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By Susan Reimer | January 7, 1997
WHEN I SAW my friend Patty in the grocery store, my hand was on a box of pre-packaged Rice Krispies Treats and I am not sure which of us was more embarrassed."
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
Barbara Block of Berrien Springs, Mich., was searching for a recipe for Rice Krispies treat ice cream bars that she said were very popular in the 1960s. Rose Barnes of South Bend, Ind., sent in a recipe that she started making years ago with her children and now enjoys making with her grandkids. She was sure it was the one Block was looking for. Kellogg's Rice Krispies cereal hit store shelves in the 1920s and was a success with adults. However, the breakfast cereal's real popularity with kids didn't come until more than a decade later, when Rice Krispies treats were created by a Kellogg's employee, Mildred Day. She mixed the cereal with butter and marshmallows, and an instant sensation was born . This recipe is proof that Rice Krispie treats can be easily adapted and used in many different ways, and are surely as popular today as they have always been.
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NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 2006
Hollee Paterson of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for Welsh rarebit, preferably made without beer. Jenny McKenzie from Windsor, Colo., sent in a recipe for this classic dish taken from what she calls her "cooking bible": Betty Crocker's Picture Cookbook, published in 1950. She says she grew up with this cookbook in her mother's kitchen and was very pleased to inherit her grandmother's copy. The introduction to this recipe says that long ago in Wales the peasants were not permitted to hunt on the estates of noblemen, so they created this savory and satisfying dish, which substituted melted cheese for rabbit, the prize of the hunt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | June 11, 2013
Hardcore college calculus and lab science courses need to be balanced out with a little bit of "South Park" and zombies. Thankfully, Dr. Joshua Joseph Baron at McDaniel has that covered. The 37-year-old, who has been at McDaniel for seven years, teaches such awesome classes as South Park and Contemporary Social Issues and Philosophy of Violent Media. Oh, and Introduction to Philosophy. We're sure the philosophy class is very thorough and interesting, but ... seriously .... where do we sign up for the others.
NEWS
June 14, 1996
Mildred Day,92, who helped develop the chewy, gooey recipe for Rice Krispies Treats, died Sunday in Bloomington, Minn.She worked for Kellogg Co. in the 1920s, when she and Malitta Jensen came up with the treat -- a mixture of Rice Krispies, marshmallows and butter. The treats were a fund-raising venture for a Camp Fire Girls group and a way to promote the cereal.Robert Morey,83, who designed the seal for the U.S. Marshals Service and interested President John F. Kennedy and Sen. Edward M. Kennedy in painting, died of cancer June 5 in Rockport, Mass.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | April 3, 1992
"Governor, I have another question about your admitted use of marijuana in the past.""I thought we had put that behind us. As I explained, I tried it once many years ago. Took two puffs, didn't inhale, didn't like it and haven't tried it since.""Yes, Governor, but there are still some points that should be cleared up to satisfy the public's right to know what the New York media believe they have a right to know.""Such as?""Do you know if the marijuana was Maui Wowee?""I have no idea where it came from."
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 2006
Marlene Wittenberg of McHenry, Ill., was looking for a recipe for the no-bake balls of peanut butter, Rice Krispies and chocolate that she sampled at a party over the holidays. Denise Colberg of Windsor, Colo., sent in a recipe for Chocolate-Peanut-Butter Balls that, coincidentally, she got at a Christmas party in the 1970s. These tasty treats are sure to be a hit any time of year. They are fairly easy to make and a little different from your basic Rice Krispies treat. For variety, you might even try dipping half of the balls in melted butterscotch pieces and half in melted chocolate.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2001
Phyllis Auvil of Johnstown, Pa., requested a date-cookie recipe. She recalls the cookie was cooked on top of the stove and had dates, Rice Krispies and coconut in it. Her response came from Ann Dahne of Towson, who noted, "I use pre-chopped, lightly sugared dates, but prefer walnuts in these cookies. A perfect cookie for nonbakers to make! Even people who think they don't like dates enjoy these." Date Cookies Makes 4 dozen 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter 1 cup granulated sugar 1/2 pound dates, finely chopped 1 egg, well beaten 1 1/2 cups Rice Krispies 1/2 cup chopped nuts pinch of salt 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups shredded coconut Melt butter with sugar in the top of a double boiler over hot water.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 1, 1998
BATTLE CREEK, Mich. -- Kellogg Co. said second-quarter earnings fell 17 percent and warned of further declines, as the world's largest cereal maker lost sales to cheaper supermarket brands.The maker of Frosted Flakes and Rice Krispies said net income fell to $143.2 million, or 35 cents a diluted share, from $171.6 million, or 41 cents, before a charge a year ago. That missed the 37 cents expected by analysts surveyed by First Call Corp.Revenue fell slightly, to $1.71 billion from $1.72 billion.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 5, 2007
I think the best advice for fans of the Baltimore Orioles is this: Keep your expectations low. That way, you won't be crushingly disappointed when they don't win the division, and you might be pleasantly surprised if they do. Do I speak the truth, faithful companions? Are we on the same page? I think I give sound advice. You're looking at a guy who gave up high hopes for Lent and never went back. I now have reached the stage in life where I keep my expectations where my mother, the former Rose Popolo, keeps her breakfast cereal - on a low shelf.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
A group of friends and family from Elkridge prepared for the Preakness as they have every year for decades. They packed tubs of Rice Krispies treats, shrimp salad, macaroni salad, cashews, soft drinks and a giant bag of Utz chips into their cars and headed to Pimlico Race Course . But this year, the Boston Marathon bombing was in the back of their minds. Peggy Maher, one of the group, brought her grandson for the first time. Just in case the unthinkable happened, she went over an emergency plan with everyone should they get separated: Meet at Sinai Hospital, a little over a mile away.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | January 19, 2013
You want story lines for Sunday's AFC championship game? Oh, do we have storylines. Here are just a few: Are the Ravens really this team of destiny we keep hearing about? Can they avenge last year's 23-20 loss to the New England Patriots in this same game? Can they exorcise once and for all that horror-show ending that deatured Lee Evans' dropped/stripped pass Billy Cundiff's shanked field goal? Is this Ray Lewis' last game? Will Ed Reed and his sore neck, which now has all the consistency of Rice Krispies, follow Ray-Ray into retirement if the Ravens lose?
