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By VINCENT DeMARCO Did Gun-Ban Lobby Cook Up This Furor? | January 1, 1995
David Keen says his Rhino bullets will cause baseball-size wounds. Lawmakers want to ban them. The National Rifle Association says they may be a hoax. Meanwhile, Mr. Keen says he will delay release of a bullet that will pierce bullet-proof vests, but he will continue work on another Rhino bullet. Here are two views of the controversy.Technology, Violence Must Be Stopped NowThis past week, David Keen, manufacturer of the new killer handgun ammunition called "Rhino," bragged to the world that when someone is shot with a Rhino, "There is no way to stop the bleeding."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | November 30, 2006
Over the years, record labels have gotten wiser about repackaging old catalogs in box sets. With improvements in remastering technology, hits of yesterday sound as if they were recorded today. The advent of the DualDisc has also made the box-set experience more thrilling. Not only can you enjoy the hits, B-sides and alternate takes on one side, you can flip the disc and watch vintage performances and classic music videos on the other. Then, of course, there's the glossy booklet of rare photos and informative liner notes that generally accompany well-done sets.
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NEWS
August 13, 1993
Joe McGinniss wrote an entire book based on conversations he imagined with Sen. Ted Kennedy. The least we should be able to do is write an editorial based on our conversation with rhinoceros Daisey Mae over at the Baltimore Zoo:Us: What do you think about "Rhinos" as the possible name for a Baltimore professional football team?Daisey: Pass me a clump of that meadow grass, will ya?Us: Uh, sure. What about the name?Daisey: Actually, I'm a little insulted.Us: Insulted?Daisey: Yes. You've got 100-plus major league sports teams in America and none has ever adopted the heroic, powerful but non-predatory, image of the rhino.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | February 23, 2006
I almost hung up on Roberta Flack. Her assistant, Nicole, left a message on my voice mail at home one recent Thursday afternoon, telling me the pop legend would call that evening about 8:30. And since I'm terrible about checking my home messages, I had no idea to expect the call. Just as I was about to punish a plate of homemade tacos, my phone rings at 8:30 on the dot. Without checking the caller ID, I pick it up and groan. "Hello." Through fuzzy reception, a sweet-voiced woman asks, "May I speak to Roland?"
FEATURES
August 30, 1991
As goes the black rhino, so goes mankind. This is the conviction of Michael Werikhe, a 34-year-old man from Kenya who has made his efforts to preserve the endangered rhinoceros his life's work. Werikhe, known throughout the conservation world as "The Rhino Man," works by walking.He has trekked across Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania and across Europe to publicize the rhino's plight, that of Africa's other fading wildlife and to raise money for rhino conservation studies and sanctuaries.On the same mission, Werikhe is trekking through the United States this summer.
NEWS
By Joel McCord | September 2, 1991
Back home in Kenya, Michael Werikhe is a security supervisor for an automobile assembly plant, but he is better known as "The Rhino Man," a global crusader to save the endangered black rhinoceros.For nearly a decade, Mr. Werikhe has hiked thousands of miles across Africa and Europe to alert people to the plight of the rhinoceros and to raise money for its conservation.Now Mr. Werikhe is coming to the end of a 32-city, 1,500-mile trek across North America in an effort to raise $2 million for the project.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | August 28, 1993
Went to the zoo to get the lowdown.Not on the raven, stupid.The rhino.We know how you voted in the Sun poll, but "Ravens" got only 29 percent in that unscientific monstrosity -- the kind of victory that would give Gov. William Donald Schaefer a nervous breakdown.Seriously, which animal would you rather the team be named after, a bird out of an Edgar Allan Poe poem or a 5,000-pound mammal that runs 30 mph?That's right, 30 mph. Daisy Mae, the female rhino at the Baltimore Zoo, would destroy Brady Anderson in a match race, then toss him like a Frisbee with her two horns.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,Special to the Sun | April 24, 2005
Clara's Grand Tour: Travels with an Eighteenth-Century Rhinoceros By Glynis Ridley. Atlantic Monthly Press. 256 pages. $22. You've got to hand it to Glynis Ridley, an associate professor of English at the University of Louisville. She stumbled across a fascinating, never-before-told true story, and she did painstaking research in order to bring it to life. But Clara's tale, as told in Ridley's first book, reads less like the adventure story that her title suggests and more like a dry history textbook sprinkled with occasionally amusing and surprising details.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | November 23, 1993
UMFOLOZI, South Africa -- The ton and a half of rhinoceros grazing placidly next to the dirt road in this game park looked unconcerned by the fact that his kind had been rejected as mascot of Baltimore's potential NFL team.But, viewed from the car just a few feet away, it was hard to see how anyone could not think that rhinos would be the perfect name for a football team, certainly better than Bombers, which, in the South African context, seems to elevate terrorists to a position of admiration.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | August 12, 1993
Pity the poor rhino.The ancient beast has been driven from its native continent by weather changes, hunted to near-extinction for the supposedly sex-enhancing chemicals in its horn and terrorized day and night by packs of hyenas.And now the ponderous giant, after 50 million years of patient, vegetarian existence, may be denied its first shot at the big leagues by the merciless bashing of rhino-haters.The prospective owners of the city's NFL team tentatively settled on the name Rhinos over the past week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,Special to the Sun | April 24, 2005
Clara's Grand Tour: Travels with an Eighteenth-Century Rhinoceros By Glynis Ridley. Atlantic Monthly Press. 256 pages. $22. You've got to hand it to Glynis Ridley, an associate professor of English at the University of Louisville. She stumbled across a fascinating, never-before-told true story, and she did painstaking research in order to bring it to life. But Clara's tale, as told in Ridley's first book, reads less like the adventure story that her title suggests and more like a dry history textbook sprinkled with occasionally amusing and surprising details.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | July 15, 2004
ALTHOUGH IN A way it made sense that they were there, the Violent Femmes still felt a little out of place. In May, the band played the HFStival in D.C. I was there all day -- trying my best to keep cool with way overpriced bottles of water and trying to keep from going crazy after sitting through a succession of derivative metal rock acts on the main stage. The Violent Femmes played in the middle of the day and offered a tamer, more nuanced take of so-called angst-ridden rock. I dug it, and the older listeners seemed to feel the Femmes.
