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By NANCY NOYES | November 27, 1994
Three Saturdays of round-the-buoy racing was the season-ending offering from the Rhode River Boat Club, with its annual Fall Series during the first three weekends of November.The series, which drew 13 starters in three J/boat meter classes, J/80, J/92, and J/105 using spinnakers, joined a PHRF nonspinnaker fleet of 14 starters and two three-boat one-design classes for Tritons and Alberg 30s.Two races were started each of the first two weeks, while only a single contest was the rule for the last week, bringing the series to five races for the PHRF'ers and the one-designs.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
A man injured after his boat collided with a power boat in southern Anne Arundel County was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center on Friday, officials said. The crash occurred in the West River, near Shady Side, at about 4:45 p.m., according to U.S. Coast Guard officials. A witness reported the accident and then held the man alongside his boat until a Coast Guard boat crew arrived to help. Emergency medical technicians were able to stabilize the man aboard the Coast Guard boat, officials said, and he was taken to the YMCA ball field off the Rhode River, where he was transported by a state police helicopter.
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SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | April 4, 1993
Chances are most racing sailors have been using their winter weekends for other pursuits than keeping themselves, their crews and their boats in top competitive trim.And even frostbiters have had to give up that pursuit with the end of those series well before the start of this area's High Point racing season with the Naval Academy Sailing Squadron Spring Race on May 1.There's a cure out there for boring weekends without any racing, and a remedy for winter rust in the skills and speed department, and it starts in about a week.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2007
At the crest of a rural hill south of Annapolis stands a ruin that appears to have spilled from the pages of a novel. What's left of one of the grandest brick homes of the colonial era are two towering chimneys and a few failing sections of low walls, all enrobed in vines and weeds but offering a breathtaking view of the Rhode River. "Had it survived, it would be one of the gems of the region," Al Luckenbach, Anne Arundel County archaeologist, said of what once was a 130-foot-long, five-section Palladian mansion whose main section was built around 1747.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2007
At the crest of a rural hill south of Annapolis stands a ruin that appears to have spilled from the pages of a novel. What's left of one of the grandest brick homes of the colonial era are two towering chimneys and a few failing sections of low walls, all enrobed in vines and weeds but offering a breathtaking view of the Rhode River. "Had it survived, it would be one of the gems of the region," Al Luckenbach, Anne Arundel County archaeologist, said of what once was a 130-foot-long, five-section Palladian mansion whose main section was built around 1747.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2005
Beneath a bluff by the Rhode River, oyster shells are falling out of the bank, which is eroding so readily that several big trees have toppled into the water. Atop the sandy bluff, archaeologists are digging holes, and the ones close to the water contain fragments of shells and pottery at least 1,000 years old. "Oysters don't have legs, so somebody brought them up here and ate them," said Al Luckenbach, Anne Arundel County's chief archaeologist. Another archaeological site has been discovered in the Rhode River area south of Annapolis, this one at the YMCA's sprawling Camp Letts in Edgewater.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
A man injured after his boat collided with a power boat in southern Anne Arundel County was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center on Friday, officials said. The crash occurred in the West River, near Shady Side, at about 4:45 p.m., according to U.S. Coast Guard officials. A witness reported the accident and then held the man alongside his boat until a Coast Guard boat crew arrived to help. Emergency medical technicians were able to stabilize the man aboard the Coast Guard boat, officials said, and he was taken to the YMCA ball field off the Rhode River, where he was transported by a state police helicopter.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | April 7, 1991
Norman E. Cummings bought his first boat late in life, long after hebegan to pull giant fishing nets across the Rhode River in Mayo or hauled crab pots by the shore. It came after the water ceased to form the center of his working life.But when he returned to the water,he did it in good old style -- in a Hooper Island draketail work boat.That fits. Talk to Cummings for a while and you see that the picture of the Rhode River that he holds most dear was snapped in the 1930s, when houses stood sparse along the shore and the waters ran abundant with crabs and oysters.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs | July 7, 1991
State Natural Resources Police searched the Rhode River in south Anne Arundel County last night for a New Carrollton man missing and presumed drowned after the motor boat he was aboard struck a large wake yesterday afternoon, throwing all eight passengers overboard, a police spokesman said.Michael W. Caldwell Sr., 29, had rescued one of his children from the river, then dived in again and disappeared in the 12-to-15-foot deep water, about 250 yards off-shore, said Cpl. Ralph Parker, spokesman for the Natural Resources Police.
SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | November 28, 1993
The official sailing season of the Chesapeake Bay Yacht Racing Association came to a close last weekend with the finale of the Rhode River Boat Club Fall Series.The three-Saturday, five-race affair drew 21 participants in five classes.Although RRBC's Fall Series does not count for the annual High Point standings, it is a traditional way to close the season for those who don't plan on sailing in one of the many frostbite series that continue through until March. It also offers a last chance to celebrate the racing spirit before packing up the boat for a long winter's nap.As usual, the club offered two races each of the first two weeks and a single final race last weekend.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2005
Beneath a bluff by the Rhode River, oyster shells are falling out of the bank, which is eroding so readily that several big trees have toppled into the water. Atop the sandy bluff, archaeologists are digging holes, and the ones close to the water contain fragments of shells and pottery at least 1,000 years old. "Oysters don't have legs, so somebody brought them up here and ate them," said Al Luckenbach, Anne Arundel County's chief archaeologist. Another archaeological site has been discovered in the Rhode River area south of Annapolis, this one at the YMCA's sprawling Camp Letts in Edgewater.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2003
Most weekday mornings, Phil Ruane would be in a computer class at South River High School in Edgewater, listening to his teacher and, as he puts it, "praying for the day to end." But yesterday, Ruane and two classmates found themselves next to the acting chief of the Environmental Protection Agency on a federal research boat in the Rhode River, testing the water for cleanliness as part of a ground-breaking international effort. "I feel like I'm learning a lot," said Ruane, 18, a senior.
SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | November 27, 1994
Three Saturdays of round-the-buoy racing was the season-ending offering from the Rhode River Boat Club, with its annual Fall Series during the first three weekends of November.The series, which drew 13 starters in three J/boat meter classes, J/80, J/92, and J/105 using spinnakers, joined a PHRF nonspinnaker fleet of 14 starters and two three-boat one-design classes for Tritons and Alberg 30s.Two races were started each of the first two weeks, while only a single contest was the rule for the last week, bringing the series to five races for the PHRF'ers and the one-designs.
SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | November 28, 1993
The official sailing season of the Chesapeake Bay Yacht Racing Association came to a close last weekend with the finale of the Rhode River Boat Club Fall Series.The three-Saturday, five-race affair drew 21 participants in five classes.Although RRBC's Fall Series does not count for the annual High Point standings, it is a traditional way to close the season for those who don't plan on sailing in one of the many frostbite series that continue through until March. It also offers a last chance to celebrate the racing spirit before packing up the boat for a long winter's nap.As usual, the club offered two races each of the first two weeks and a single final race last weekend.
SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | April 29, 1993
The three-week Rhode River Boat Club's Spring Series, with competition every Saturday since April 10, concluded last weekend for a fleet of 38 boats racing in six classes, a turnout race committee chairman Norman Baldwin said was the biggest in recent memory for the preseason warm-up series.PHRF splits based on turnout are a standard part of the series, but regatta organizers also are very cooperative with other groups wanting a one-design or other class start. This year's three PHRF divisions were augmented by separate classes for Alberg 30s and Tritons, as well as a unique level-racing class for J/92s and J/105s in combination.
SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | April 4, 1993
Chances are most racing sailors have been using their winter weekends for other pursuits than keeping themselves, their crews and their boats in top competitive trim.And even frostbiters have had to give up that pursuit with the end of those series well before the start of this area's High Point racing season with the Naval Academy Sailing Squadron Spring Race on May 1.There's a cure out there for boring weekends without any racing, and a remedy for winter rust in the skills and speed department, and it starts in about a week.
SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | April 29, 1993
The three-week Rhode River Boat Club's Spring Series, with competition every Saturday since April 10, concluded last weekend for a fleet of 38 boats racing in six classes, a turnout race committee chairman Norman Baldwin said was the biggest in recent memory for the preseason warm-up series.PHRF splits based on turnout are a standard part of the series, but regatta organizers also are very cooperative with other groups wanting a one-design or other class start. This year's three PHRF divisions were augmented by separate classes for Alberg 30s and Tritons, as well as a unique level-racing class for J/92s and J/105s in combination.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2003
Most weekday mornings, Phil Ruane would be in a computer class at South River High School in Edgewater, listening to his teacher and, as he puts it, "praying for the day to end." But yesterday, Ruane and two classmates found themselves next to the acting chief of the Environmental Protection Agency on a federal research boat in the Rhode River, testing the water for cleanliness as part of a ground-breaking international effort. "I feel like I'm learning a lot," said Ruane, 18, a senior.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs | July 7, 1991
State Natural Resources Police searched the Rhode River in south Anne Arundel County last night for a New Carrollton man missing and presumed drowned after the motor boat he was aboard struck a large wake yesterday afternoon, throwing all eight passengers overboard, a police spokesman said.Michael W. Caldwell Sr., 29, had rescued one of his children from the river, then dived in again and disappeared in the 12-to-15-foot deep water, about 250 yards off-shore, said Cpl. Ralph Parker, spokesman for the Natural Resources Police.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | April 7, 1991
Norman E. Cummings bought his first boat late in life, long after hebegan to pull giant fishing nets across the Rhode River in Mayo or hauled crab pots by the shore. It came after the water ceased to form the center of his working life.But when he returned to the water,he did it in good old style -- in a Hooper Island draketail work boat.That fits. Talk to Cummings for a while and you see that the picture of the Rhode River that he holds most dear was snapped in the 1930s, when houses stood sparse along the shore and the waters ran abundant with crabs and oysters.
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