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By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | September 7, 1993
We all suffer from aching muscles and creaking joints from time to time, particularly as we get older. But for 2.5 million people in the United States -- the majority of them women -- these symptoms are associated with rheumatoid arthritis, a painful disease that can occur at any age from childhood to old age.Women are affected two to three times more often than men and the rate increases with age, from about 2 percent of women of all ages to 3 percent of...
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
We've all heard of arthritis in the knees and even the hips. But many people may not know the thumb is prone to the joint disease as well. Neil Zimmerman, hand surgeon at the Curtis National Hand Center at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, said the most common type of thumb arthritis happens gradually over time. What is thumb arthritis and what causes it? The most common type of arthritis that involves the thumb is osteoarthritis, also known as wear-and-tear arthritis, which is most commonly located in the joint at the base of the thumb where it joins the palm.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
Two drugs have been shown to bring remarkable improvement to patients in the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis - slowing or even stopping the painful joint damage that consigns many victims to wheelchairs. Researchers say the drugs, which work in a similar fashion, could represent the greatest advance ever in the treatment of the disease, which afflicts 2.1 million people in the United States. The majority of patients taking the drugs experienced less pain and joint damage, and many were able to walk without pain, according to the studies.
NEWS
June 29, 2009
On June 23, 2009 RHONDA J. WHITTED WELCH. Friends may visit the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Wednesday, where a memorial service will commence at 5:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Rheumatoid Arthritis Charities in loving memory of Rhonda Welch.
FEATURES
By Amy Wallace and Amy Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 15, 2000
HOLLYWOOD -- Few people outside his family knew it, but Steven Spielberg was sick. Earlier this month, the 52-year-old Oscar-winning filmmaker checked into the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, where doctors removed one of his kidneys, and no one in the media or the public had a clue. Word got out last week, four days after Spielberg's operation, when publicist Marvin Levy released a statement citing a kidney "irregularity." Spielberg was at home recuperating and even "doing some work," Levy said, and no follow-up treatment was needed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2003
"I was having a little pain in my feet that day, so I was already aggravated." - Aida Turturro, telling Associated Press Radio that rheumatoid arthritis helped her character Janice push Ralphie down the stairs on The Sopranos.
NEWS
June 29, 2009
On June 23, 2009 RHONDA J. WHITTED WELCH. Friends may visit the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Wednesday, where a memorial service will commence at 5:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Rheumatoid Arthritis Charities in loving memory of Rhonda Welch.
HEALTH
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | October 2, 1990
Q**I wish to disagree with the assertion in one of your columns that diet has nothing to do with arthritis. I was developing severe symptoms of arthritis when I came across an article by Dr. Norman F. Childers stating that sensitivity to foods of the nightshade family (tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, eggplant and paprika) can cause arthritis. Having eliminated these foods from my diet, I am free of pain. I do not understand why the medical profession persists in perpetuating the myth that arthritis and diet are unrelated.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1996
Advanced Biotherapy Concepts, a Rockville biotechnology company, said yesterday that it has launched a small human trial in Russia on a new treatment it has developed for rheumatoid arthritis.Initially, the company hopes to gather enough strong data on the unnamed drug to entice a major pharmaceutical house to form a strategic alliance with it, said Edmond Buccellato, Advanced Biotherapy's vice president for corporate affairs.Such alliances are increasingly common in the biotechnology industry.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 12, 1993
BOSTON -- For decades, doctors have been puzzled over why rheumatoid arthritis usually improves during pregnancy. The effect is often so striking that women and doctors alike call pregnancy the most powerful temporary treatment for arthritis.Now researchers have come up with a possible answer: genetic differences between the fetus and the woman may set off maternal immune responses that ameliorate the arthritis.In the study, being reported in today's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, relief from rheumatoid arthritis was more likely when there was a difference in certain genes between the fetus and the pregnant woman.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2008
Jen Schmidt doesn't show the pain. When the Friends School girls lacrosse team attacks, she flashes for the ball, going as hard and pivoting as quickly as anyone on the field. All the while, her feet and hands hurt, and sometimes her neck and back don't feel so good either. Six minutes into a recent game, the senior left the field to rub Flexall gel on her feet. That takes the edge off the constant pain of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis - a disease that causes inflammation of the joints and prevents many of those afflicted from playing sports.
