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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Emiline D. Lazzeri, a Baltimore County native who as a child lived for a year in a glass-encased room at Johns Hopkins Hospital while being treated for rheumatic fever , died of congestive heart failure March 14 at her home in Largo, Fla. She was 80. Born Emiline Phillips, she grew up across the city line in Baltimore County's Jones Creek neighborhood and graduated from Sparrows Point High School. Her childhood was marked by a rare illness she developed at age 6. In attempts to diagnose the illness, she became a fixture at Baltimore's most famous medical institution for one year and linked to one of its most renowned doctors forever.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Emiline D. Lazzeri, a Baltimore County native who as a child lived for a year in a glass-encased room at Johns Hopkins Hospital while being treated for rheumatic fever , died of congestive heart failure March 14 at her home in Largo, Fla. She was 80. Born Emiline Phillips, she grew up across the city line in Baltimore County's Jones Creek neighborhood and graduated from Sparrows Point High School. Her childhood was marked by a rare illness she developed at age 6. In attempts to diagnose the illness, she became a fixture at Baltimore's most famous medical institution for one year and linked to one of its most renowned doctors forever.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
At least one student at George Washington Elementary in southwest Baltimore has been diagnosed with scarlet fever, according to the city health department. A letter was sent home to parents Thursday detailing the illness' symptoms. Scarlet fever is a common infection caused by streptococcus bacteria and spread by person-to-person contact, coughing and sneezing, according to the letter. The illness can be treated with antibiotics. If left untreated, complications such as rheumatic fever and kidney disease may ensue, the letter says.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
At least one student at George Washington Elementary in southwest Baltimore has been diagnosed with scarlet fever, according to the city health department. A letter was sent home to parents Thursday detailing the illness' symptoms. Scarlet fever is a common infection caused by streptococcus bacteria and spread by person-to-person contact, coughing and sneezing, according to the letter. The illness can be treated with antibiotics. If left untreated, complications such as rheumatic fever and kidney disease may ensue, the letter says.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
For more than half a century, researchers have tried to create a vaccine against Group A streptococcus, the nasty infectious bacteria that cause strep throat and rheumatic fever - and kill up to half a million people a year in the developing world. They might finally be on the right track. In a study published in today's issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association, scientists report that a new strep vaccine showed strong signs of working in humans and is also safe. "This is an important first step," said the study's lead author, University of Maryland vaccine researcher Karen Kotloff.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 30, 2009
Myra Roseman, a retired bacteriologist and research associate with the department of epidemiology at what is now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, died Nov. 21 from complications of dementia at the North Oaks retirement community. She was 88. Myra Goldenberg, the daughter of an engineer and homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park. After graduating from Western High School in 1937, she was 19 when she earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry and bacteriology from Goucher College.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2010
Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake might be Baltimore's highest-ranking mother, balancing her role as mom to 6-year-old Sophia with her duties as mayor. But there is another mother who plays an important role in City Hall — the mayor's mom. Whether she is caring for her lively young granddaughter or embracing old friends or former patients at official events, Dr. Nina Rawlings stands by her daughter, offering quiet wisdom and a helping hand. "I could not do what I do as mayor without my mom," said Rawlings-Blake, explaining that her mother hustles Sophia off to school in the morning and helps her with homework in the afternoon.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2000
He got drunk and fell on his head. Doctors accidentally bled him to death. Antonio Salieri, a jealous court composer, poisoned him. His mistress' husband did him in. One by one, more than 100 speculative diagnoses surrounding the mysterious death of one of the world's most celebrated composers have shriveled under scientific scrutiny. Yesterday, at the University of Maryland Medical Center, while a string quartet tuned in a nearby practice room, a physician announced that she had possibly hit upon the definitive solution to the demise of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2010
Henry Strohminger, a retired automobile dealership owner who was a founder of a support group for heart transplant patients, died of kidney failure Friday at his Surfside Beach, S.C., home. The former Glen Arm and Severna Park resident was 77. Born in Baltimore and raised on Hudson Street in Highlandtown, he attended Sacred Heart of Jesus School and was a 1952 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School. He remained active in the school's alumni association and was its president for two terms and chaired its bull and oyster roasts.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2002
