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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 1, 1995
I have a new candidate for the hole-in-the-wall with great, incredibly cheap food.Saigon, Baltimore's newest Vietnamese restaurant, doesn't quite fill the bill. For one thing, it's not a hole-in-the-wall. It's too clean and neat, although the green oilcloth tablecloths are thumbtacked in place, and the refrigerated drinks case is an important feature of the decor. For another, the food is good, sometimes excellent, but great is stretching it. Incredibly cheap is right on the mark, though.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 6, 2004
German artist Annette Sauermann's severe and luminous wall relief sculptures, on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery through May 22, look at first glance like 1960s-inspired minimalist boxes with bands of white paper or film stretched taut across their open frames. In fact, however, the inspiration for Sauermann's geometric constructions comes less from Donald Judd's austere investigations of rectangular solids than from James Turrell's ecstatic meditations on light or Mark Rothko's color field paintings.
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By Karol V. Menzie | May 2, 1992
5513 Harford Road. Hours: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sundays to Thursdays and 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. (410) 426-8282 or (410) 426-8288.We knew, the minute the sign went up, it was the start of something good. "Coming soon," it said, "Chinese carryout."Sure enough, when Fast Wok opened a year or so ago, it was everything we hoped for and more. Talk about location -- it's right next door to the major video-rental store in Hamilton. You can place your order, pop over and pick out a movie, and return to pick up a steaming, fragrant and very reasonably priced meal.
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By Janet Hazen and Janet Hazen,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 24, 1996
Here's the secret to creating a variety of the most scrumptious cross-cultural appetizers and dishes: Asian wrappers. Won ton, "sue gow," "su my" and egg roll skins, along with rice paper, are versatile, easy to work with and very inexpensive.Square-shaped won ton skins filled with interesting mixtures of meat, poultry and vegetables and deep-fried are a favorite snack both here and in Asia. Delicate and tender ultra-thin su my wrappers formed around seafood fillings and served in a flavorful broth are typical Chinese fare, as are popular pot stickers with their crispy-brown bottoms that contrast so nicely with the succulent steamed bodies.
FEATURES
By Janet Hazen and Janet Hazen,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 24, 1996
Here's the secret to creating a variety of the most scrumptious cross-cultural appetizers and dishes: Asian wrappers. Won ton, "sue gow," "su my" and egg roll skins, along with rice paper, are versatile, easy to work with and very inexpensive.Square-shaped won ton skins filled with interesting mixtures of meat, poultry and vegetables and deep-fried are a favorite snack both here and in Asia. Delicate and tender ultra-thin su my wrappers formed around seafood fillings and served in a flavorful broth are typical Chinese fare, as are popular pot stickers with their crispy-brown bottoms that contrast so nicely with the succulent steamed bodies.
FEATURES
By Donna Peremes and Donna Peremes,Knight-Ridder News Service Something fishy New York Daily NewsEdited by Catherine Cook | October 18, 1990
Fashion according to BlassBill Blass is both a famous and familiar name. You'll find it on more than 70 products ranging from fashion collections for women and men to sheets, shoes and even a car -- the Bill Blass Lincoln Continental.In San Francisco recently to launch his newest fragrances, Basic Black, Nude, and Hot, he talked about his upcoming spring 1991 collection and his views on the way American women dress.His collection, to be unveiled Oct. 29 in New York, will include "lots of color," he says.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 6, 2004
German artist Annette Sauermann's severe and luminous wall relief sculptures, on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery through May 22, look at first glance like 1960s-inspired minimalist boxes with bands of white paper or film stretched taut across their open frames. In fact, however, the inspiration for Sauermann's geometric constructions comes less from Donald Judd's austere investigations of rectangular solids than from James Turrell's ecstatic meditations on light or Mark Rothko's color field paintings.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | March 28, 1994
About 20 Western Maryland College students come to a classroom in Baker Memorial Chapel to study a religion, but God has nothing to do with it.They come to study philosophy, but intellectual thought has little to do with it, either.Dr. Laurence Wu, associate professor of philosophy and religious studies, introduced "Zen and Creativity," a 200-level philosophy course, into the college's curriculum with the intent of giving the students a break from the usual."I thought it would be interesting to try something new," said the professor, who has taught at WMC for 18 years.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | September 16, 1993
Visitors to the exhibits at the School 33 Art Center usually have but a vague awareness of the artists who maintain studios there. You may sometimes hear an artist flinging paint against canvas in one studio, or another artist turning on a radio in hopes that it will serve as muse. You may even occasionally glimpse real live artists scurrying toward the glorious isolation of their upstairs studios.Eight of these artists have emerged from their studios and are sharing an exhibit in the main downstairs gallery at School 33. Although this group show never quite wows you, there is enough interesting and diverse artwork to keep you happily moving around the gallery.
