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By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,New York Times News Service | September 26, 1991
His Grinch stole Christmas, but grew a big heart and gave it back. His Onceler chopped down the beautiful truffula trees, but one seed survived to give hope for the future. If this were a Dr. Seuss book rather than real life, someone -- a Who, perhaps, or maybe a wumbus -- would figure out a way for Theodor Seuss "Ted" Geisel to keep writing about sneedles and tweedlebeetles and ziffs and zuffs, and to keep making perfect and wonderful sense of it all.But Mr. Geisel, known and beloved as Dr. Seuss, died Tuesday night of multiple organ failure at his home in La Jolla, Calif.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For the Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Garrison Keillor lounged by a backyard pool, sipping a glass of wine. Isaac Bashevis Singer sat at a dining room table and ate homemade pea soup. Edward Albee arrived with a new boyfriend in tow. Over the past four decades, the likes of Larry McMurtry, Frank McCourt, Grace Paley and Lucille Clifton, along with a dozen or so other well-known authors and poets, have made themselves at home during visits to Columbia. Many of them lingered after their readings to share a meal, and some even stayed on as overnight houseguests.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 2002
May a jurist rule in verse, if he's dignified and terse? Or are some texts meant to be wholly free of poetry? A dissent last month by a justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, in seven quatrains and one footnote, drew a sharp response from two colleagues. Chief Justice Stephen A. Zappala wrote that "an opinion that expresses itself in rhyme reflects poorly on the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania." Justice Ralph J. Cappy said "every jurist has the right to express him or herself in a manner the jurist deems appropriate," but expressed concern about "the perception that litigants and the public at large might form when an opinion of the court is reduced to rhyme."
FEATURES
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
Graduation speeches are often forgettable, but chances are members of the McDaniel College Class of 2014 won't soon forget when their college president rapped before handing out degrees. That's right: McDaniel President Roger N. Casey chose to deliver his brief remarks to Westminster college's 760 graduates in the form of an a cappella rhyme on Saturday afternoon. The social media-loving president dropped a few pop culture references and used his apparent favorite word: " McSwagger ," a term he invented to express McDaniel pride.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 28, 1995
Andy Wakshul's penchant for poems has landed him in the Doggerel House, but he's happy to be there -- that's the name of the east Columbia man's business of rhyming for dollars.The 46-year-old poet-for-hire composes personal poems for any occasion -- from a silly birthday rhyme to a romantic ballad.Although he's been writing poetry since he was 6 years old, Mr. Wakshul just recently turned his home in Kings Contrivance village into the Doggerel House."Doggerel is comical, lower-class poetry.
FEATURES
By A.A. Milne | June 14, 1998
'Sneezles'Christopher Robin had wheezlesAnd sneezles,They bundled himIntoHis bed.They gave him what goesWith a cold in the nose,And some more for a coldIn the head.They wonderedIf wheezlesCould turnInto measles,If sneezlesWould turnInto mumps;They examined his chestFor a rash,And the restOf his body for swellings and lumps.They sent for some doctorsIn sneezlesAnd wheezlesTo tell them what oughtTo be done.All sorts and conditionsOf famous physiciansCame hurrying roundAt a run.They all made a noteOf the state of his throat,They asked if he suffered from thirst;They asked if the sneezlesCame after the wheezles,Or if the first sneezleCame first.
FEATURES
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
Graduation speeches are often forgettable, but chances are members of the McDaniel College Class of 2014 won't soon forget when their college president rapped before handing out degrees. That's right: McDaniel President Roger N. Casey chose to deliver his brief remarks to Westminster college's 760 graduates in the form of an a cappella rhyme on Saturday afternoon. The social media-loving president dropped a few pop culture references and used his apparent favorite word: " McSwagger ," a term he invented to express McDaniel pride.
FEATURES
April 13, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/What, in Australian rhyme, does a kookaburra eat?Who's the director of the Museum of Photography?A 10-15 yrs. fun fact: ESWater has how many boreholes? (Go to http://www. esw.co.uk/funfactory/ to find out.)A PORTRAIT OF HISTORYIf a picture says a thousand words, then the American Museum of Photography is the ultimate storybook. This Web site features the who's who of famous shutterbugs.
