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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2011
The dish : Tai Chin ($6.95) At the very least, this pho with round steak and brisket is as accessible to the first-timer as any Vietnamese recipe, aside from, maybe, a spring roll. The pho curious can start with Tai Chin as an introduction to an exotic staple at a bargain price. For the pho lover who wouldn't dream of a bowl without tendon and tripe, An Loi offers, in all, a dozen pho selections. Given the exceptionally neutral tones of cooked beef and rice noodles, the broth needs to carry the day. An Loi's Tai Chin does, with subtly and a deceptively simple flavor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| September 4, 2013
A soup-centric ethnic restaurant seems like an odd fit for a suburban hotel. But at the Best Western on Cromwell Bridge Road in Towson, Pho Towson has made a well-deserved splash. Pho - the popular Vietnamese soup with a DIY component - is scrumptious and healthy. The meal starts with a bowl of broth and noodles. Diners customize with herbs, citrus and protein. At Pho Towson, most ingredients are fresh and the broths are complex. Coupled with service that is kind, if occasionally spotty, the restaurant is a treat for both locals and hotel guests.
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NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2002
I've always figured that anybody could find something they like in the 800 block of North Charles Street, whether it's good Chinese, good Afghan or a good martini. After a recent visit to Thairish, I would add very good Thai food to that list as well. The oddly named eatery sits in a tiny 500-square-foot space and offers seating for 18 people. In a nice touch, a fresh flower sat in a vase on each of the three tables. Thai prints and maps decorate the walls. Thai native Kerrigan Kitikul opened the restaurant more than a decade ago and still does the cooking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2011
The dish : Tai Chin ($6.95) At the very least, this pho with round steak and brisket is as accessible to the first-timer as any Vietnamese recipe, aside from, maybe, a spring roll. The pho curious can start with Tai Chin as an introduction to an exotic staple at a bargain price. For the pho lover who wouldn't dream of a bowl without tendon and tripe, An Loi offers, in all, a dozen pho selections. Given the exceptionally neutral tones of cooked beef and rice noodles, the broth needs to carry the day. An Loi's Tai Chin does, with subtly and a deceptively simple flavor.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2002
What if you want a quick lunch of soup or salad? Or maybe you're in the mood for a vegetarian meal? Or maybe it's time for multiple dishes with contrasting flavors, varied textures and exotic ingredients? Vietnamese cuisine can satisfy all these requirements and is becoming increasingly popular. Pho Dat Thanh, off Snowden River Parkway at Columbia Market Place, opened April 17 and offers about 150 authentic Vietnamese dishes. "We're still working with the menu, to improve it and find new and excellent dishes," said manager Jim Louang.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2004
A few weeks ago, an acquaintance asked me if I knew a good place for dim sum. At the time, I had to admit I didn't. In fact, I didn't know of a single place in the Baltimore area that served it. Dim sum - basically Cantonese-style noshes that can range from green bean sheet rolls to steamed snail - is not offered at the average strip-mall Chinese takeout. But now I know that an excellent assortment is served at Chinatown Cafe. The 2-year-old restaurant, helmed by Joann and Wuen Cheung Wu, attracts a multi-ethnic crowd despite its so-so Park Avenue location.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | elizabeth.large@baltsun.com and Sun restaurant critic | February 7, 2010
Vietnamese pho is rapidly replacing chicken soup as the universal cure-all. Or maybe it's just me. In this Worst Winter Ever, where the colds all last three weeks and the threat of snow never ends, a large bowl of steaming broth filled with rice noodles and interesting cuts of beef - a soup that you individualize with garnishes served on the side like bean sprouts, fresh cilantro and basil leaves, hot peppers and wedges of lime, not to mention condiments such...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| September 4, 2013
A soup-centric ethnic restaurant seems like an odd fit for a suburban hotel. But at the Best Western on Cromwell Bridge Road in Towson, Pho Towson has made a well-deserved splash. Pho - the popular Vietnamese soup with a DIY component - is scrumptious and healthy. The meal starts with a bowl of broth and noodles. Diners customize with herbs, citrus and protein. At Pho Towson, most ingredients are fresh and the broths are complex. Coupled with service that is kind, if occasionally spotty, the restaurant is a treat for both locals and hotel guests.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
Ruth Wick of Lenoir City, Tenn., sent in a short request. "I would like the recipe for classic Swedish meatballs." Sandi Till of Sunriver, Ore., responded. "Here are Swedish meatballs that were my family's favorite for a very long time -- 45 years. My three children always loved them, and now five grandchildren enjoy them, and I hope you like them too, Ruth! We love them on fluffy rice or noodles." Recipe requests Gertrude Lyles of La Plata writes that she wants the recipe for a dessert served in the employees' cafeteria at the Greater Southeast Community Hospital.
