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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | December 29, 1993
Nina Simonds' new "China Express" cookbook is filled with vibrant and healthy flavors of the Orient taken to the fast lane. Influenced by the many years she's spent in the Orient, the acclaimed authority on Chinese cuisine has approached its dishes with her Western sensibility. The angle is fresh, the approach is health-conscious, and most ingredients are found as staples in your kitchen and certainly in your supermarket.Crab with broccoli is a contemporary recipe that can be prepared and cooked in well under 20 minutes and uses a very minimum amount of fat. Trading fat for flavor is very doable in Asian cooking, if you are aware of the recipe's contents and learn a few tricks.
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By Donna Ellis | September 21, 2011
Vinegar is one of humanity's oldest condiments, and when it comes to mealtimes, it can be among the home cook's best friends. Vinegar is made by acetic fermentation, a process that basically converts alcohol into acid. Most countries produce their own vinegars, typically based on the most popular alcohol there. So, France and Italy produce wine vinegars. Spain brings you sherry vinegar. Asians distill rice wine (e.g. sake) vinegar, while Great Britain creates vinegar from beer (malt vinegar)
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By Charlyne Varkonyi | February 13, 1991
Kathy Gunst, author of "Leftovers" (HarperCollins, $25), says a well-stocked pantry is the key to turning leftovers into fine food. She suggests the following staples to keep on hand, but points out they are just a guideline. "You don't have to bDijon mustard or Chinese rice wine the next. But I certainly am not saying that if you don't have all the things in your pantry you can't use the book."*Butter -- preferably unsalted.*Canned and bottled foods -- red and white kidney beans, chick peas, capers, chutney, cornichons, horseradish, mayonnaise, mustard, pimiento, salsa, Tabasco, tahini (sesame paste)
NEWS
By Doug Oster and Doug Oster,Tribune Media Services | May 21, 2008
The flavor of garlic is essential for the kitchen, beloved by cooks and gardeners alike. But you don't have to grow garlic to reap its taste fresh from your garden. There's an easy-to-cultivate plant - Chinese chive - that resembles other members of the onion family but offers that mild garlic flavor and doesn't produce a bulb. Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum) has many common names, including garlic chive, Chinese leek and, in Japan, nira. It's been used for centuries in Asian cooking, but can add something different to Western dishes, too. It's flat-leafed and has a beautiful white flower that comes up about a month after the first tender green shoots.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 18, 2007
Today marks the beginning of the Chinese New Year celebration, and won tons are often part of the feast. This recipe is adapted from My Grandmother's Chinese Kitchen by Eileen Yin-Fei Lo. Chinese red rice vinegar and Chinese white rice wine are available at Asian markets. There's a big difference among brands of won ton skins; two we recommend are Fung's Village (extra thin) and Wing Hing brands. WON TONS Total time: About 1 hour, 30 minutes, plus 4 hours chilling time Makes about 36 won tons 3/4 pound lean ground pork 1/4 pound shrimp (about 8 large shrimp)
NEWS
By Doug Oster and Doug Oster,Tribune Media Services | May 21, 2008
The flavor of garlic is essential for the kitchen, beloved by cooks and gardeners alike. But you don't have to grow garlic to reap its taste fresh from your garden. There's an easy-to-cultivate plant - Chinese chive - that resembles other members of the onion family but offers that mild garlic flavor and doesn't produce a bulb. Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum) has many common names, including garlic chive, Chinese leek and, in Japan, nira. It's been used for centuries in Asian cooking, but can add something different to Western dishes, too. It's flat-leafed and has a beautiful white flower that comes up about a month after the first tender green shoots.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 21, 2001
Occasionally, when I invite friends for dinner, a guest will remind me (in a polite but insistent manner) that he or she is on a low-fat diet. The strong, assertive flavors and interesting textures of Artic Char with Bok Choy, Garlic and Ginger meets these criteria. The delectable bok choy, still somewhat crisp, made a fine garnish for the tender, flaky arctic char fillets imbued with the salty taste of soy and complemented by the mild acidity of rice vinegar. To accompany this entree, you could serve rice drizzled with toasted sesame oil and sprinkled with chives and offer poached pears scented with fragrant spices for dessert.
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 2001
Han Sung Restaurant on St. Johns Lane in Ellicott City serves up Korean and Japanese cuisine. "Why Korean and Japanese? We've got experience with Japanese cuisine - my husband is a Sushi chef - and we're Korean," says Sue Kang. The menu offers a mix of dishes. "Our menu is pretty small," Kang said. However, she and her husband, Choong Mo, "try to make everything special. We try to make everything the way we would for our family." Among the Japanese offerings is the sushi bar. There's also the Japanese-style lunch boxes.
