Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRheumatoid Arthritis
IN THE NEWS

Rheumatoid Arthritis

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
Drug company Amgen Inc. will pay the Maryland Medicaid system $856,474 to settle allegations that it illegally marketed and priced drugs used to treat anemia, rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases. The settlement, announced Friday by Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, is part of a $612 million deal Illinois-based Amgen made with the federal government and several other states. As part of the settlement, Amgen's future marketing practices will also be monitored by the federal government.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
March 6, 2013
On Friday, Feb. 1, award-winning New York chef, restaurateur and cookbook author Seamus Mullen joined mystery writer, columnist and book reviewer Jennifer Vido, of Harford County, for her 8th Annual Author Dinner for Arthritis. Vido has been living with rheumatoid arthritis since she was a child and advocates for the 1.1 million Marylanders living with arthritis. The event was sponsored by Andrew McMeel Publishing. Diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 2007, Mullen was determined to change the way he ate to help his body fight the RA. His cookbook, Hero Food, was released last year and focuses on foods that reduce inflammation in the body.
Advertisement
EXPLORE
March 6, 2013
On Friday, Feb. 1, award-winning New York chef, restaurateur and cookbook author Seamus Mullen joined mystery writer, columnist and book reviewer Jennifer Vido, of Harford County, for her 8th Annual Author Dinner for Arthritis. Vido has been living with rheumatoid arthritis since she was a child and advocates for the 1.1 million Marylanders living with arthritis. The event was sponsored by Andrew McMeel Publishing. Diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 2007, Mullen was determined to change the way he ate to help his body fight the RA. His cookbook, Hero Food, was released last year and focuses on foods that reduce inflammation in the body.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
Drug company Amgen Inc. will pay the Maryland Medicaid system $856,474 to settle allegations that it illegally marketed and priced drugs used to treat anemia, rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases. The settlement, announced Friday by Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, is part of a $612 million deal Illinois-based Amgen made with the federal government and several other states. As part of the settlement, Amgen's future marketing practices will also be monitored by the federal government.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Frances F. Trader, who worked in billing at Johns Hopkins Hospital, died Sept. 28 of pneumonia at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Rodgers Forge resident was 89. A daughter of Italian immigrants, Frances Fina was born in Baltimore and raised in Little Italy. After graduating from the Institute of Notre Dame in 1940, she was a war worker during World War II. She was married in 1952 to Hugh H. Trader Jr., who was a noted Baltimore News-Post sports reporter. He died in 1967.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | September 7, 1993
We all suffer from aching muscles and creaking joints from time to time, particularly as we get older. But for 2.5 million people in the United States -- the majority of them women -- these symptoms are associated with rheumatoid arthritis, a painful disease that can occur at any age from childhood to old age.Women are affected two to three times more often than men and the rate increases with age, from about 2 percent of women of all ages to 3 percent of...
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
Two drugs have been shown to bring remarkable improvement to patients in the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis - slowing or even stopping the painful joint damage that consigns many victims to wheelchairs. Researchers say the drugs, which work in a similar fashion, could represent the greatest advance ever in the treatment of the disease, which afflicts 2.1 million people in the United States. The majority of patients taking the drugs experienced less pain and joint damage, and many were able to walk without pain, according to the studies.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2008
Jen Schmidt doesn't show the pain. When the Friends School girls lacrosse team attacks, she flashes for the ball, going as hard and pivoting as quickly as anyone on the field. All the while, her feet and hands hurt, and sometimes her neck and back don't feel so good either. Six minutes into a recent game, the senior left the field to rub Flexall gel on her feet. That takes the edge off the constant pain of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis - a disease that causes inflammation of the joints and prevents many of those afflicted from playing sports.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2003
"I was having a little pain in my feet that day, so I was already aggravated." - Aida Turturro, telling Associated Press Radio that rheumatoid arthritis helped her character Janice push Ralphie down the stairs on The Sopranos.
NEWS
June 29, 2009
On June 23, 2009 RHONDA J. WHITTED WELCH. Friends may visit the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Wednesday, where a memorial service will commence at 5:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Rheumatoid Arthritis Charities in loving memory of Rhonda Welch.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Frances F. Trader, who worked in billing at Johns Hopkins Hospital, died Sept. 28 of pneumonia at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Rodgers Forge resident was 89. A daughter of Italian immigrants, Frances Fina was born in Baltimore and raised in Little Italy. After graduating from the Institute of Notre Dame in 1940, she was a war worker during World War II. She was married in 1952 to Hugh H. Trader Jr., who was a noted Baltimore News-Post sports reporter. He died in 1967.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2008
Jen Schmidt doesn't show the pain. When the Friends School girls lacrosse team attacks, she flashes for the ball, going as hard and pivoting as quickly as anyone on the field. All the while, her feet and hands hurt, and sometimes her neck and back don't feel so good either. Six minutes into a recent game, the senior left the field to rub Flexall gel on her feet. That takes the edge off the constant pain of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis - a disease that causes inflammation of the joints and prevents many of those afflicted from playing sports.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
Two drugs have been shown to bring remarkable improvement to patients in the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis - slowing or even stopping the painful joint damage that consigns many victims to wheelchairs. Researchers say the drugs, which work in a similar fashion, could represent the greatest advance ever in the treatment of the disease, which afflicts 2.1 million people in the United States. The majority of patients taking the drugs experienced less pain and joint damage, and many were able to walk without pain, according to the studies.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | September 7, 1993
We all suffer from aching muscles and creaking joints from time to time, particularly as we get older. But for 2.5 million people in the United States -- the majority of them women -- these symptoms are associated with rheumatoid arthritis, a painful disease that can occur at any age from childhood to old age.Women are affected two to three times more often than men and the rate increases with age, from about 2 percent of women of all ages to 3 percent of...
HEALTH
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | October 2, 1990
Q**I wish to disagree with the assertion in one of your columns that diet has nothing to do with arthritis. I was developing severe symptoms of arthritis when I came across an article by Dr. Norman F. Childers stating that sensitivity to foods of the nightshade family (tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, eggplant and paprika) can cause arthritis. Having eliminated these foods from my diet, I am free of pain. I do not understand why the medical profession persists in perpetuating the myth that arthritis and diet are unrelated.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 12, 1993
BOSTON -- For decades, doctors have been puzzled over why rheumatoid arthritis usually improves during pregnancy. The effect is often so striking that women and doctors alike call pregnancy the most powerful temporary treatment for arthritis.Now researchers have come up with a possible answer: genetic differences between the fetus and the woman may set off maternal immune responses that ameliorate the arthritis.In the study, being reported in today's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, relief from rheumatoid arthritis was more likely when there was a difference in certain genes between the fetus and the pregnant woman.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.