardly meet.Beautiful mansions dominate the view, while ramshackle huts cling to the sides of the cliffs below. Maseratis and BMWs race through crowded, smelly street markets. Fancy restaurants and modern supermarkets share the same blocks with vendors selling stale food on the sidewalks.For fun, people like Katie, an interior decorator, spend evenings with friends at a neighborhood casino.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | November 7, 1990
IN 1983, I wrote an article for the Atlantic Monthly titled "The Declining Middle." My subject was the increasing evidence that America's middle class was fragmenting into a society of the rich and the poor.There was no single cause. Rather, the reasons included everything from the new global economy -- which put American factory workers under pressure from cheap foreign labor -- to the rise of a poorly paid service economy, demographic changes in the work force, deregulation, anti-unionism and shifts in federal taxing and spending policies.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 2000
DAVOS, Switzerland -- Amid a sudden wave of angst among corporate and political leaders about the growing gap between rich and poor, President Clinton appealed to them yesterday to make global trade work for the poor. In what amounted to his gospel on globalization, Clinton told an audience of chief executives and national leaders attending the World Economic Forum that if the economic elite who had created, managed and benefited from globalization did not listen to the concerns of those left out, protectionism would return.
NEWS
By Shibley Telhami | March 5, 2002
WASHINGTON - The story was heart-warming: A 30-year-old woman gave birth to a baby free of her family's curse of early Alzheimer's disease, thanks to the wonders of medical science. It was hard not to feel the joy of the baby's family, or the hope of the many others who feel helpless by their genetic inheritance. The breakthrough occurred when doctors in Chicago applied genetic tests to batches of human eggs, helping the woman to have a baby free of her family's early Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 7, 1995
COPENHAGEN, Denmark -- U.N. Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali called for action yesterday to close the ever-widening gap between the world's rich and poor, but he acknowledged that donor countries are suffering from aid "fatigue" that could take years to overcome.Mr. Boutros-Ghali spoke at the opening of the United Nations' seven-day World Summit on Social Development, called to address problems arising from poverty and discrimination.James Gustave Speth, head of the U.N. Development Program, outlined some of the dimensions of the global poverty problem.
NEWS
June 6, 1993
In constructing his 22-member commission to study state aid to education, Gov. William Donald Schaefer has wisely picked a panel that can get something passed in an election year. The real question is whether it can get something passed that will truly make a difference.The commission, which will report this fall for action by the 1994 legislature, is chaired by Donald P. Hutchinson. As president of the state Chamber of Commerce and as a former Baltimore County executive and state senator, Mr. Hutchinson is familiar with the needs of many constituencies.
NEWS
February 13, 2012
For the fourth year in a row, Maryland students have topped the nation in the proportion of high school graduates who successfully passed the rigorous Advanced Placement exams, leaping even further ahead of other top states. Twenty-nine percent of last year's class passed at least one AP test, compared to the national average of 18 percent. Maryland's pass rate is double what it was a decade ago. The results suggest that the state's commitment to investing in education over recent years is paying off in bumper crops of students with the kind of advanced, high-level academic skills the state will need to compete successfully in a 21 s t -century knowledge-based global economy, and that's all to the good.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
Deverick Howell could only stare at the television as Ravens kicker Billy Cundiff's last-chance field goal attempt hooked left of the uprights, dealing the team and its fans a heartbreaking 23-20 loss Sunday to the New England Patriots. "I feel angry and disappointed," said Howell, who had worn his purple sneakers and loudly cheered the team on with fellow residents of Christopher Place, a residence for 60 formerly homeless men at the Our Daily Bread Employment Center on Fallsway. Howell probably spoke for fans across the region who were itching for the team to return to the Super Bowl for the first time in 11 years.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | March 24, 2009
The decision by JPMorgan Chase to proceed with plans to spend $138 million on new jets and a hangar to house them, as ABC News reported Monday, fits right into my theory about why the corporate rich continue to indulge and reward themselves despite a public uproar amid financial crisis. Same with the now-shelved plan at Constellation Energy Group to reward executives with about $32 million in performance benefits and retention incentives - I have a pretty good idea why such a feast had been arranged despite the company's near-bankruptcy, its layoff of some 800 employees and its demand for more money from electric customers.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 11, 2007
ASMARA, Eritrea -- A rhythmic clamor of pounding hammers, buzzing grinders and clanging metal reverberates from the stone gateway of Eritrea's oldest open-air market. At first glance, the dusty bazaar behind downtown Asmara appears to be little more than a junkyard of rusted car parts, broken appliances and scraps of steel. But this isn't where old metal comes to die. It comes here to be reborn. Used artillery shells are recast as combs for beauty salons. Empty vegetable-oil tins morph into coffee pots.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | September 1, 2006
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke told Congress in July that he is disturbed by the growing chasm between the rich and the poor and wants everyone to be able to pursue "the American dream." The dream of greater prosperity has bypassed his hometown of Dillon, S.C., which is honoring its native son with Ben Bernanke Day today, seven months after he took charge of the Fed. In June, Dillon County's unemployment rate was 9.7 percent, more than twice the national average of 4.6 percent that month, according to the U.S. Labor Department.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. declared yesterday that "no person in this country - no matter how high or powerful - is above the law," as the Senate opened confirmation hearings expected to focus heavily on the scope of presidential power and the secret domestic eavesdropping operation at the National Security Agency. Alito's remarks before the Senate Judiciary Committee were his first substantive public comments since President Bush chose him to replace retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor more than two months ago. The federal appeals court judge from New Jersey talked about what he had learned from his family, his tenure as a government lawyer and from judicial colleagues.
NEWS
June 22, 1993
Do we detect a whiff of political positioning in Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's decision not to sue the state over inadequate school funds? Is Mr. Schmoke edging ever-closer to running for governor? Or do these smoke signals indicate the mayor simply wants to cut the best deal for Baltimore City on increased state support for city schools?Both options might be part of the mayor's strategy. By shelving the lawsuit, Mr. Schmoke clears the deck of a potential hazard to his gubernatorial ambitions. When the mayor said last year he wanted the courts to order the state to spend more money on poor school districts, he generated tremendous animus in influential Montgomery County, the state's biggest and wealthiest subdivision.
NEWS
December 27, 1994
How does a frail 90-year-old with no official title cling to all-embracing political power? One way, as detailed by Ian Johnson, The Sun's Beijing correspondent, is to enforceretirement at 70 in the private sector. Especially in the unauthorized religious sector.The incident of goons rising in the capital city's largest Protestant church during service in front of a full congregation and unceremoniously dumping the pastor outside, because of the Rev. Yang Yudong's 73 years, is simply part of a larger campaign against Christian, Muslim, Taoist and Buddhist worship that is flourishing outside the state-created "patriotic" churches.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2003
An escape hatch that lawmakers inserted in an expensive school funding plan is almost certainly illegal, Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said yesterday, a finding that makes it more difficult for the state to back out of a $1.3 billion-a-year education program that no one can agree how to pay for. Curran told lawmakers that a vote they are required to take in March - a resolution affirming or denying that Maryland has enough money to pay for the...
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 13, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The fluorescent light flicked off. The primitive air conditioner squealed to a halt. The 113-degree heat of late morning began pouring into the cinderblock house like water gushing into a damaged submarine. Muhammed Abdul al Sudani, the night watchman who lives in the one-room house at the Fatima Elementary School, didn't find it worth complaining about. "It's a hard situation," he said. "But now that Saddam has fallen, it's OK. We can wait for the future now." A mile away, in a sand-colored mansion on the banks of the Tigris River, Omar Achmad al Ibrahim pointed to his 70,000-volt generator.
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