NEWS
By MICHAEL STROH and MICHAEL STROH,SUN REPORTER | July 31, 2006
Before reports surfaced last week that he flunked a drug test, the biggest medical concern facing Tour de France champion Floyd Landis was joint replacement surgery for his much-publicized bum hip. And in that problem, at least, the cyclist has plenty of company. Fueled in part by fitness-crazed baby boomers and aging jocks who refuse to be sidelined by throbbing knees and other worn-out parts, experts expect a boom in joint replacement surgeries in the coming years. By 2030, the number of knee replacements in the United States is expected to jump 673 percent to 3.48 million, according to a study presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons' annual meeting in March.
NEWS
March 3, 2006
Diet Blood pressure and chocolate More good news for chocolate lovers -- this time from the Dutch, who love to make the sweet and consume it. A study of older men in the Netherlands indicated that those who ate the equivalent of one-third of a chocolate bar every day had lower blood pressure and a reduced risk of death. Researchers say it's still too early to conclude that the chocolate was responsible. And they point out that eating too much chocolate can make people fat -- a risk for heart disease and high blood pressure.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2005
Shares of Human Genome Sciences Inc. fell nearly 30 percent yesterday, the second-biggest percentage decliner on the Nasdaq stock market, after the Rockville biotech company reported disappointing clinical trial results for an experimental lupus treatment. The company's stock closed at $9.87, down from $13.97 a day earlier. With nearly 50 million shares sold yesterday, it traded at 20 times its average volume. That made Human Genome the fourth-most-active stock on the Nasdaq, between computer giants Microsoft Corp.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2005
MedImmune Inc. announced plans yesterday to acquire another Gaithersburg biotech company, Cellective Therapeutics Inc. - a startup drawing attention from investors because of its research into treatments for cancers and various autoimmune diseases. Terms of the cash deal, expected to close next month, were not revealed, though MedImmune said the transaction would cause 2005 earnings per share to drop 20 cents - to between 4 cents and 10 cents - because of a "one-time in-process research and development charge."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and By Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2005
Sometimes, Sarah Hill gets tired of being strong, sick of being brave and courageous and determined. "Perky" -- now that would be OK. Ditto with "cute" and "smart." But on certain days, she's just had it up to here with "stalwart." "Her greatest desire is to be just like every other 10 1/2 -year-old girl. Her biggest frustration is that she's not," said her mother, Hope Barmat Hill. "The amazing thing that she doesn't get about herself at all, is that she's so much more because she has to come so much further each day."
FEATURES
By Medical Tribune News Service | July 26, 1995
Sometimes the wheels of progress turn faster than expected.Last week, scientists reported that low-dose steroids are effective for treating rheumatoid arthritis -- but other experts warned that long-term use of steroids can cause bone loss.Now, another group of researchers reports that estrogen-replacement therapy can block the bone-damaging effects of steroid treatment.British and French investigators, led by Dr. G. M. Hall of St. Thomas Hospital in London, studied 106 postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | September 6, 1991
A $15 million bequest from an Anne Arundel County woman who suffered from arthritis is serving as the springboard for new basic and clinical research efforts in immunology and rheumatic diseases at the Johns Hopkins and University of Maryland schools of medicine.The Maryland chapter of the Arthritis Foundation -- the beneficiary of the endowment from Virginia Engalitcheff of Gibson Island -- yesterday made its first awards of $200,000 each to the city's two academic research centers and said there would be more multiyear grants for promising research.
NEWS
April 28, 2005
On Wednesday, April 27, 2005, LAWRENCE A. EPSTEIN, beloved father of Evan Epstein of Clarksville, MD, and Jaime Busse of Fairfax, VA, dear father-in-law of Debi Epstein and Tim Busse, devoted brother of Ruth Miller of Columbia, MD, loving grandfather of Lindsey Epstein Metzler, Hanna Busse, Andrea Bragg, Joshua Bragg and Emily Bragg. Funeral Service and Interment will be held at the Columbia Memorial Park, Columbia, MD on Friday, April 29 at 11 A.M. Please omit flowers. The family has directed all contributions to: Rheumatoid Arthritis, c/o Arthritis Foundation, 9505 Reisterstown Road, Suite 1 North, Owings Mills, MD (21117)
NEWS
By Melanie R. Holmes and Melanie R. Holmes,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2004
Fifteen-year-old Danny Ortman knows from experience what most kids his age don't believe: Arthritis is not a disease reserved for the elderly. For four years, he has battled juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, a complication of the joints that affects 300,000 children nationwide. Besides crediting prayer and perseverance, Danny is grateful to the American Juvenile Arthritis Organization National Conference for helping him cope with JRA. "The kids you meet [at the conferences] can relate to you," he said.
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