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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 8, 1990
LandoverRomantic intrigue and changing personnel may be what keeps Fleetwood Mac an item in the gossip columns, but onstage what makes this band matter is the rhythm section.Which was why, even though singers Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie got most of the applause when the band played the Capital Centre last night, the real stars of the show were drummer Mick Fleetwood and bassist John McVie. After all, they were the ones who kept the pulse percolating behind "Rhiannon" and put the push into "Go Your Own Way."
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | August 11, 2008
While the first day of Virgin Mobile Festival at Pimlico Race Course was heavy on buzz-worthy critical darlings favoring a retro sound, yesterday was all about star power - the hottest or most celebrated names in pop, rock and mainstream hip-hop. Multi-Grammy-winning rapper-producer Kanye West capped the evening on the South Stage with the most elaborately staged performance of the two-day festival. But fans had to wait about 30 minutes for him to arrive.
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 1998
Jim Cullum is proud of his jazz band's old-fashioned virtues: its championship of classic repertory, its adherence to performing from memory and its definitive sound.The instrumentation makes the sound, but the finish comes from the fact that they're played without amplification."We are completely acoustic," says Cullum, whose San Antonio, Texas-based group will perform Saturday in Candlelight Concerts' Classic Jazz Series. "I believe that the music should come right off the strings or out of the bells, and not out of the cone of a speaker."
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO and MARC SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | August 24, 2006
A call out for unity/in every province and city/what do you think we've been saying/since we first started playing." These words end 311's "Electricity," from the 1997 album, Transistor. This summer's Unity Tour - which comes to the Nissan Pavilion tomorrow - is turning these words into actions. Sharing the stage with 311 for the whole run are the Wailers, the legendary reggae band that backed Bob Marley for his entire career, and Hawaiian band Pepper, which plays a hybrid of reggae, rock, punk and pop. The tour is a celebration of the unity in contemporary music - these bands might not have shared the stage in a segregated live music scene decades ago. At each performance, Jamaican, Hawaiian and American music come together.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 20, 1991
DISCOGRAPHYPet Shop Boys (EMI 97097)Greatest-hits compilations are like snapshot albums, covering the highlights of a career but missing the stuff in-between. That's why so many best-ofs seem disappointing; heard out of context, even the best album tracks can sound like non sequiturs. Unless, of course, the songs never connected with anything in the first place, as has been the case with the Pet Shop Boys' output. This duo is truly a singles' act, and its best work -- from the campy calculation of "Opportunities (Let's Make Lots of Money)"
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 18, 1993
Opening acts always complain about how hard it is to get an audience's attention. Talk to any musician who has spent time at the bottom of the bill, and sooner or later he or she will end up griping about having to play "while half the audience is still out in the parking lot.Fortunately, that's not something the Iguanas have to worry about: When they open for Jimmy Buffett this summer, they'll be where the crowd can't miss 'em -- on a flatbed truck in...
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By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 10, 1996
Mary Day, artistic director and founder of the Washington Ballet, is a woman of courage and optimism. In the ballet world, premieres are risky business, and her company's program of three world premieres proves her daring.Opening the program was resident choreographer Lynn Cote's "Interlacing," a dance that displayed Cote's lighter side and distinct choreographic growth. The highlight was a sunny, cleanly danced quartet featuring company members Tristi McMaster, Heather Perry, Chip Coleman and Jani Talo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
Nobody questions the nobility of those two grandmasters of big-band jazz, Duke Ellington and Count Basie. They were the best. Ellington issued his manifesto: "It Don't Mean a Thing, If It Ain't Got That Swing." But Count Basie made "that swing" the throbbing heart of his music. Ellngton's music rose like a cathedral from the solid foundation of Harry Carney's baritone sax. Basie's band floated like a racing yacht on the rhythm guitar of Freddie Green, the mainspring of the Basie rhythm section.
FEATURES
By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | May 23, 2001
For many still in thrall to "Psycho Killer" and the Jonathan Demme concert tour de force "Stop Making Sense," David Byrne's music is defined by his 15 years in Talking Heads. But for Byrne, the Heads are just one aspect of his legacy. Of course, Byrne hasn't necessarily helped his case by making increasingly obscure solo albums. But his latest solo outing, "Look into the Eyeball," is his strongest and warmest since his former band's demise more than a decade ago. Although the whirlpool funk of the Heads' heyday is long gone, Byrne has plotted new strategies, and with "Look into the Eyeball" he gets it right after a series of solo misfires.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 2, 1994
"Not bad for a bunch of old farts."That was Mick Jagger's self-mocking assessment after the Rolling Stones chugged through a gloriously cracked rendition of "Shattered" at RFK Stadium last night, and for once, Jagger's modesty wasn't just an affectation. Despite all the jokes about the Stones being not "The World's Greatest Rock and Roll Band" but "the World's Oldest Rock and Roll Band," there was nothing geriatric about the group's sound on stage.If anything, the performance the Stones gave hearkened back to the glory days of the late '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
Nobody questions the nobility of those two grandmasters of big-band jazz, Duke Ellington and Count Basie. They were the best. Ellington issued his manifesto: "It Don't Mean a Thing, If It Ain't Got That Swing." But Count Basie made "that swing" the throbbing heart of his music. Ellngton's music rose like a cathedral from the solid foundation of Harry Carney's baritone sax. Basie's band floated like a racing yacht on the rhythm guitar of Freddie Green, the mainspring of the Basie rhythm section.