FEATURES
November 21, 2006
Art Watercolor exhibit at MICA gallery See a showcase of watercolor creations on handmade rice paper by Ken Tisa, director of the Center of Art and Culture in Aix-en-Provence, France, in the exhibit, War and Isolation from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. today at the Maryland Institute College of Art, Pinkard Gallery, Bunting Center, 1401 Mount Royal Ave. Free. 410-225-2300 or www.mica.edu.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 1, 1995
I have a new candidate for the hole-in-the-wall with great, incredibly cheap food.Saigon, Baltimore's newest Vietnamese restaurant, doesn't quite fill the bill. For one thing, it's not a hole-in-the-wall. It's too clean and neat, although the green oilcloth tablecloths are thumbtacked in place, and the refrigerated drinks case is an important feature of the decor. For another, the food is good, sometimes excellent, but great is stretching it. Incredibly cheap is right on the mark, though.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | March 28, 1994
About 20 Western Maryland College students come to a classroom in Baker Memorial Chapel to study a religion, but God has nothing to do with it.They come to study philosophy, but intellectual thought has little to do with it, either.Dr. Laurence Wu, associate professor of philosophy and religious studies, introduced "Zen and Creativity," a 200-level philosophy course, into the college's curriculum with the intent of giving the students a break from the usual."I thought it would be interesting to try something new," said the professor, who has taught at WMC for 18 years.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | September 16, 1993
Visitors to the exhibits at the School 33 Art Center usually have but a vague awareness of the artists who maintain studios there. You may sometimes hear an artist flinging paint against canvas in one studio, or another artist turning on a radio in hopes that it will serve as muse. You may even occasionally glimpse real live artists scurrying toward the glorious isolation of their upstairs studios.Eight of these artists have emerged from their studios and are sharing an exhibit in the main downstairs gallery at School 33. Although this group show never quite wows you, there is enough interesting and diverse artwork to keep you happily moving around the gallery.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | May 2, 1992
5513 Harford Road. Hours: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sundays to Thursdays and 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. (410) 426-8282 or (410) 426-8288.We knew, the minute the sign went up, it was the start of something good. "Coming soon," it said, "Chinese carryout."Sure enough, when Fast Wok opened a year or so ago, it was everything we hoped for and more. Talk about location -- it's right next door to the major video-rental store in Hamilton. You can place your order, pop over and pick out a movie, and return to pick up a steaming, fragrant and very reasonably priced meal.
FEATURES
By Donna Peremes and Donna Peremes,Knight-Ridder News Service Something fishy New York Daily NewsEdited by Catherine Cook | October 18, 1990
Fashion according to BlassBill Blass is both a famous and familiar name. You'll find it on more than 70 products ranging from fashion collections for women and men to sheets, shoes and even a car -- the Bill Blass Lincoln Continental.In San Francisco recently to launch his newest fragrances, Basic Black, Nude, and Hot, he talked about his upcoming spring 1991 collection and his views on the way American women dress.His collection, to be unveiled Oct. 29 in New York, will include "lots of color," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | January 31, 2012
Watch the promo for a new Maryland Public Television special featuring Chef Bryan Voltaggio, "Obsessed with Everything Food: A Living Magazine. " In this promotional clip, you can see Voltaggio in Volt 's kitchen using an offset spatula to fill a rice-paper shell with crabmeat and take a bite from a snowball. Of course he looks great doing it. Premiering Feb. 7 at 8 p.m., "Obsessed with Everything Food: A Living Magazine" features Voltaggio performing his cooking magic at Volt and touring some of his favorite culinary spots across the state.
FEATURES
By Michele Santos and Michele Santos,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 30, 1994
You make a beeline for the egg rolls at Chinese restaurant buffets. You relish the crunch of the crispy Crab Rangoon served with your lunch special. You wonder why you can't make these appealing appetizers at home.L Well, you can. And it's not as difficult as you might think.Even if you don't take a class, a good recipe and a willingness to experiment are all you need to learn to make many Asian appetizers.By doing it yourself, you can also make these foods more healthful. You can use low-fat cream cheese in the Crab Rangoon, fry the egg rolls in canola oil or just stick with fresh spring rolls, which aren't fried.
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