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By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,Orange County Register | March 19, 1995
There's no doubt that fresh spinach is good for us, and it can be delicious, too. But it used to take so much time and devotion to clean it. The stems had to be cut or pulled off and the leaves submerged in plenty of cold water; sometimes it took two or three changes of water to remove every trace of grit and grime. Then it needed to be drained and dried.Now it's in the bag, prominently displayed in the produce section. It's clean and ready to cook or eat raw.Place several handfuls of clean spinach-in-the-bag in a microwave-safe casserole -- stems and all; the leaves can be left whole or chopped for easier eating.
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By Donna Ellis | September 21, 2011
Vinegar is one of humanity's oldest condiments, and when it comes to mealtimes, it can be among the home cook's best friends. Vinegar is made by acetic fermentation, a process that basically converts alcohol into acid. Most countries produce their own vinegars, typically based on the most popular alcohol there. So, France and Italy produce wine vinegars. Spain brings you sherry vinegar. Asians distill rice wine (e.g. sake) vinegar, while Great Britain creates vinegar from beer (malt vinegar)
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 21, 2001
Occasionally, when I invite friends for dinner, a guest will remind me (in a polite but insistent manner) that he or she is on a low-fat diet. The strong, assertive flavors and interesting textures of Artic Char with Bok Choy, Garlic and Ginger meets these criteria. The delectable bok choy, still somewhat crisp, made a fine garnish for the tender, flaky arctic char fillets imbued with the salty taste of soy and complemented by the mild acidity of rice vinegar. To accompany this entree, you could serve rice drizzled with toasted sesame oil and sprinkled with chives and offer poached pears scented with fragrant spices for dessert.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | January 7, 2009
The economy is so bad that even pretty cheap Chinese takeout food has become a luxury. This adaptation of a recipe from Fine Cooking's latest annual cookbook lets you make a great version of Orange Chicken at home. You'll save money by buying a bulk package of bone-in chicken thighs and removing the skin yourself. SHOPPING LIST Orange : 89 cents Soy sauce: 20 cents Rice vinegar: 20 cents Brown sugar: 7 cents Red-pepper flakes : 15 cents Chicken thighs: $3.18 Eggs: 37 cents Cornstarch: 21 cents Canola oil: 32 cents Scallions: 89 cents Rice: 25 cents TOTAL*: $6.73 *Prices are calculated based on the amount used in the recipe.
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By Sujata Massey and Sujata Massey,Evening Sun Staff | June 12, 1991
VEGETABLES ARE A natural for microwaving. While boiling often drains vegetables of their natural bright colors, crisp textures and nutrient content, a well-timed zap in the microwave oven can improve results.Pat Baird, in her book "Quick Harvest" (Prentice Hall 1991, 271 pp. $21.95) demonstrates how the microwave can be used to cook vegetable-centered meals from scratch. Ethnic influences from Vietnam, Thailand, Italy and Mexico give many of the dishes special interest. Garlic, vinegar, lemon and spices all contribute to making the vegetable dishes taste like main courses.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | January 7, 2009
The economy is so bad that even pretty cheap Chinese takeout food has become a luxury. This adaptation of a recipe from Fine Cooking's latest annual cookbook lets you make a great version of Orange Chicken at home. You'll save money by buying a bulk package of bone-in chicken thighs and removing the skin yourself. SHOPPING LIST Orange : 89 cents Soy sauce: 20 cents Rice vinegar: 20 cents Brown sugar: 7 cents Red-pepper flakes : 15 cents Chicken thighs: $3.18 Eggs: 37 cents Cornstarch: 21 cents Canola oil: 32 cents Scallions: 89 cents Rice: 25 cents TOTAL*: $6.73 *Prices are calculated based on the amount used in the recipe.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2003
A different kind of Florida fruit The efforts of south Florida farmers to recover from the devastation of Hurricane Andrew more than a decade ago at last are bearing fruit - literally. Many farmers who lost crops during the disaster planted their fields in lychees, one of the most revered fruits in Asia. Now the Florida-grown fruit is hitting the supermarkets. The small fruits have knobby reddish-brown skins and white juicy flesh. They are reminiscent of grapes, but possess a delicate perfume of roses and jasmine.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | February 13, 1991
Kathy Gunst, author of "Leftovers" (HarperCollins, $25), says a well-stocked pantry is the key to turning leftovers into fine food. She suggests the following staples to keep on hand, but points out they are just a guideline. "You don't have to bDijon mustard or Chinese rice wine the next. But I certainly am not saying that if you don't have all the things in your pantry you can't use the book."*Butter -- preferably unsalted.*Canned and bottled foods -- red and white kidney beans, chick peas, capers, chutney, cornichons, horseradish, mayonnaise, mustard, pimiento, salsa, Tabasco, tahini (sesame paste)
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Universal Press Syndicate | January 25, 1995
Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan. 31, is China's biggest holiday -- and an ideal time to discover the ease with which dim sum can be prepared at home.Loosely translated as "heart's delight," dim sum is an array of appetizer-sized morsels, from meat-filled dumplings to sweet buns, offered on trays to diners, who select the ones that "delight their heart."In southern China, teahouses have served dim sum since the 10th century. The ancient tradition probably grew out of holiday feasting.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | September 21, 2011