NEWS
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - Buffalo and antelope weren't the only critters to roam the Great Plains. The National Park Service has identified fossil remains excavated from South Dakota's Wind Cave National Park as belonging to - of all things - a rhinoceros. According to park service paleontologist Greg McDonald, who made the find, the animal was a smaller, distant cousin of the rhinos in present-day Africa and lived approximately 32 million years ago. "Back then, the climate of South Dakota was more like Florida's," McDonald said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
By EDWARD COLIMORE and By EDWARD COLIMORE,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | October 20, 2002
JACKSON TOWNSHIP, N.J. - Bill Rives was having another busy day at the office, making the daily rounds of patients - all 1,200 of them. He called out their names, talked to them and laughed at their antics. Denise, the towering giraffe who had run full steam into an oak tree, breaking her shoulder blade, was looking good, thanks to the doctor's surgical skills. "She's over at the feeder," Rives said as he headed off road into a herd of giraffes. 'See, her left shoulder is fine now." He paid a call on Rip, a 7-ton bull elephant with a fondness for banana-flavored monkey biscuits.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2001
Sweat beaded on his forehead, 13-year-old Andy Frevert crouches under a bush, poking through leaf litter, green eyes searching intently. Aha! He holds up a luna moth wing. It's in crummy condition, but it's a promising sign. Where you find moths, he says, you will also find beetles. Andy is a fledgling collector. He's among the distinct minority of folks who just can't wait for the whirring of tiny wings. He's mucking around near a large parking lot light, the kind of nightspot bugs can't resist.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 19, 2000
Back in 1981, just before the Police released the album "Ghost in the Machine," drummer Stewart Copeland paid tribute to Little Feat, stating that it was a great band that made some wonderfully sophisticated recordings. "They'd probably have been a lot bigger if they'd been a little more photogenic," he added. But Little Feat wasn't a pop band in the mass-appeal sense of the term, and the fact that they enjoyed any commercial success was a tribute to the adventurousness of rock fans in the '70s.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | August 12, 1993
Arrogance on the part of National Football League Properties (the licensing/merchandising arm of the NFL) and a serious lack of knowledge within the two potential ownership groupsinterested in obtaining a team for Baltimore brought about the ill-conceived suggestion that an expansion team be called the Rhinos.The entire scenario, sticking Rhinos on Baltimore, is moronic and an insult to the intelligence.Just don't solicit the governor's input. He named the baseball park after the Earl of Camden, a Britisher, who never set foot in America and had died long before baseball was invented.
NEWS
April 15, 1994
Every year there are more people who believe that ground tiger bone and rhinoceros horn are good for their health or potency, and fewer tigers and rhino to provide it.Leading estimates put the world wild tiger population at 5,000 and rhino population at 10,000. The chances are fairly good that in a decade, whatever the United States has done or failed to do, the only tiger and rhino alive in the world will be in captivity. That is something for people who disapprove of zoos to think about.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and By Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2000
Helen Wilson is doing her part for the survival of the rare white rhinoceros: standing for hours on end at the Baltimore Zoo and looking for things that would force most folks to avert their eyes. She jots down any signs that the zoo's two rhinos are about to mate, and the signals aren't pretty. In this case, a come-hither look doesn't involve batted eyelashes. A female rhino in the mood will curl her tail out of the way and back into the male. A randy male will sniff his potential mate's dung, then do the same to her backside.
NEWS
June 25, 1997
Save Baltimore by downsizing payrollMayor Schmoke thinks slot machines are the answer. He also supports building a major hotel more than a mile from the Convention Center.A recent story on National Public Radio compared six similar city governments. The result: Baltimore has three times as many city employees as other cities of a comparable size. With that many employees, we should never see a pothole, an unmowed park, an overflowing trash can, exorbitant street festival fees or garbage littering the steps of City Hall.
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