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | October 8, 2008
Where there's a cause, can a bake sale be far behind? Whether it's for the church outreach program or the school PTA, for Barack Obama or John McCain, or for a nationwide campaign to stop childhood hunger, putting out a tray of enticing goodies always seems like a fun way to raise a few bucks. Until it's your turn to bake, that is. Then you may feel the pressure. Must you come up with something unique, distinctive and delicious that will leave your fellow parents or politicos clamoring for the recipe?
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun reporter | October 6, 2007
Several times this week, Don Pooley has been stopped by fans at Baltimore Country Club watching the Constellation Energy Senior Players Championship. Many have thanked him for the thrills he gave them at nearby Caves Valley Golf Club during the 2002 U.S. Senior Open. It was there that Pooley beat Hall of Famer Tom Watson in a five-hole playoff. "I've had a lot of people stop me and tell me what an unbelievable finish that was, the best tournament they ever saw, the best playoff they ever saw," Pooley said yesterday.
NEWS
By Joel Stein | July 24, 2007
They want to help the kids, I get that. We have a childhood obesity epidemic in America. But Kellogg's decision last month to stop advertising sugar cereals to kids under 12 is a disastrous mistake. I learned everything I needed to navigate our consumer culture from my close parsing of TV commercials for sugar cereals. If it weren't for those commercials, I'd have a garage full of HeadOn right now. In a world where I had no control over where I lived, when I went to sleep or if I played soccer, Kellogg's empowered me. It wooed me. It cared what I thought.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 14, 2007
Froot Loops' days on Saturday morning television may be numbered. The Kellogg Co., based in Battle Creek, Mich., said yesterday that it would phase out advertising its products to children younger than age 12 unless the foods meet specific nutrition guidelines for calories, sugar, fat and sodium. Kellogg also announced that it would stop using licensed characters or branded toys to promote foods unless the products meet the nutrition guidelines.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 15, 1998
Because they are short and often paired together, Pietro Mascagni's "Cavalleria Rusticana" ("Rustic Chivalry") and Ruggiero Leoncavallo's "Pagliacci" ("Clowns") are locked together in an eternal embrace as "Cav & Pag." They were performed together for the first time at the Metropolitan Opera in 1893 and have been performed that way more than 500 times since.They are as popular as they are short. Everyone who has ever turned on a TV set or gone for a ride in an elevator has heard the "intermezzo" from "Cav."
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 8, 1992
The other morning I tested my knowledge of my family's current tastes in food. I did this accidentally. I overslept.Since it was a school morning and I was supposed to drive the neighborhood car pool, our house was in a frenzy.I was put in charge of making the kids' breakfasts and throwing together their boxed lunches.This was not my normal morning duty. Usually I am in charge of throwing clothes on the kids. I did have some experience making their breakfasts and packing their lunches. But it wasn't recent experience.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 5, 2007
I think the best advice for fans of the Baltimore Orioles is this: Keep your expectations low. That way, you won't be crushingly disappointed when they don't win the division, and you might be pleasantly surprised if they do. Do I speak the truth, faithful companions? Are we on the same page? I think I give sound advice. You're looking at a guy who gave up high hopes for Lent and never went back. I now have reached the stage in life where I keep my expectations where my mother, the former Rose Popolo, keeps her breakfast cereal - on a low shelf.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 2006
Marlene Wittenberg of McHenry, Ill., was looking for a recipe for the no-bake balls of peanut butter, Rice Krispies and chocolate that she sampled at a party over the holidays. Denise Colberg of Windsor, Colo., sent in a recipe for Chocolate-Peanut-Butter Balls that, coincidentally, she got at a Christmas party in the 1970s. These tasty treats are sure to be a hit any time of year. They are fairly easy to make and a little different from your basic Rice Krispies treat. For variety, you might even try dipping half of the balls in melted butterscotch pieces and half in melted chocolate.
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