Vinegar is one of humanity's oldest condiments, and when it comes to mealtimes, it can be among the home cook's best friends. Vinegar is made by acetic fermentation, a process that basically converts alcohol into acid. Most countries produce their own vinegars, typically based on the most popular alcohol there. So, France and Italy produce wine vinegars. Spain brings you sherry vinegar. Asians distill rice wine (e.g. sake) vinegar, while Great Britain creates vinegar from beer (malt vinegar)
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2003
A different kind of Florida fruit The efforts of south Florida farmers to recover from the devastation of Hurricane Andrew more than a decade ago at last are bearing fruit - literally. Many farmers who lost crops during the disaster planted their fields in lychees, one of the most revered fruits in Asia. Now the Florida-grown fruit is hitting the supermarkets. The small fruits have knobby reddish-brown skins and white juicy flesh. They are reminiscent of grapes, but possess a delicate perfume of roses and jasmine.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 21, 2001
Occasionally, when I invite friends for dinner, a guest will remind me (in a polite but insistent manner) that he or she is on a low-fat diet. The strong, assertive flavors and interesting textures of Artic Char with Bok Choy, Garlic and Ginger meets these criteria. The delectable bok choy, still somewhat crisp, made a fine garnish for the tender, flaky arctic char fillets imbued with the salty taste of soy and complemented by the mild acidity of rice vinegar. To accompany this entree, you could serve rice drizzled with toasted sesame oil and sprinkled with chives and offer poached pears scented with fragrant spices for dessert.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,Orange County Register | March 19, 1995
There's no doubt that fresh spinach is good for us, and it can be delicious, too. But it used to take so much time and devotion to clean it. The stems had to be cut or pulled off and the leaves submerged in plenty of cold water; sometimes it took two or three changes of water to remove every trace of grit and grime. Then it needed to be drained and dried.Now it's in the bag, prominently displayed in the produce section. It's clean and ready to cook or eat raw.Place several handfuls of clean spinach-in-the-bag in a microwave-safe casserole -- stems and all; the leaves can be left whole or chopped for easier eating.
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Universal Press Syndicate | January 25, 1995
Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan. 31, is China's biggest holiday -- and an ideal time to discover the ease with which dim sum can be prepared at home.Loosely translated as "heart's delight," dim sum is an array of appetizer-sized morsels, from meat-filled dumplings to sweet buns, offered on trays to diners, who select the ones that "delight their heart."In southern China, teahouses have served dim sum since the 10th century. The ancient tradition probably grew out of holiday feasting.
FEATURES
By Sujata Massey and Sujata Massey,Evening Sun Staff | June 12, 1991
VEGETABLES ARE A natural for microwaving. While boiling often drains vegetables of their natural bright colors, crisp textures and nutrient content, a well-timed zap in the microwave oven can improve results.Pat Baird, in her book "Quick Harvest" (Prentice Hall 1991, 271 pp. $21.95) demonstrates how the microwave can be used to cook vegetable-centered meals from scratch. Ethnic influences from Vietnam, Thailand, Italy and Mexico give many of the dishes special interest. Garlic, vinegar, lemon and spices all contribute to making the vegetable dishes taste like main courses.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | February 13, 1991
Kathy Gunst, author of "Leftovers" (HarperCollins, $25), says a well-stocked pantry is the key to turning leftovers into fine food. She suggests the following staples to keep on hand, but points out they are just a guideline. "You don't have to bDijon mustard or Chinese rice wine the next. But I certainly am not saying that if you don't have all the things in your pantry you can't use the book."*Butter -- preferably unsalted.*Canned and bottled foods -- red and white kidney beans, chick peas, capers, chutney, cornichons, horseradish, mayonnaise, mustard, pimiento, salsa, Tabasco, tahini (sesame paste)
FEATURES
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | July 19, 1998
Cool on the tongue, spicy on the palate, icy-cold noodles and a smorgasbord of toppings make a refreshing warm-weather menu. Akin to pasta salad, this satisfying Chinese specialty is a meal all by itself when the toppings include a satisfying assortment of cooked meats, poultry or seafood; raw and blanched vegetables; and nuts or fruit.Preparing the noodles several hours ahead or overnight allows them to fully absorb the dressing, a blend of four flavors fundamental to Chinese cuisine: salty, sour, sweet and hot. Most toppings can be prepared ahead as well and refrigerated until needed.
FEATURES
January 16, 1991
Try this delicious salad when you want a quick, refreshing meal. The recipe is courtesy of the California Apricot Advisory Board.Apricot Thai Salad 2 cups sliced fresh or dried apricots2 cups diced cooked chicken1 cup sliced cucumber, peeled1 cup bean sprouts, rinsed1/4 cup rice vinegar1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro2 teaspoons sugar1/4 cup vegetable oil1/2 teaspoon chili oil2 tablespoons coarsley chopped peanuts1 lime, cut into wedgesIn a large bowl,...
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