NEWS
By ANDREW LAM | May 2, 1995
San Francisco. -- Twenty years after my family fled Vietnam, I still miss those humid nights when as a child I lay awake waiting for the B-52 bombs to reverberate from some distant hillside. Ka-boomb, ka-boomb -- the sounds would roll across the city, like heart beats, strangely soothing. Ka-boomb, ka-boomb -- they told me how far away the bombs had fallen and, reassured, I would fall asleep mistaking the bombs for lullabies.I miss the smell of upturned earth and the thick dark winds that came before the rain, sending the white bed sheets and mother's silk ao dai dresses fluttering like angry ghosts caught on the clothes line.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | September 21, 2011
Vinegar is one of humanity's oldest condiments, and when it comes to mealtimes, it can be among the home cook's best friends. Vinegar is made by acetic fermentation, a process that basically converts alcohol into acid. Most countries produce their own vinegars, typically based on the most popular alcohol there. So, France and Italy produce wine vinegars. Spain brings you sherry vinegar. Asians distill rice wine (e.g. sake) vinegar, while Great Britain creates vinegar from beer (malt vinegar)
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 18, 2007
Today marks the beginning of the Chinese New Year celebration, and won tons are often part of the feast. This recipe is adapted from My Grandmother's Chinese Kitchen by Eileen Yin-Fei Lo. Chinese red rice vinegar and Chinese white rice wine are available at Asian markets. There's a big difference among brands of won ton skins; two we recommend are Fung's Village (extra thin) and Wing Hing brands. WON TONS Total time: About 1 hour, 30 minutes, plus 4 hours chilling time Makes about 36 won tons 3/4 pound lean ground pork 1/4 pound shrimp (about 8 large shrimp)
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 2001
Han Sung Restaurant on St. Johns Lane in Ellicott City serves up Korean and Japanese cuisine. "Why Korean and Japanese? We've got experience with Japanese cuisine - my husband is a Sushi chef - and we're Korean," says Sue Kang. The menu offers a mix of dishes. "Our menu is pretty small," Kang said. However, she and her husband, Choong Mo, "try to make everything special. We try to make everything the way we would for our family." Among the Japanese offerings is the sushi bar. There's also the Japanese-style lunch boxes.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 21, 2001
Occasionally, when I invite friends for dinner, a guest will remind me (in a polite but insistent manner) that he or she is on a low-fat diet. The strong, assertive flavors and interesting textures of Artic Char with Bok Choy, Garlic and Ginger meets these criteria. The delectable bok choy, still somewhat crisp, made a fine garnish for the tender, flaky arctic char fillets imbued with the salty taste of soy and complemented by the mild acidity of rice vinegar. To accompany this entree, you could serve rice drizzled with toasted sesame oil and sprinkled with chives and offer poached pears scented with fragrant spices for dessert.
NEWS
By ANDREW LAM | May 2, 1995
San Francisco. -- Twenty years after my family fled Vietnam, I still miss those humid nights when as a child I lay awake waiting for the B-52 bombs to reverberate from some distant hillside. Ka-boomb, ka-boomb -- the sounds would roll across the city, like heart beats, strangely soothing. Ka-boomb, ka-boomb -- they told me how far away the bombs had fallen and, reassured, I would fall asleep mistaking the bombs for lullabies.I miss the smell of upturned earth and the thick dark winds that came before the rain, sending the white bed sheets and mother's silk ao dai dresses fluttering like angry ghosts caught on the clothes line.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | December 29, 1993
Nina Simonds' new "China Express" cookbook is filled with vibrant and healthy flavors of the Orient taken to the fast lane. Influenced by the many years she's spent in the Orient, the acclaimed authority on Chinese cuisine has approached its dishes with her Western sensibility. The angle is fresh, the approach is health-conscious, and most ingredients are found as staples in your kitchen and certainly in your supermarket.Crab with broccoli is a contemporary recipe that can be prepared and cooked in well under 20 minutes and uses a very minimum amount of fat. Trading fat for flavor is very doable in Asian cooking, if you are aware of the recipe's contents and learn a few tricks.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | February 13, 1991
Kathy Gunst, author of "Leftovers" (HarperCollins, $25), says a well-stocked pantry is the key to turning leftovers into fine food. She suggests the following staples to keep on hand, but points out they are just a guideline. "You don't have to bDijon mustard or Chinese rice wine the next. But I certainly am not saying that if you don't have all the things in your pantry you can't use the book."*Butter -- preferably unsalted.*Canned and bottled foods -- red and white kidney beans, chick peas, capers, chutney, cornichons, horseradish, mayonnaise, mustard, pimiento, salsa, Tabasco, tahini (sesame paste)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 21, 2004
WHEN MING Tsai roasts a duck, he saves the fat. A spoonful of duck fat adds terrific flavor to scrambled eggs or to stir-fry dishes, he said. Salvaging the duck fat is also illustrative of the attitude he grew up with, a waste-not want-not mind-set he described as "very Chinese." "You get everything you can out of that duck," he said. "You get the maximum benefit for all the time it took to cook the duck, for the pot you dirtied, for the stove you heated." After spending an afternoon with Ming - chef, cookbook author, owner of the widely acclaimed Blue Ginger restaurant outside Boston and host of a number of TV cooking shows - I came away with the impression that he, like his cooking, is a smart assimilation of East and West.
FEATURES
May 22, 1991
Marinade:1 tablespoon dry sherry or Chinese rice wine1 teaspoon cornstarch1/4 teaspoon saltPinch of white pepperStir-Fry:1/2 pound medium raw shrimp, shelled and deveined1/4 pound sea scallops, cut in half horizontally1/2 pound asparagus2 tablespoons vegetable oil2 teaspoons minced garlic1/2 cup canned baby corn, drained1/2 cup whole water chestnuts1/2 cup chicken broth2 tablespoons dry sherry or Chinese rice wine1 teaspoon sesame oil1/2 teaspoon sugar1/2 teaspoon...
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