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2001
Celebrating the 15th anniversary of Bangkok Delight's opening this month, Randy Jett has maintained its unusual dM-icor of up-side-down traditional Thai silk umbrellas. "The original owners liked the look of the Thai umbrellas and the different designs and colors on the umbrellas and thought they would look much better than the typical ceilings, and they did," he says. Thai food has an international reputation for being fiery spicy - but that isn't necessarily so, according to Jett, who bought the restaurant in 1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | elizabeth.large@baltsun.com and Sun restaurant critic | February 7, 2010
Vietnamese pho is rapidly replacing chicken soup as the universal cure-all. Or maybe it's just me. In this Worst Winter Ever, where the colds all last three weeks and the threat of snow never ends, a large bowl of steaming broth filled with rice noodles and interesting cuts of beef - a soup that you individualize with garnishes served on the side like bean sprouts, fresh cilantro and basil leaves, hot peppers and wedges of lime, not to mention condiments such...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2004
A few weeks ago, an acquaintance asked me if I knew a good place for dim sum. At the time, I had to admit I didn't. In fact, I didn't know of a single place in the Baltimore area that served it. Dim sum - basically Cantonese-style noshes that can range from green bean sheet rolls to steamed snail - is not offered at the average strip-mall Chinese takeout. But now I know that an excellent assortment is served at Chinatown Cafe. The 2-year-old restaurant, helmed by Joann and Wuen Cheung Wu, attracts a multi-ethnic crowd despite its so-so Park Avenue location.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
Ruth Wick of Lenoir City, Tenn., sent in a short request. "I would like the recipe for classic Swedish meatballs." Sandi Till of Sunriver, Ore., responded. "Here are Swedish meatballs that were my family's favorite for a very long time -- 45 years. My three children always loved them, and now five grandchildren enjoy them, and I hope you like them too, Ruth! We love them on fluffy rice or noodles." Recipe requests Gertrude Lyles of La Plata writes that she wants the recipe for a dessert served in the employees' cafeteria at the Greater Southeast Community Hospital.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2002
I've always figured that anybody could find something they like in the 800 block of North Charles Street, whether it's good Chinese, good Afghan or a good martini. After a recent visit to Thairish, I would add very good Thai food to that list as well. The oddly named eatery sits in a tiny 500-square-foot space and offers seating for 18 people. In a nice touch, a fresh flower sat in a vase on each of the three tables. Thai prints and maps decorate the walls. Thai native Kerrigan Kitikul opened the restaurant more than a decade ago and still does the cooking.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2002
What if you want a quick lunch of soup or salad? Or maybe you're in the mood for a vegetarian meal? Or maybe it's time for multiple dishes with contrasting flavors, varied textures and exotic ingredients? Vietnamese cuisine can satisfy all these requirements and is becoming increasingly popular. Pho Dat Thanh, off Snowden River Parkway at Columbia Market Place, opened April 17 and offers about 150 authentic Vietnamese dishes. "We're still working with the menu, to improve it and find new and excellent dishes," said manager Jim Louang.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff and Robin Tunnicliff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 17, 2002
A milkshake with large, brown gelatinous marbles of tapioca pearls was not exactly the item we expected to like best at An Loi. But it was. And the "bubble drink," as the owners of the tiny Vietnamese storefront restaurant call the shake, was also the only thing we both found outstanding. An Loi makes the traditional Vietnamese drink by blending fresh fruit and condensed milk, then pouring the mixture over a cluster of tapioca. The six flavors offered range from safe for the American palate (strawberry)
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen | January 18, 1992
BANGKOK DELIGHT 8825 Centre Park Drive in Columbia. Hours: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday; 5 to 10 p.m. Saturday; 5 to 9 p.m. Sunday. Call (410) 730-0032. Colorful, ornate paper umbrellas hang upside-down from the ceiling of Bangkok Delight, making for a fun eating atmosphere. The eat-in menu is extensive, but the carryout menu has plenty to offer as well, including four soup dishes, 10 appetizers, a handful of desserts and close to 30 entrees, ranging from curry to seafood to Thai fried rice and noodles.
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