During the recent commemoration of the one-year anniversary of the Sept. 11 tragedy, one masterwork of the choral music canon made history as the vehicle for mankind's first "Rolling Requiem." That piece, performed sequentially across many of the world's time zones by musicians honoring those who sustained loss in the terrorist attacks, was the Requiem Mass composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart as he himself was dying in the late autumn of 1791. "It's a profound piece of music," says Frances Motyca Dawson, whose Columbia Pro Cantare Chorus will open its 26th season Saturday evening at Jim Rouse Theatre with Mozart's grand setting of the Roman Catholic liturgy for the dead.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2010
Henry Strohminger, a retired automobile dealership owner who was a founder of a support group for heart transplant patients, died of kidney failure Friday at his Surfside Beach, S.C., home. The former Glen Arm and Severna Park resident was 77. Born in Baltimore and raised on Hudson Street in Highlandtown, he attended Sacred Heart of Jesus School and was a 1952 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School. He remained active in the school's alumni association and was its president for two terms and chaired its bull and oyster roasts.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2010
Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake might be Baltimore's highest-ranking mother, balancing her role as mom to 6-year-old Sophia with her duties as mayor. But there is another mother who plays an important role in City Hall — the mayor's mom. Whether she is caring for her lively young granddaughter or embracing old friends or former patients at official events, Dr. Nina Rawlings stands by her daughter, offering quiet wisdom and a helping hand....
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 30, 2009
Myra Roseman, a retired bacteriologist and research associate with the department of epidemiology at what is now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, died Nov. 21 from complications of dementia at the North Oaks retirement community. She was 88. Myra Goldenberg, the daughter of an engineer and homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park. After graduating from Western High School in 1937, she was 19 when she earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry and bacteriology from Goucher College.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
For more than half a century, researchers have tried to create a vaccine against Group A streptococcus, the nasty infectious bacteria that cause strep throat and rheumatic fever - and kill up to half a million people a year in the developing world. They might finally be on the right track. In a study published in today's issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association, scientists report that a new strep vaccine showed strong signs of working in humans and is also safe. "This is an important first step," said the study's lead author, University of Maryland vaccine researcher Karen Kotloff.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2002
During the recent commemoration of the one-year anniversary of the Sept. 11 tragedy, one masterwork of the choral music canon made history as the vehicle for mankind's first "Rolling Requiem." That piece, performed sequentially across many of the world's time zones by musicians honoring those who sustained loss in the terrorist attacks, was the Requiem Mass composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart as he himself was dying in the late autumn of 1791. "It's a profound piece of music," says Frances Motyca Dawson, whose Columbia Pro Cantare Chorus will open its 26th season Saturday evening at Jim Rouse Theatre with Mozart's grand setting of the Roman Catholic liturgy for the dead.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2000
He got drunk and fell on his head. Doctors accidentally bled him to death. Antonio Salieri, a jealous court composer, poisoned him. His mistress' husband did him in. One by one, more than 100 speculative diagnoses surrounding the mysterious death of one of the world's most celebrated composers have shriveled under scientific scrutiny. Yesterday, at the University of Maryland Medical Center, while a string quartet tuned in a nearby practice room, a physician announced that she had possibly hit upon the definitive solution to the demise of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | February 26, 1991
What's a Mozart bicentennial celebration without a dispute about his death, burial and remains?Now comes Pierre-Francois Puech, a French anthropologist who says his study shows a skull held by the Salzburg Mozarteum since 1901 is definitely Mozart's. Puech says the skull shows a left temple fracture possibly resulting from a fall. Further, he says, the fracture caused a chronic hematoma (bleeding between brain and skull) that may have led to Mozart's previously documented headaches, weakness, fainting, coma and death 200 years ago Dec. 5.Not so fast, says Friedrich Gehmacher, president of the Mozarteum, which is the official home of archival materials and Mozart memorabilia.
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