FEATURES
By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | May 23, 2001
For many still in thrall to "Psycho Killer" and the Jonathan Demme concert tour de force "Stop Making Sense," David Byrne's music is defined by his 15 years in Talking Heads. But for Byrne, the Heads are just one aspect of his legacy. Of course, Byrne hasn't necessarily helped his case by making increasingly obscure solo albums. But his latest solo outing, "Look into the Eyeball," is his strongest and warmest since his former band's demise more than a decade ago. Although the whirlpool funk of the Heads' heyday is long gone, Byrne has plotted new strategies, and with "Look into the Eyeball" he gets it right after a series of solo misfires.
NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 1998
Jim Cullum is proud of his jazz band's old-fashioned virtues: its championship of classic repertory, its adherence to performing from memory and its definitive sound.The instrumentation makes the sound, but the finish comes from the fact that they're played without amplification."We are completely acoustic," says Cullum, whose San Antonio, Texas-based group will perform Saturday in Candlelight Concerts' Classic Jazz Series. "I believe that the music should come right off the strings or out of the bells, and not out of the cone of a speaker."
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 10, 1996
Mary Day, artistic director and founder of the Washington Ballet, is a woman of courage and optimism. In the ballet world, premieres are risky business, and her company's program of three world premieres proves her daring.Opening the program was resident choreographer Lynn Cote's "Interlacing," a dance that displayed Cote's lighter side and distinct choreographic growth. The highlight was a sunny, cleanly danced quartet featuring company members Tristi McMaster, Heather Perry, Chip Coleman and Jani Talo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 10, 1995
THE PROMISED LANDVarious Artists (Columbia 66969)As a social document, the Discovery Channel series "The Promised Land" offers a fascinating look at why and how blacks moved from the rural South to the urban North. As an album, "The Promised Land" tells an equally complex, somewhat more diffuse tale. In addition to an impressive array of historical recordings documenting the shifting tides of American popular music -- everything from Robert Johnson's "Sweet Home Chicago" to Sly and the Family Stone's "Stand" to Public Enemy's "Bring the Noise" -- this double album also includes new recordings that demonstrate how that heritage continues to make its impact felt.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 2, 1994
"Not bad for a bunch of old farts."That was Mick Jagger's self-mocking assessment after the Rolling Stones chugged through a gloriously cracked rendition of "Shattered" at RFK Stadium last night, and for once, Jagger's modesty wasn't just an affectation. Despite all the jokes about the Stones being not "The World's Greatest Rock and Roll Band" but "the World's Oldest Rock and Roll Band," there was nothing geriatric about the group's sound on stage.If anything, the performance the Stones gave hearkened back to the glory days of the late '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO and MARC SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | August 24, 2006
A call out for unity/in every province and city/what do you think we've been saying/since we first started playing." These words end 311's "Electricity," from the 1997 album, Transistor. This summer's Unity Tour - which comes to the Nissan Pavilion tomorrow - is turning these words into actions. Sharing the stage with 311 for the whole run are the Wailers, the legendary reggae band that backed Bob Marley for his entire career, and Hawaiian band Pepper, which plays a hybrid of reggae, rock, punk and pop. The tour is a celebration of the unity in contemporary music - these bands might not have shared the stage in a segregated live music scene decades ago. At each performance, Jamaican, Hawaiian and American music come together.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 10, 1995
THE PROMISED LANDVarious Artists (Columbia 66969)As a social document, the Discovery Channel series "The Promised Land" offers a fascinating look at why and how blacks moved from the rural South to the urban North. As an album, "The Promised Land" tells an equally complex, somewhat more diffuse tale. In addition to an impressive array of historical recordings documenting the shifting tides of American popular music -- everything from Robert Johnson's "Sweet Home Chicago" to Sly and the Family Stone's "Stand" to Public Enemy's "Bring the Noise" -- this double album also includes new recordings that demonstrate how that heritage continues to make its impact felt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 18, 1993
Opening acts always complain about how hard it is to get an audience's attention. Talk to any musician who has spent time at the bottom of the bill, and sooner or later he or she will end up griping about having to play "while half the audience is still out in the parking lot.Fortunately, that's not something the Iguanas have to worry about: When they open for Jimmy Buffett this summer, they'll be where the crowd can't miss 'em -- on a flatbed truck in...
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 20, 1991
DISCOGRAPHYPet Shop Boys (EMI 97097)Greatest-hits compilations are like snapshot albums, covering the highlights of a career but missing the stuff in-between. That's why so many best-ofs seem disappointing; heard out of context, even the best album tracks can sound like non sequiturs. Unless, of course, the songs never connected with anything in the first place, as has been the case with the Pet Shop Boys' output. This duo is truly a singles' act, and its best work -- from the campy calculation of "Opportunities (Let's Make Lots of Money)"
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