SPORTS
December 20, 2008
1 Rhyme is reason: It's being called the Battle in Seattle: No. 2 Connecticut vs. No. 8 Gonzaga (4 p.m., chs. 13, 9). They had to play there because nothing good rhymes with Hartford. 2 Gator aid: Speaking of sites: No. 6 Duke plays No. 7 Xavier at the Izod Center in East Rutherford, N.J. (2 p.m., chs. 13, 9). Both teams will be required to have little alligators on their jerseys. 3 Oy-a, Hoyas: Mount St. Mary's takes a step up by taking on No. 15 Georgetown (1 p.m., MASN). 4 Eagle eyes: Navy kicks off the bowl season with a rematch against Wake Forest in the EagleBank game from RFK Stadium (11 a.m., ESPN)
NEWS
BY WILL ENGLUND | December 25, 2004
YUshchenko - Shchampagne? Viktor-y in Ukraine? The vote's tomorrow, Away then with sorrow! Today - a holiday refrain: Best to all, to all good cheer, Let Peach abound & banish fear! Raise now a toast (It surely helps) To Jamie Foxx and Michael Phelps, To Ken Jennings, camp of Jeopardy! And Cindy Wolf, all salt-and-pepperdy! Singh we a songh now to India's top guy, And to Ayad Allawi and Hamid Karzai. To Illinois Senator Barack Obama, A place in the Democrats' futurama! To Ariel Sharon and to Abu Mazen, Hopes for peace, West Bankish and Gazan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
Getting out of the local cultural mainstream, I recently took in the premiere of "Where the Whangdoodle Sings" by Generous Company at Theatre Project and the first staged presentation of "Red Giant" by Rhymes With Opera at the Windup Space. "Whangdoodle," a play by K. Frithjof Peterson, struck me as a rather forced fantasy, centering around a haunted tattoo artist named Voula and her equally haunted client, Benj, a stained glass window maker. The script combines a whole lot of issues -- myth, baseball (Hank Aaron's career gets particular emphasis)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
The words "opera" and "emotional" typically go together, but not in the way it will happen this weekend. The risk-taking Baltimore- and New York-based ensemble known as Rhymes With Opera, now in its sixth year, will premiere the complete version of Thomas Limbert's "Numbers/Dates. " It's a work that uses a text based on just that - numbers and dates. The performers supply the emotion. "The piece was born out of a neurobiology class I took at Duke University," Limbert said, "about speech perception and research on 'emotional prosody.' We heard sound samples of actors speaking semantically neutral numbers and dates in different emotions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
They've heard just about all the suggestions by now. But if you insist, you can approach members of the Rhymes with Opera ensemble Saturday at the Windup Space and offer your response to what is actually not a request. "We've had people come up to us and go, 'I've got it: Deepak Chopra,'" said Ruby Fulton, one of the Peabody Conservatory alums who founded the group. David Smooke, a composer and Peabody faculty member who teaches music theory and rock music history, has also heard his share of reactions since letting people know he wrote a work for Rhymes with Opera.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2011
I love lists. Specifically, those end-of-the-year, beginning-of-a-new-one lists. What's in, what's out. What were the biggest stories of last year, what to watch for in the coming one. Which celebs went through which stations of their particular crosses: who married, divorced, got arrested, gave birth, adopted or died. I love 'em for their found poetry — all these disparate events and people, tossed together simply by accident of the calendar. This is particularly true of news stories, I found, when I asked one of our baltimoresun.com gurus to find which articles on the website got the most hits in 2010.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2009
Sometimes the distillation of current events makes them more lucid. Yes, this flimsy rationale indicates that it's time for the Janet's World Current Events Poetry Column, wherein the latest twisted news gets a new twist. Please enjoy this absurd recapping of some ridiculous national and local stories in metered rhyme. Tiger's Roving Eye He's always shot well under par; Birdied near and bogeyed far, Behaved impeccably on the green And shied away from the tabloid scene.
SPORTS
December 20, 2008
1 Rhyme is reason: It's being called the Battle in Seattle: No. 2 Connecticut vs. No. 8 Gonzaga (4 p.m., chs. 13, 9). They had to play there because nothing good rhymes with Hartford. 2 Gator aid: Speaking of sites: No. 6 Duke plays No. 7 Xavier at the Izod Center in East Rutherford, N.J. (2 p.m., chs. 13, 9). Both teams will be required to have little alligators on their jerseys. 3 Oy-a, Hoyas: Mount St. Mary's takes a step up by taking on No. 15 Georgetown (1 p.m., MASN). 4 Eagle eyes: Navy kicks off the bowl season with a rematch against Wake Forest in the EagleBank game from RFK Stadium (11 a.m., ESPN)
NEWS
By MILTON BATES | September 3, 1993
Fats Drobnak, my somewhat ancient friend, was pensively munching a burger when I stopped by Winterling's last weekend.What's happening? I asked.''What' happening,'' Fats replied, ''is that it never ends.''Oh, that's an overstatement. I'm aware that hot weather troubles the obese, but Labor Day approaches.''I'm not talkin' about the heat. I mean namin' the football team which gettin' it is a maybe at best.''No, Fats. That's been settled. The fans have spoken loud and clear and it will be the Ravens.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 10, 1990
LET ME SAY from the get-go that I have never been the sort of person who appreciates poetry.As a young journalist fascinated by the inherent power of the written word, my taste in poetry tended to run toward passages that began: "There once was a man from Nantucket . . ."Over the years, my tolerance for the form increased very little, not even to the point where I could sit still for verse that had as its central theme:"You deserve a break today . . ."So come on and get away . . ."To McDonald's."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | October 30, 2008
He was thinking of a master plan. For Murs, signing with a major label wasn't about "selling out," and he certainly wasn't about to compromise his art too much. The underground West Coast rapper, an acclaimed independent artist for more than a decade, needed a bigger platform for his witty, richly metaphorical messages of perseverance and uplift. Warner Bros. Records certainly had the muscle, and last year the earnest artist signed on the dotted line. On Murs for President, his major-label debut released late last month, the rapper wanted to broaden his musical scope.
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